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she’s got quite a chassis Options
Luker4
Posted: Friday, November 10, 2017 3:03:36 PM

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Hello :)

She’s got quite a chassis


Is it a polite or rude thing to say ?
georgieporgie
Posted: Friday, November 10, 2017 3:34:08 PM
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Luker4 wrote:
Hello :)

She’s got quite a chassis

Is it a polite or rude thing to say ?


That was assinine.
thar
Posted: Friday, November 10, 2017 3:46:09 PM

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I don't think comparing a woman's body to the framework of a car could ever be considered respectful!


No, it is objectifying.

And very old-fashioned sounding, but that is another point entirely. Very 1950s. It brings to mind a time when big hips were considered sexier than they are today.

Unless you are actually talking about a car of course. In which case it is perfectly reasonable. Whistle
Wilmar (USA)
Posted: Friday, November 10, 2017 5:10:50 PM

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Very rude, which was the whole point of posting this, wasn't it.
almo 1
Posted: Friday, November 10, 2017 6:30:02 PM
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thar wrote:

Unless you are actually talking about a car of course. In which case it is perfectly reasonable. Whistle











Yeah, Christine has quite a chassis!

She 's gonna kill me!


almo 1
Posted: Friday, November 10, 2017 11:15:17 PM
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Romany
Posted: Saturday, November 11, 2017 4:40:42 AM
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Wilmar -

Luker is a serious English-learner who has been an active part of this forum for years. I would not think, for one moment, he is the kind of person who would deliberately be rude or offensive. If he asks, it's because he really wants to know.

Luker - it's a very, very old-fashioned phrase - one that appears in an old song called "If You Knew Suzie (Like I know Suzie)" . Back then, people just thought it funny - not offensive.

But times change and now the phrase is rather insulting for the reasons people have given above. (Oh, and by the way, it's not rude in a sexual way, but in a disrespectful way.)
Luker4
Posted: Saturday, November 11, 2017 10:42:57 AM

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I am very sorry if this was offensive. I learned a new word (this part of car) and there was also this expression in my dictionary app.

I've never heard such an expression and there was no information that it was rude. Usually they say when an expressions is rude or inappropriate. I simply thought it was old fashioned and I wanted to see what you think about it.

thanks for answers :)
palapaguy
Posted: Saturday, November 11, 2017 11:07:17 AM

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Luker, no need to apologize. Nowadays many of us are surprised to be told that what was acceptable to society since the beginning of time and up until yesterday is suddenly no longer acceptable. That's arrogance and merely their opinion - nothing more.
thar
Posted: Saturday, November 11, 2017 11:20:57 AM

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Luker4 wrote:
I am very sorry if this was offensive. I learned a new word (this part of car) and there was also this expression in my dictionary app.

I've never heard such an expression and there was no information that it was rude. Usually they say when an expressions is rude or inappropriate. I simply thought it was old fashioned and I wanted to see what you think about it.

thanks for answers :)


One, I, like Rom, know even if it had been offensive, you were asking a genuine question and not for shock value.
After all, sometimes you don't know unless you ask!
And it isn't offensive, as such. I mean, in the greater scheme of things. The words are certainly not rude, and even in this idiom it is not referring to anything sexual or immoral.
It is old-fashioned, and I don't know what women thought about it at the time, but it is of its time in objectifying the physical attributes of a woman - it was a compliment at the time, although I assume something you would say to your male mates than to the girl herself. But it was not meant to be particularly demeaning, at that time. It is just seen that way now. It is the overall thought that is disrespectful, rather than any words in that particular phrase. I mean, if you want to admire the physical attributes of a woman, you would probably get further comparing her to a beautiful object, rather than to the inner structure of a car! But the word has no greater meaning than that comparison. The word in itself is not rude in any way.

I certainly don't advise you to use it, as a modern male, but it would raise an eyebrow or a confused look for using it, rather than a slap or sexual harassment charge. (I would even go so far as to say a lot of younger people might not even understand what you meant.)
No big deal. You haven't said anything offensive. Just leave it in the 1950s where it belongs. Whistle

FounDit
Posted: Sunday, November 12, 2017 4:18:10 PM

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Luker4 wrote:
Hello :)

She’s got quite a chassis


Is it a polite or rude thing to say ?


