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onomatopoeia #3 Options
D00M
Posted: Saturday, November 11, 2017 9:35:34 AM

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Joined: 3/24/2017
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Hello respected teachers,

Are my answers to the following questions correct? There may be more than one correct answer for each question, so I need to learn all the possible answers that native speakers may use in the given context.

Fill in blanks with words from the following list.

Roar, hum, twitter, rattle, rasp, whistle, swish, whir, zip, rumble, zoom, hiss, flop, thump, thud, gurgle, splash, ping, whoosh, patter, chirr, racket, babble, moan, tinkle, barking, click, whack, coo, gabble, jingle, sizzle, plop, hubbub, chirp, groan, howling, scream, murmur, whine,rustle, flutter, buzz, wheeze.



29. The rasp of a file.
30. The hum of a passing car.
31. The roar of a lion.
32. The rasp of the wagon over the stones.
33. The swish of the wind.
34. The thump of heavy shoes.
35. Th rattle of milk bottles.
36. The groan of heels on stairs.
37. The ??????? of jet engines.
38. The ??????? of stream.
39. The rumble of train.
40. The whir of sewing machine.
41. The ??????? of an old engine.
42. The thump of a hard blow.

Part #1 here: http://forum.thefreedictionary.com/postst177526_onomatopoeia-1.aspx

I am looking forward to your answers.
FounDit
Posted: Saturday, November 11, 2017 11:10:57 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/19/2011
Posts: 8,221
Neurons: 43,957
D00M wrote:
Hello respected teachers,

Are my answers to the following questions correct? There may be more than one correct answer for each question, so I need to learn all the possible answers that native speakers may use in the given context.

Fill in blanks with words from the following list.

Roar, hum, twitter, rattle, rasp, whistle, swish, whir, zip, rumble, zoom, hiss, flop, thump, thud, gurgle, splash, ping, whoosh, patter, chirr, racket, babble, moan, tinkle, barking, click, whack, coo, gabble, jingle, sizzle, plop, hubbub, chirp, groan, howling, scream, murmur, whine,rustle, flutter, buzz, wheeze.



29. The rasp of a file.
30. The hum of a passing car.
31. The roar of a lion.
32. The rasp rattle or rumble fits better of the wagon over the stones.
33. The swish flutter/roar/hiss/scream are often used of the wind. depends on the force of the wind
34. The thump of heavy shoes.
35. Th rattle of milk bottles.
36. The groan click of heels on stairs. If it is a woman's high heels, but thud perhaps for a man's boot/shoe.
37. The ??????? roar of jet engines.
38. The ??????? gurgle of stream.
39. The rumble of train.
40. The whir of sewing machine.
41. The ??????? roar/hum/whine of an old engine. depending on the type of engine
42. The thump of a hard blow.

Part #1 here: http://forum.thefreedictionary.com/postst177526_onomatopoeia-1.aspx


A great many people will think they are thinking when they are merely rearranging their prejudices. ~ William James ~
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Saturday, November 11, 2017 12:28:30 PM

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Joined: 9/12/2011
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Neurons: 149,215
Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
To add some choices:

A passing car may hum (if it's an electric car) but also roar, rattle, swish, whoosh or howl - it depends on the author!

Streams are also written of as 'babbling brooks', 'rattling', 'gurgling' or 'murmuring'.

My mum's sewing machine clattered, it didn't whir.
The best word on your list is 'racket' - which can be used for any loud unpleasant noise.



Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Romany
Posted: Sunday, November 12, 2017 6:37:33 AM
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Joined: 6/14/2009
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Location: Brighton, England, United Kingdom

I've read all three of these onomatopoeic posts, and I'm afraid I don't find the majority of words in the slightest bit onomatopoeic.

"Clickety clack, clickety-clack goes the old steam engine."
"The soft susurration of the of the waves on the sand"
"The plinkety=plonk of raindrops on the roof."
"The cat hissed at us."

