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she drew up a hassock Options
Харбин Хэйлунцзян 1
Posted: Friday, November 17, 2017 8:00:33 AM

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How do I understand this?



აბა ყვავებს ვინ დაიჭერს, კარგო? გალიაში ბულბულები ზიან.
Romany
Posted: Friday, November 17, 2017 8:36:30 AM
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I don't quite understand your question? "The meaning of "hassock" is...."followed by a list of options of which only one has a tick means that's the correct answer.

That's not particularly an "English" question - so am not sure what the problem you are encountering is?
thar
Posted: Friday, November 17, 2017 9:34:06 AM

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Is your problem with the verb, and how that relates?

Remember to draw is to pull - like a drawer. And 'up' is in, towards something.


She pulled up a hassock.

In this case I suspect a cushioned stool.



But this is a novel. Out of context, withot knowing where they are, or without cultural knowledge of what the Light Brigade is, this sentence is ridiculous!

I can't imagine the situation!


Nobody learns meaning without context! d'oh!

Харбин Хэйлунцзян 1
Posted: Friday, November 17, 2017 9:55:43 AM

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thar wrote:
But this is a novel. Out of context, withot knowing where they are, or without cultural knowledge of what the Light Brigade is, this sentence is ridiculous!

I can't imagine the situation!

Nobody learns meaning without context! d'oh!


But I'm somehow expected to choose the correct answer in this game. So I thought there must be sufficient context and it's the ignorant Russian that I am who can not make sense of it. :)

აბა ყვავებს ვინ დაიჭერს, კარგო? გალიაში ბულბულები ზიან.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Friday, November 17, 2017 9:55:52 AM

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The only Light Brigade I know is a bunch of British soldiers.

You wouldn't pull up a hassock to join them, you'd get on your horse and join them!



I think that you are supposed to know that a hassock is not a light, a table or a book.


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
thar
Posted: Friday, November 17, 2017 10:01:23 AM

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Well, at the simplest level, when you 'join' someone, you sit down with them. So a seat is the most useful option.
You could pull up a lamp or a table, but that doesn't seem very useful!

And you can't pull up a book.

It refers to a piece of furniture. But more than that....it really has no context so it can't be 'accommodated' into your knowledge. Random facts get forgotten.
Харбин Хэйлунцзян 1
Posted: Friday, November 17, 2017 10:06:08 AM

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Drag0nspeaker wrote:
The only Light Brigade I know is a bunch of British soldiers.

The charge of the Light Brigade is the episode in Crimean War well known to the British and Russian but there were not women among them not to speak of hassocks, cassocks or Cossacks.

აბა ყვავებს ვინ დაიჭერს, კარგო? გალიაში ბულბულები ზიან.
thar
Posted: Friday, November 17, 2017 12:38:08 PM

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That is the point, context. The only novel I know of called 'Go set a watchman' is from Harper Lee, author of To Kill a Mockingbird. One thing I can say with absolute certainty is that she wasn't writing a about a light cavalry brigade!

Context is king



A church, seems reasonable. Hassocks maybe. Cassocks, unlikely, Cossacks.....well, it was controversial...
Romany
Posted: Friday, November 17, 2017 1:08:48 PM
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As I read the sentence the imagined context was: a gathering of some sort. Groups of people nattering. One group is (say) a mixed group discussing servant problems; another is talking politics; while a group of soldiers is discussing feats of derring-do, and adventures in foreign lands.

She doesn't have a servant problem, politics bore her; so she decided to join the group talking of exciting adventures.

Edited to add: -
ps - you do realise, don't you, that those other sentences are NOT alternative meanings for a "hassock"? They're just random, incorrect meanings which DON'T mean "hassock".
Харбин Хэйлунцзян 1
Posted: Friday, November 17, 2017 1:12:28 PM

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Romany wrote:
As I read the sentence the imagined context was: a gathering of some sort. Groups of people nattering. One group is (say) a mixed group discussing servant problems; another is talking politics; while a group of soldiers is discussing feats of derring-do, and adventures in foreign lands.

She doesn't have a servant problem, politics bore her; so she decided to join the group talking of exciting adventures.

That puts everything in place. :)

Thank you!


აბა ყვავებს ვინ დაიჭერს, კარგო? გალიაში ბულბულები ზიან.
Romany
Posted: Friday, November 17, 2017 1:27:18 PM
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Only too pleased I was - finally - able to help!
mactoria
Posted: Saturday, November 18, 2017 3:07:56 AM
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Did a search of "Go Set A Watchman" on google books, but text on-line was limited and didn't include this particular sentence. However, the Jean Louise in the quote is the main character of the book (known to almost everyone as "Scout" but to her staid aunt with her given name of Jean Louise). She's been away at college, comes back to her small southern home town where things are slow, etc. I think it's likely that the "Light Brigade" in your quote is a reference to the poem by Tennyson, and that she's either choosing a book of poems to read in her leisure time (e.g. drawing up a hassock/stool to sit on while reading this poem/poetry book) or is in some kind of book/poetry club meeting and draws up a hassock/stool to sit with the group that's reading and discussing this poem/book. I could be wrong, and perhaps it's not the Tennyson poem, but instead a non-fiction book about the Light Brigade.

For your purposes, whether it's the Tennyson poem about the Light Brigade or a book on the Light Brigade is not really relevant as evidently you just wanted to know what "drewup a hassock" referred to. As a couple other posters indicated, it just means she's moving a hassock/ottoman/stool to sit upon to be comfortable after deciding to read or discuss something about the Light Brigade (in the TFD dictionary function, it would be the #1 definition of "draw," about moving or dragging something. This book is about people in the deep south in the middle 20th century, and its author Harper Lee was a "southern lady" so the use of "drew up" in this context fits the language of the time and region. It's likely that most people outside of the southern US today wouldn't use the phrase "drew up" as it's sort of an old-fashioned phrase to be used in this kind of context.
Sarrriesfan
Posted: Saturday, November 18, 2017 4:10:47 AM

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I think that in this case "The Light Brigade" does not refer to the light cavalry or the poem by Tennyson, as I understand it it refers to small group of people that Jean Louise refers to by that name for some reason, presumably as they like electrical appliances so much.
Google Books Go Set A Watchman extract
She draws up the hassock to join their group and enter the conversation they were having.

I lack the imagination for a witty signature.
Eoin Riedy
Posted: Saturday, November 18, 2017 2:18:00 PM

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thar wrote:
A church, seems reasonable. Hassocks maybe. Cassocks, unlikely, Cossacks.....well, it was controversial...


A hassock in church would be for kneeling on rather than sitting.



Hassocks originally referred to clumps of turf.



You can see the progression up to a footstool.

Since Eastern Christians don't kneel during church (although they may drop to their knees in prostration), I think we can safely leave out the Cossacks, and forgive Харбин Хэйлунцзян 1 for not making sense of it.
Sarrriesfan
Posted: Saturday, November 18, 2017 6:09:51 PM

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Drag0nspeaker wrote:
The only Light Brigade I know is a bunch of British soldiers.

You wouldn't pull up a hassock to join them, you'd get on your horse and join them!



I think that you are supposed to know that a hassock is not a light, a table or a book.


Isn't that the painting known as "Scotland Forever" that depicts the charge of the Scots Greys during the Battle of Waterloo?

The Light Brigade at Balaclava were lancers not sword wielding heavy cavalry.


I lack the imagination for a witty signature.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Sunday, November 19, 2017 4:17:51 AM

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Sorry if the image was not quite right - that was the one which popped up when I searched for 'Light Brigade' d'oh!

Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
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