As you probably know, men have a lot of sayings for describing a woman they think has a good body. This is just one of them that is from many years ago, as explained. So long as a woman doesn't hear you say any of these phrases, they can go on believing men no longer think this way.


A great many people will think they are thinking when they are merely rearranging their prejudices. ~ William James ~
Eoin Riedy
Posted: Sunday, November 12, 2017 9:30:13 PM

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"There’s none so classy as this fair lassie
Oh, oh, Holy Moses what a chassis!
We went riding, she didn’t balk
Back from Yonkers; I’m the one who had to walk"

- "If You Knew Susie" (lyrics by B. G. De Sylva, music by Joseph Meyer), interpolated into the score of Big Boy, 1925

Written for Al Jolson, it became a signature tune for Eddie Cantor. Performed here in English and French by Ella Shields:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c2l3SCFSRDI
Romany
Posted: Monday, November 13, 2017 5:35:06 AM
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Foundit, you said:

"So long as a woman doesn't hear you say any of these phrases, they can go on believing men no longer think this way."

Do you have regular friendships with younger people - or do you work every day with modern young men and women? Do you go out with a social group that includes people under 30?

What a lot of older men don't seem to accept is that things have changed remarkably since they were young. And it was the same when I was young myself: there were always older guys (the Dirty Old Men) who acted inappropriately.

The days of "men-only" discussions about a woman's sexuality - or lack thereof - are long-gone. Sure, some men still comment on passing women, or how they'd fancy going to bed with a particular one...but so do women too. For the average person sex is no longer a game where a man tries to get a woman into bed. It's a question of MUTUAL needs or wants. Women go out 'on the pull' as much as men.

I would not imagine there is a female on the planet who would think that men didn't objectify women at times, or talk about how their evening with a new partner went, or describe what they'd like to do with (note 'with' not 'to')them. Because women do exactly the same thing: sex is not an all-male pastime. Because they speak freely, in mixed groups, about these matters, they think very differently to their parents or grandparents. They understand that the sexual urge isn't a "man-thing" - the old ideas of predator and prey, of being "taken advantage of", of "men only want one thing", just don't exist anymore.

I DO understand that gender politics in the USA are at a different place to other first world countries. However I personally have never worked with, shared a house with or had a relationship with, any American under 30 who was did not think/feel the same as everyone else about social/sexual mores.

tunaafi
Posted: Monday, November 13, 2017 6:04:46 AM

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Romany wrote:
The days of "men-only" discussions about a woman's sexuality - or lack thereof - are long-gone.


Unfortunately, Romany, they are not completely gone. You,personally, may never have encountered an American under 30 who does not think modern about secual mores, but I have encountered younger Americans, Brits, Czechs and people of other nationalities who do think in the old way. I have been in bars and restaurants in Prague when young men on stag parties have talked openly and loudly (thinking they could not be understood) about their recent activities, and about what they would like to do to/with/for the attractive young waitress serving them.

We had a discussion in another thread some time ago when Hope assured me that men did not indulge in locker-room banter any more. Her evidence for this was that her husband had assured her that he had never heard such banter. What may modern thinking people don't always realise is the extent to which they mix only with similar-minded people.

'Men-only' discussions are far less prevalent than it used to be, particularly in environments in which teachers work (though I overheard some hair-raising stuff from teenagers of both sexes when I was still reaching in comprehensive schools in England in the late 1990s), but they still go on.

It was not just older men who thought it was acceptable to vote for a presidential candidate who boasted of his ability to thrust his tongue down womens' throats and grab their pussies. It's not just older men who threaten sexual violence against women in the news who have done something to upset their male vanities.


Romany
Posted: Monday, November 13, 2017 8:08:14 AM
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But last time we DID speak about this I pointed out that I was NOT basing my remarks on one sector of society.

From 2000 to 2006 I put myself through Uni by painting houses.During that entire time I was usually the only woman on building sites - unless my (female) boss was working with me. And, as the world knows - nothing much rougher than an Aussie artisan! And here, though I work at a museum, part of what I do is brick-laying, plastering, wall-making, and Heritage restoration - once again in an all male environment. When I'm not doing that I'm working and socialising with interns in their 20s from all over the world. And, as a writer, the demographic I write for is under 40 - if one wasn't reaching them one wouldn't get published.