Onomatopoeia has to do with SOUNDS - "clickety-clack, clickety-clack" the syllables and hard sounds "K", the up and down of the rythm of the words - all help to suggest the noise an old-fashioned train used to make. The word "hiss" is PRONOUNCED in a sibilant, unvoiced way that is echoed in the way a cat hisses. Even "plinkety plonk" which rises and falls as we say it and has a full, rounded sound like a raindrop hitting, help us understand this is not a downpour (the 'roar' of the rain) just the occasional bit drops.

"Bark", for example, sounds absolutely nothing like the noise a dog makes. Whereas "Woof" with the 'w' and 'f' sounds like those, well, woofly sounds a dog makes under its breath.

I wouldn't agree with Drago either, that the actual word "racket" sounds very racket-y. Whereas a word like "cacophony" which, again, has those harsh sounds like "k" in it and is comprised of different-sounding syllables,doesn't sound smooth and sweet but disjointed, harsh....like a 'racket' is being made.

Onomatopeia is nothing to do with the look of a word but with the sound of it. Children pick this up very early; running around shouting ""Broom-broom" to show they are driving a vehicle, or "A-a-a-a--a-" to mimic the sound of a machine gun...or even "Woo-woo" to imitate an Emergency vehicle. (In fact modern children here in UK at least, call police/ambulance/firetrucks "Woo-woos" or "Woo-wahs" which is a very fine demonstration of how onomatopoeia works!)

And for anyone who's interested - it helps us to understand how language evolved in the first place: with sounds that represent certain objects/movements/sounds made.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Monday, November 13, 2017 3:49:15 AM

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Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 27,115
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Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
Hi Romany.

I wasn't meaning to say that 'racket' was the most onomatopoeic word on the list, just that it best described my mum's old pedal-driven sewing machine.

I just looked for a picture of it and found that it would be an antique and worth quite a bit!


************
I can see how most of these are vaguely based on onomatopoeic sounds, but your examples are so much more clear.

Roar, - I've seen an animal's roar written onomatopoeicly as "Wr-o-o-o-a-r" and so on.
I could accept 'howl' (as 'Ou-u-u-w' made into a word) - but not 'howling' as is on the list.

hum, twitter, rattle, rasp, whistle, swish, whir, zip, rumble, zoom, hiss, flop, thump, thud, gurgle, splash, ping, whoosh, patter, chirr, racket, babble, moan, tinkle, barking, click, whack, coo, gabble, jingle, sizzle, plop, hubbub, chirp, groan, howling, scream, murmur, whine, rustle, flutter, buzz, wheeze.

Bzzzz, coo, plop, hummmmm are quite good - but not scream, racket, barking or flutter, really.

Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Romany
Posted: Monday, November 13, 2017 6:42:57 AM
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Location: Brighton, England, United Kingdom
Drago,

I'd consider the list a list of "apt" words, just not uniformly words that sound like what they represent i.e. 'onomatopoeic' words.

I actually have one of those sewing machines now! When my place burnt down a colleague found it in her attic. As she has a new, modern one with all the bells and whistles, she asked if it would be any use for sewing curtains, etc. and I accepted gratefully.

If they're worth a bit now I must instruct my kids not to chuck it, but to sell it when I kark it!!
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Monday, November 13, 2017 7:06:00 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 27,115
Neurons: 149,215
Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
I just looked on e-bay - a quick scan.

There are two categories, antique and vintage, and a great variation in prices.

Just the machine (without the table, cast iron stand or treadle) can go for anything from £50 to £500.
Just the cast-iron base (with no table or machine) goes for £100 - £150.

Some really decrepit-looking ones in the 'vintage' section were £100 for the whole thing - cast-iron, tabletop and machine.

I would guess a working model, vintage, would sell for a couple of hundred if you painted the cast-iron black and restored the woodwork a bit.
An antique would be more.


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Romany
Posted: Monday, November 13, 2017 7:17:18 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/14/2009
Posts: 13,122
Neurons: 40,026
Location: Brighton, England, United Kingdom

Hmmm. Well as you know, Brighton is full of very up-market antique shops - going to go and have a shufti for myself. As I frequent Charity Shops the only ones I ever see are the banged up one for anything from 20 quid. And as they pre-date our period have none of the them on display where I work.
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