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"Change" cannot be used as a passivised verb? Options
A cooperator
Posted: Monday, December 04, 2017 4:14:41 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 10/27/2011
Posts: 2,405
Neurons: 8,767
Location: Ḩāḑírah, Hadramawt, Yemen
Hi Everyone!
I heard about "change" cannot be used as a passivised verb although it can be used transitively and intransitively.
Marriage has really changed her.
She has really been changed by marriage.

Here "change" is used intransitively and cannot be used as a passivised verb in this meaning.
She has changed a lot since she got married.

Whoever doesn't own what he promises to those who do not deserve must not promise it.
thar
Posted: Tuesday, December 05, 2017 4:10:40 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/8/2010
Posts: 16,017
Neurons: 64,151
An intransitive verb can never form a passive.

If there is nothing receiving the action, there is no passive subject.

I eat the bread.
The bread is eaten [by me].

Transitive >passive.

I eat.
Intransitive.
What is the object? What is eaten? Nothing - so there is no passive form.


This is nothing special about the verb 'to change'. It is true of all intransitives.
Take away all the adverbs and you have a simple verb, which can either be transitive or intransitive.


Marriage changed her.
She was changed [by marriage]


But
She changed.
No object, so no passive.

Ah, I think I might see your problem.

'To change' is one of those verbs that can mean the same whether you use the passive or active form.
I cook the meat.
The meat cooks.

But, with these verbs, you can also make the transitive passive.
I cook the meat.
The meat is cooked [by me].
So there ate three ways of saying it.

Marriage changes her.
She is changed [by marriage]
She changes.
A cooperator
Posted: Tuesday, December 05, 2017 8:27:17 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 10/27/2011
Posts: 2,405
Neurons: 8,767
Location: Ḩāḑírah, Hadramawt, Yemen
thar wrote:
An intransitive verb can never form a passive.

If there is nothing receiving the action, there is no passive subject.

I eat the bread.
The bread is eaten [by me].

Transitive >passive.

I eat.
Intransitive.
What is the object? What is eaten? Nothing - so there is no passive form.


This is nothing special about the verb 'to change'. It is true of all intransitives.
Take away all the adverbs and you have a simple verb, which can either be transitive or intransitive.


Marriage changed her.
She was changed [by marriage]


But
She changed.
No object, so no passive.

Ah, I think I might see your problem.

'To change' is one of those verbs that can mean the same whether you use the passive or active form.
I cook the meat.
The meat cooks.

But, with these verbs, you can also make the transitive passive.
I cook the meat.
The meat is cooked [by me].
So there ate three ways of saying it.

Marriage changes her.
She is changed [by marriage]
She changes.

Thanks a lot, Thar,


Whoever doesn't own what he promises to those who do not deserve must not promise it.
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