I brought up four teenage boys (my two and the 2 foster-sons) and worked continually with street-boys - having an open house for any who needed it. I've also done a lot of Counselling of young men in Mental Health environments. So I don't only see the social side, but the troubled, confused and messed-up intimate sides, where all the "hidden" thoughts hang out.

With the greatest of respect (which I feel strongly for both Hope and her husband) it is not quite the same thing as asking one's husband!

I didn't say boys/men DON'T objectify women and talk about them as sexual beings....the point I was making - and have continued to make - is that women do it too. And that both men and women do it in mixed groups, quite openly and graphically. There's no 'men's talk' that must be kept hidden and that women must be protected from: it works both ways.

I am not saying that this is good, or that it's bad. It just IS. Even where I live, I'm the only person over 35 and am daily caught up in their lives and problems...and none of them have anything to do with men and women being on different 'sides' or acting differently in private with only men, or only women around.

And, along the same lines, there are still grotesque people who "take advantage" of others and treat members of the opposite sex badly. Of course there are: and always will be. But, again, that works both ways. It's not just "men's" behaviour, but done regardless of gender. Your tourist story of loutish behaviour isn't only confined to men, either: equally louche behaviour goes on with female tourists, too - ask anyone who's observed Brit package-tour hen parties in Spain!

My point has never been "Oh men aren't like that now: I have 2 sons so I know." My views aren't based on someone else's thoughts and experiences: they're based on the world I live in and the people I deal with, converse with, work with, socialise with on a daily basis.

It's worlds away from the world I used to live in as sexual prey!
FounDit
Posted: Monday, November 13, 2017 11:05:28 AM

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Romany wrote:

Foundit, you said:

"So long as a woman doesn't hear you say any of these phrases, they can go on believing men no longer think this way."

Do you have regular friendships with younger people - or do you work every day with modern young men and women? Do you go out with a social group that includes people under 30?
As a matter of fact, I do. I work at a college and have regular conversations with today's young people.

What a lot of older men don't seem to accept is that things have changed remarkably since they were young. And it was the same when I was young myself: there were always older guys (the Dirty Old Men) who acted inappropriately.
Oh, I know things have changed--somewhat. The language used by both sexes has changed dramatically. The behavior tolerated by both is also vastly different from that of my youth.

The days of "men-only" discussions about a woman's sexuality - or lack thereof - are long-gone. Sure, some men still comment on passing women, or how they'd fancy going to bed with a particular one...but so do women too. For the average person sex is no longer a game where a man tries to get a woman into bed. It's a question of MUTUAL needs or wants. Women go out 'on the pull' as much as men.
I think you may be projecting a bit onto me. I never said women didn't think in similar fashion, only that men still continue to judge a woman's body and looks, despite the current PC admonition not to do so, and the belief by many that condemning it makes it go away.

I would not imagine there is a female on the planet who would think that men didn't objectify women at times, or talk about how their evening with a new partner went, or describe what they'd like to do with (note 'with' not 'to')them. Because women do exactly the same thing: sex is not an all-male pastime. Because they speak freely, in mixed groups, about these matters, they think very differently to their parents or grandparents. They understand that the sexual urge isn't a "man-thing" - the old ideas of predator and prey, of being "taken advantage of", of "men only want one thing", just don't exist anymore.
Another bit of projecting. I never said the sexual urge was a predator/prey thing, but your comment about being "taken advantage of", and "men only want one thing", rings hollow when compared to the news out of Hollywood (Harvey Weinstein, et al.)

I DO understand that gender politics in the USA are at a different place to other first world countries. However I personally have never worked with, shared a house with or had a relationship with, any American under 30 who was did not think/feel the same as everyone else about social/sexual mores.
I would ask your pardon if I suspect those with whom you have such discussions don't adapt them to fit what they know to be your beliefs and ideas on the subject.

tunaafi is right on the money. Human nature hasn't really changed. That can be see as both good and bad, depending on the subject. It's similar to humans being the most intelligent creature on the planet and being a flaming idiot at the same time. We're intelligent enough to build machines that can take us off the planet, but stupid enough that we sometimes can't even talk to one another.



