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fixed Dec19 Options
Koh Elaine
Posted: Monday, November 13, 2017 12:29:16 PM
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We will have wait for the High Court ruling before deciding on the next course of action,” Varughese said.

Justice Azizah Nawawi has fixed Dec 19 to hear the Bar’s reference application and the government’s move to annul the suit.

Is the part in bold phrased correctly?

Thanks.
Romany
Posted: Monday, November 13, 2017 12:56:28 PM
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Koh -

I think this whole article you're quoting from atm, is in AE - because this, to me, seems like a similar usage to one you questioned previously.

I took a guess at the other one, but am not at all sure whether this one is used in AE or not.
taurine
Posted: Monday, November 13, 2017 1:02:07 PM

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I dare say that the story with the "fixing" sounds possible.
What I would say about "the government’s move to annul the suit" sounds possible as long as one government is involved in it, only.

It might be interesting if more than one government is involved. I never heard about it, of course.
[who cares about secretary]
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Monday, November 13, 2017 1:32:53 PM

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The phrase 'fixed December the nineteenth' is correct (the use of figures is questionable, but the phrasing is OK).

It means that the Justice (judge) decided that the next meeting of the court about this case would be on the nineteenth of December.
The Justice FIXED that date - it will not change.

**************
The whole quotation (the two sentences) is in "Media English" which is not the same as formal written English - and is not the same as conversational English.
It is a special kind of English used by reporters and editors.


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Koh Elaine
Posted: Monday, November 13, 2017 1:46:13 PM
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Thanks, DragOnspeaker.

How does the sentence look like if it is written in formal English?
georgieporgie
Posted: Monday, November 13, 2017 3:21:52 PM
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Koh Elaine wrote:
We will have wait for the High Court ruling before deciding on the next course of action,” Varughese said.

Justice Azizah Nawawi has fixed Dec 19 to hear the Bar’s reference application and the government’s move to annul the suit.

Is the part in bold phrased correctly?

Thanks.

The wording is quite common in AE. It means Justice Azizah Nawawi has set the date of Dec 19 to hear ...
Dennis Chen
Posted: Monday, November 13, 2017 5:08:16 PM

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Never heard of "fixed Dec 19"

Proud sponsor of the Kutztown Middle School Jazz Band
Rodrigo Cesar Bagnara
Posted: Monday, November 13, 2017 8:07:43 PM

Rank: Newbie

Joined: 11/13/2017
Posts: 1
Location: São José dos Campos, Sao Paulo, Brazil
Drag0nspeaker wrote:
The phrase 'fixed December the nineteenth' is correct (the use of figures is questionable, but the phrasing is OK).

It means that the Justice (judge) decided that the next meeting of the court about this case would be on the nineteenth of December.
The Justice FIXED that date - it will not change.

**************
The whole quotation (the two sentences) is in "Media English" which is not the same as formal written English - and is not the same as conversational English.
It is a special kind of English used by reporters and editors.


Thanks, I do not knew it! =D Now I know!!! =DD Thanks to you by that. =D
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Tuesday, November 14, 2017 2:31:53 AM

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Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
Quote:
How does the sentence look like if it is written in formal English?

In British English, I think it would be more common to put the date at the end, and use a couple of slightly different phrases.

It's not very different, but I don't think 'fixed' and 'move' really fit the formal tone.

Justice Azizah Nawawi has fixed Dec 19 to hear the Bar’s reference application and the government’s move to annul the suit.

Justice Azizah Nawawi will hear both the Bar's reference application and the government's annulment motion on the nineteenth of December.

Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Koh Elaine
Posted: Tuesday, November 14, 2017 3:20:30 AM
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Thanks, DragOnspeaker.

I agree with your rephrasing.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Tuesday, November 14, 2017 3:24:54 AM

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I'm glad it makes sense! Dancing

She's getting herself in the news as a 'controversial judge' quite a lot, isn't she?


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Koh Elaine
Posted: Tuesday, November 14, 2017 4:29:12 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/4/2012
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Drag0nspeaker wrote:
I'm glad it makes sense! Dancing

She's getting herself in the news as a 'controversial judge' quite a lot, isn't she?

I have no idea, actually. I don't follow Malaysian politics closely.
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