The Free Dictionary  
mailing list For webmasters
Welcome Guest Forum Search | Active Topics | Members

onomatopoeia #2 Options
D00M
Posted: Saturday, November 11, 2017 9:32:46 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/24/2017
Posts: 669
Neurons: 3,670
Hello respected teachers,

Are my answers to the following questions correct? There may be more than one correct answer for each question, so I need to learn all the possible answers that native speakers may use in the given context.

Fill in blanks with words from the following list.

Roar, hum, twitter, rattle, rasp, whistle, swish, whir, zip, rumble, zoom, hiss, flop, thump, thud, gurgle, splash, ping, whoosh, patter, chirr, racket, babble, moan, tinkle, barking, click, whack, coo, gabble, jingle, sizzle, plop, hubbub, chirp, groan, howling, scream, murmur, whine,rustle, flutter, buzz, wheeze.




13. The barking of a dog.
14. The babble of many voices.
15. The buzz of a bee.
16. The click of a beetle.
17. The thud of a dropped book.
18. The wheeze of wind in grass.
19. The?????? of an electric fan.
20. The rustle of dry leaves.
21. The ping of a bullet.
22. The roar of the storm.
23. The gurgle of water in pipe.
24. The coo of a nightingale.
25. The whir of wings.
26. The??????? of a motor.
27. The tinkle of the window in the wind.
28. The??????? of a tea kettle.

Next part here: http://forum.thefreedictionary.com/postst177528_onomatopoeia-3.aspx

I am looking forward to your answers.
thar
Posted: Saturday, November 11, 2017 9:48:01 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/8/2010
Posts: 15,869
Neurons: 63,570
I have removed the ones that fit, in my opinion, and left the probematic or incorrect ones.

13. The barking of a dog.
This is correct in meaning, but 'barking' is not particularly onomatopoeic, although it clearly originates from the sound. But true onomatopoeia is much closer to a real sound - a woof, or a yip, for example.


16. The click of a beetle.
Hmm - most beetles in my experience don't click, except click-beetles. So not exactly a useful expression.

17. The thud of a dropped book.
Or...


18. The wheeze of wind in grass.
Doesn't sound right to me. A wheeze is normally forced air, a high, squeezed sound. Like someone struggling to breathe.

19. The?????? of an electric fan.

21. The ping of a bullet.
Only in bad movies. Whistle
Or....


22. The roar of the storm.
A very serious storm. Wind roars, close up.
But what about a storm further away...
Or...

24. The coo of a nightingale.
Nightingales sing, they don't go 'coo'. A higher sound.


26. The??????? of a motor.
Depends on the motor. They make lots of different sounds!

27. The tinkle of the window in the wind.
A tinkle is the sound of water droplets (and a euphemism for urinating). It is gentle, light.
The window isn't making a 'tinkle' sound.

28. The??????? of a tea kettle.
This is possibly too old-fashioned for you. Or too American (for some reason, electric kettles do not seem to have reached the US.) Think of it boiling - the steam escapes through a special valve - what sound does it make to indicate it is boiling?



Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Saturday, November 11, 2017 12:16:16 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 27,115
Neurons: 149,215
Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
Some of these are definitely the normal phrase - so I won't mention those again - but they are correct. Applause

13. The normal phrase for a dog is actually 'bark', not 'barking'.
It is the same for other sounds, as thar says; 'a yip' not 'yipping'.
The '-ing' versions are used for a more continuous or general noise.
His dog's bark alerted him to an intruder.
The barking of the dogs in the courtyard alerted him to an intruder.

You could also use 'howl', 'howling' or 'racket' - depending on what it actually sounded like to you.

16. I've also never heard a beetle click. The only sound I've heard from a beetle is a 'whir' or 'buzz' (as they fly into a lighted room from the dark) and a 'thump', 'thud' or 'whack' (when they crash into the wall or window).

18. Wind in grass is usually said to 'sigh'. But that's not on your list.
If the grass is dry, it might 'rustle'. 'Murmur' may fit too.

19. A normal electric fan may 'whir'.
An unbalanced or broken one may rattle.

21. You don't normally hear a bullet flying really. I believe that a bullet may 'whir' or 'scream' after it has ricocheted and slowed down and is tumbling.
When it hits something, the sound depends on what it hits - 'splat' or 'whack' are the only ones on your list that I might use.

22. As thar says, it depends. Other possibilities (one's I've read or would not be surprised to see) are:
Rumble, racket, scream, howl.

24. Yes - the usual phrases would be "the song of a nightingale" and "the coo of a pigeon or dove".
None of the supplied words really fits that one.

26. Like aeroplanes and fans, motors have many sounds. It depends on power-source and size.

27. A window in the wind (if it is not fitted perfectly) rattles.

28. I haven't heard a tea-kettle whistle (or 'scream', some people may say) in many years.
However, thar is right. That's what was the expected answer.


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Users browsing this topic
Guest


Forum Jump
You cannot post new topics in this forum.
You cannot reply to topics in this forum.
You cannot delete your posts in this forum.
You cannot edit your posts in this forum.
You cannot create polls in this forum.
You cannot vote in polls in this forum.

Main Forum RSS : RSS
Forum Terms and Guidelines. Copyright © 2008-2017 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.