A great many people will think they are thinking when they are merely rearranging their prejudices. ~ William James ~
Hope123
Posted: Monday, November 13, 2017 11:48:59 AM

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The word chassis is just a euphemism and in my opinion no worse than bum or buttocks and better than many that might have been used. I see nothing wrong with any gender being appreciative of any person's body. I appreciate beauty when I see it anywhere in the world (including bodies of all genders) and may say so without needing derogatory words.

I am in female locker rooms where I've never heard sex discussed. We are too busy changing and exercising for much chatter. I am probably the oldest woman who goes regularly and I am pleased to see so many young people of both sexes looking after their bodies.

I have no idea what goes on in male locker rooms these days. Although I think I mentioned before that the day after the Trump "trash talk" video was released I overheard three males in the sauna room (which must be back to back with the female one) saying in various ways that Trump was disgraceful. They had no idea their voices carried, nor did I till then.

World food shortage that threatens five hundred million children could be alleviated at the cost of one day's warfare.
Hope123
Posted: Monday, November 13, 2017 12:12:41 PM

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I would also like to clarify and respond to something Tuna Wrote:

"We had a discussion in another thread some time ago when Hope assured me that men did not indulge in locker-room banter any more. Her evidence for this was that her husband had assured her that he had never heard such banter. What may modern thinking people don't always realise is the extent to which they mix only with similar-minded people."


Hope said nothing of the sort. She said she believed her husband when he said HE would not engage... See quotes below. He has heard it but he's not even in locker rooms anymore to know what goes on with younger males. She has been around long enough to understand the needs and goals of boys and men and how they sometimes talk and act and joke. I dont think that will ever disappear completely but men are beginning to realize they CAN discuss women and fantasize about sex without being derogatory. We aren't asking men not to be males expressing their desires but to do without the negativity and to not act without consent. If we were to condemn people for their thoughts, we'd all be in jail.

It is amazing that once the Weinstein story broke many men in ALL WALKS OF LIFE are being accused of far more than trash talk and admitting culpability. And millions of women under the #MeToo hashtag are coming forward about incidents in their lives where the men are not famous - just had POWER over them in their jobs. Some men are just now realizing and writing articles and blogs that their actions as younger men were inappropriate and they are now seeing things differently.


The point was that the more confident a male is in his masculinity and sexuality, the less he feels the need to trash talk women to feel POWERFUL (or even look at porn), and the more likely he is to have loving relationships. Therefore we need to educate both genders and also give all children self confidence.

As Tuna says about mixing only with similar-minded people, I can't generalize and was not generalizing, that the way men in my life behave are representative of how all men are. I just need to go read some responses on Twitter to see the names both genders call both genders to realize that.

:::::
Here are some pertinent excerpts by Hope from that thread that was about making excuses about Trump's "locker room talk" because 'many men do it' and blaming women by mentioning "groupies"who 'ask for it' when the issue was about consent, not trash talk.

https://forum.thefreedictionary.com/postst155829_This-is-Reprehensible-.aspx


"It wasn't just trash talk. The worst thing he (Trump) said was not slang for genitals - it was that his "stardom" puts him beyond needing consent!

...I believe my husband when he says he has not and would not engage in that kind of talk even when younger and with his buddies. And he worked in construction and drove truck as summer jobs when he was in school. He's a self confident man who treats everyone with respect, yet is no pushover.

...Furthermore, IMCO, engaging in that kind of talk encourages and is what helps to create disrespectful attitudes and even behaviors of some men towards women. The smutty objectification creates hostile environments for women.

...You may not know but I do know my own husband after all these years. I'm not so naive as to think that my husband has never lied to me, or that groups of men (and women) don't often talk like that. Children learn to lie around age two. Adults just get better at it. Also, I'm sure you are right that my husband has heard such talk, but there really are some men who don't need to prove they are a man and don't need to join in. That's what locker room talk is - bragging to the guys to prove you are a man. It used to be thought that a real man doesn't kiss and tell. Maybe that's old-fashioned now.

...There is nothing wrong with either gender fantasizing about others while married. Men shouldn't think that women don't do it too. But fantasizing in general is not the topic here. It is the attitude. And he's on thin ice when he accuses Hillary of Bill's misdeeds as it is she who is running plus we do know Trump had affairs, and his first wife downgraded a charge of rape to 'rough sex'. Nobody knows exactly what happened (as in any marriage) but she did divorce him.

...I asked my husband again about the men on the construction site - he said he actually laughingly said to them that they couldn't construct a sentence without the f word in it. They lasted about five minutes and then were back at it. But he said although they cursed and swore and talked dirty some times, even they did not talk about the entitlement of taking sexual liberties without consent.

...Maybe it will take some generations yet of parents teaching their sons and daughters how to respect all other people, no matter their gender, transgender, sexual orientation, race, color, creed, or religion. As well, IMCO, respect for a partner by both partners in a marriage or relationship is what makes a marriage or relationship last - or at least is a huge factor as disrespect will hasten the end. (Edited - a psychology study showed that interviewers could predict with a high degree of certainty if a marriage would last by watching to see if there was name-calling during an argument. Those who did it were nearly all divorced in five years.)

...There are enough of us around who have started already to teach our children to respect people. Children learn by watching and they learn early. And they will often do back to society what is done to them as children. I cringe when I see how some people use their power and treat their children miserably out in public. And then wonder what happens to them in private, and what kind of adults they become. I also see many loving parents and wonder the same about the attitudes the children will have as adults."




World food shortage that threatens five hundred million children could be alleviated at the cost of one day's warfare.
Romany
Posted: Monday, November 13, 2017 12:38:56 PM
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Foundit - No, I wasn't projecting but regressing, I think.

When we originally discussed this, about a year ago, I remember being frustrated; and wanting to jump up and down in the grip of that frustration! I think perhaps my brain leapt back to *that* discussionSick

See, I don't even understand why Weinstein has any bearing on anythingd'oh!

Obviously, we all have our own lived experiences which shape our perceptions. And yours, Tuna's and mine just differ. Not surprising as we have, all three, been shaped by different cultures and precepts.

So I shouldn't have resurrected that discussion in my head, even unconsciously as it must have been when I posted above.Anxious
almo 1
Posted: Tuesday, November 14, 2017 11:34:21 AM
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Lola




I met her in a club down in old Soho
Where you drink champagne and it tastes just like cherry-cola/Coca-Cola

She walked up to me and she asked me to dance
I asked her her name and in a dark brown voice she said Lola
L O L A Lola la-la-la-la Lola

Well I'm not the world's most physical guy
But when she squeezed me tight she nearly broke my spine
Oh my Lola la-la-la-la Lola
Well I'm not dumb but I can't understand
Why she walk like a woman but talk like a man
Oh my Lola la-la-la-la Lola la-la-la-la Lola

Well we drank champagne and danced all night
Under electric candlelight
She picked me up and sat me on her knee
And said little boy won't you come home with me
Well I'm not the world's most passionate guy
But when I looked in her eyes well I almost fell for my Lola
La-la-la-la Lola la-la-la-la Lola
Lola la-la-la-la Lola la-la-la-la Lola






Luker4
Posted: Thursday, November 16, 2017 12:02:29 PM

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Thank you all :)

It's strange that you spell singular and plural the same way. This word is surely a curious one.


I would never use that word in such context, I respect women, maybe just playfully Think , but I am not a grat fun of cars and I can't think of a scenario, in which I would think of this particular car part in a romantic situation. Maybe if I dated a mechanic Think But in that case she would be the one to bring this up Whistle

Romany
Posted: Thursday, November 16, 2017 12:24:21 PM
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Indeed - I don't think you'd be alone with your dilemma, Luker!

Anyway, don't worry about it - as has been explained: it was a line from a song that became popular a long time ago and then, as old songs do, fell out of fashion and was forgotten...until the day a lone ESL speaker chanced upon it and set it free.
thar
Posted: Thursday, November 16, 2017 12:34:53 PM

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Chassis? Blame the French.

It is actually an interesting word

'Box' in all its many forms...


French:
caisse f (plural caisses)
box
cash register
fund
bank
(colloquial) car


châsse f (plural châsses)

reliquary
coffin
Derived terms:
châssis
From Old French chasse, from Late Latin capsa, from Classical Latin capsus, whence also the doublets casse and caisse. The circumflex is to distinguish it from chasse rather than etymological.


châssis m (plural châssis)
chassis, frame
(Quebec, Acadian, Louisiana) window

caisson m (plural caissons)
box


English
Chassis (vehicle frame)

Case (container) > briefcase, display case, staircase.

Caisson
To me, an enclosure to work in that keeps out water, such as when you build bridge supports;
or the box carried behind a horse-drawn cannon.
But lots of other meanings...

caisson (plural caissons)

(engineering) An enclosure from which water can be expelled, in order to give access to underwater areas for engineering works etc.
The gate across the entrance to a dry dock.
(nautical) A floating tank that can be submerged, attached to an underwater object and then pumped out to lift the object by buoyancy; a camel.
(military) A two-wheeled, horse-drawn military vehicle used to carry ammunition (and a coffin at funerals).
(military) A large box to hold ammunition.
(military) A chest filled with explosive materials, used like a mine.
(architecture) A coffer.

Whistle

Luker4
Posted: Saturday, November 18, 2017 2:01:28 PM

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Recently I've heard that if a word is French it must be romantic. I am happy to have found a proof that it is not always the case. :)
thar
Posted: Saturday, November 18, 2017 4:13:36 PM

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Ah, toujours l'amour.

It is a good bet. Anglo-Saxon is good at earthy and real, but shies away from anything too emotional. Using French creates a distance and a romance.
From a rendezvous to an affaire [de coeur], from a contretemps to a ménage à trois, you can get away with so much more when it is in French. It makes the grubby sound romantic and exotic.

Cul de sac, on the other hand, not so much. Whistle


What it is is more expensive.
A Ferrari has a chassis - a wooden go-cart has a frame.
And guess what - that is Anglo-Saxon.Whistle

Quote:

Frame
From Middle English framen, fremen, fremmen (“to construct, build, strengthen, refresh, perform, execute, profit, avail”), from Old English framian, fremian, fremman (“to profit, avail, advance, perform, promote, execute, commit, do”), f


These things are all about register.
Remember, the Normans won in 1066, and French became the language of power for a couple of centuries. Eventually it got subsumed into a greater English, but the difference in register still remains.
For everything in English there are two words - one Anglo-Saxon for daily use and one French kept for Sunday best.Whistle
(And a Greek one for science).
Romany
Posted: Saturday, November 18, 2017 7:11:39 PM
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And a Latin one for botany.
Romany
Posted: Saturday, November 18, 2017 7:11:40 PM
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And a Latin one for botany.
Luker4
Posted: Sunday, November 19, 2017 4:29:16 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 11/19/2013
Posts: 4,168
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Location: Wrocław Pracze, Lower Silesian Voivodeship, Poland
[thar wrote:]


What it is is more expensive.
A Ferrari has a chassis - a wooden go-cart has a frame.
And guess what - that is Anglo-Saxon.Whistle



That is a great comparison!

So if not romantic, French words have usually more sophisticated meaning than their Anglo-Saxon counterparts :)



"cul-de-sac" that's a nice word to learn :D I am sure I've seen it in a Robert Ludlum's book but didn't know what that meant Whistle Thanks Applause
FounDit
Posted: Sunday, November 19, 2017 9:56:29 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/19/2011
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Yeah, "cul-de-sac" doesn't bring to mind quite the same imagery as "dead end"...Whistle


A great many people will think they are thinking when they are merely rearranging their prejudices. ~ William James ~
whatson
Posted: Sunday, November 19, 2017 10:21:51 AM
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Joined: 2/19/2016
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Neurons: 2,359
Location: Toronto, Ontario, Canada
*
FYI
Two examples how other languages solved
this extremely sensitive issue (in translation):

blind streetlet (dimin. because never a major thoroughfare)
sackstreet
*

If I were a lame 'un, I wouldn't advertise it.
Romany
Posted: Sunday, November 19, 2017 10:29:44 AM
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Joined: 6/14/2009
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Location: Brighton, England, United Kingdom

Oh - I absolutely *love* "blind streetlet".

Poor wee thing, stumbling about trying to find out where all the big streets have gone!
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