The Free Dictionary  
mailing list For webmasters
Welcome Guest Forum Search | Active Topics | Members

with the opportunity to exploit vs while exploiting Options
Carmenex
Posted: Friday, November 10, 2017 11:09:06 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 1/7/2014
Posts: 1,002
Neurons: 5,289
Hi, I would please ask you which of the expressions in bold is correct in the following (or, if you would suggest a different wording):
This career path would provide me with a fruitful, multidisciplinary interaction with other specialists across the company, (and with the opportunity to exploit)/(while exploiting) the breadth of my education, which I believe to be one of the strong points of my expertise.

FounDit
Posted: Saturday, November 11, 2017 10:55:30 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/19/2011
Posts: 9,540
Neurons: 50,645
Carmenex wrote:
Hi, I would please ask you which of the expressions in bold is correct in the following (or, if you would suggest a different wording):

I suggest:
This career path would provide me with a fruitful, multidisciplinary interaction with other specialists across the company, and with the opportunity to exploit the breadth of my education, which I believe to be one of the strong points of my expertise.



You could exploit the breadth of your education in many ways, but this career path offers an "opportunity" to do so. I struck out "with" because I felt it unnecessary and a bit awkward.



We should look to the past to learn from it, not destroy our future because of it — FounDit
Carmenex
Posted: Tuesday, November 14, 2017 11:29:43 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 1/7/2014
Posts: 1,002
Neurons: 5,289
FounDit wrote:
Carmenex wrote:
Hi, I would please ask you which of the expressions in bold is correct in the following (or, if you would suggest a different wording):

I suggest:
This career path would provide me with a fruitful, multidisciplinary interaction with other specialists across the company, and with the opportunity to exploit the breadth of my education, which I believe to be one of the strong points of my expertise.



You could exploit the breadth of your education in many ways, but this career path offers an "opportunity" to do so. I struck out "with" because I felt it unnecessary and a bit awkward.



Hi FounDit, and thank you for your advice.
I would please ask you if the expressions in bold are correct in the following (it is a bullet list):
• gained experience and competence in using/employing/(dealing with) high power current supplies, thermometry, voltage sensors, and any instrumentation used to set up and conduct prototype and system testing
worked on optimising the production process of doped semiconductor and superconductor materials, and on characterizing these materials including:
- evaluation of their mechanical, electrical, thermal and optical properties
- analysis of their chemical composition and surface structure by using XRD, electron microscopy (TEM, SEM, EDX), etc.
Carmenex
Posted: Wednesday, July 25, 2018 10:10:47 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 1/7/2014
Posts: 1,002
Neurons: 5,289
Hi FounDit, I would please ask you if the expressions in bold are all correct and whether they have the same meaning in the following (it is a bullet list):

• worked on the optimisation of the production processes of metallic, ceramic and composite materials, including superconducting and semiconducting materials, and on the characterisation of such materials, which entailed:
o analysis of their chemical composition and surface structure (by using)/using/(by means of) techniques such as XRD, X-ray fluorescence, spectroscopy, optical microscopy, electron microscopy (TEM, SEM, EDX), etc.
o ...
TMe
Posted: Wednesday, July 25, 2018 11:09:04 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 1/12/2017
Posts: 779
Neurons: 4,943
Instead of exploit, I would suggest the word' explore'

Mike Miller, the celebrated English teacher observes;

To explore: research, look for, venture out into new situations or areas of interest.

The scientist explored the new planet.

The reasons behind colonialism were explored by the students.

To exploit: Use for one’s own purposes; take advantage of

The strong football team exploited the weaknesses of its opponents.

While playing tennis, she exploited the injury of the other player.

Using one’s wealth to gain power and influence is an example of exploitation.


I am a layman.
FounDit
Posted: Wednesday, July 25, 2018 3:05:10 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/19/2011
Posts: 9,540
Neurons: 50,645
Carmenex wrote:
Hi FounDit, I would please ask you if the expressions in bold are all correct and whether they have the same meaning in the following (it is a bullet list):
While I think all three of them would work, "using" and "by means of" would be the most common, IMO. My personal choice would be "by means of".

TMe:
I wouldn't change "exploit" to "explore" since to explore something indicates an unknown area, and the education of the individual would not be unknown. Therefore, "exploit" fits since it means to take advantage of something for one's own purpose. To exploit someone else would be wrong, but to exploit something of a personal achievement that the person has worked hard to attain would be okay.



• worked on the optimisation of the production processes of metallic, ceramic and composite materials, including superconducting and semiconducting materials, and on the characterisation of such materials, which entailed:
o analysis of their chemical composition and surface structure (by using)/using/(by means of) techniques such as XRD, X-ray fluorescence, spectroscopy, optical microscopy, electron microscopy (TEM, SEM, EDX), etc.
o ...


We should look to the past to learn from it, not destroy our future because of it — FounDit
Carmenex
Posted: Thursday, July 26, 2018 8:33:15 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 1/7/2014
Posts: 1,002
Neurons: 5,289
Hi TMe and FounDit, and thank you for your suggestions.
To FounDit: however, from a grammatical point of view, by using is correct, isn't it?
With what expression would you replace such materials in order to avoid repeating materials? Or, would you keep it in?
I would also please to ask you if the following sentence correct (or, you would suggest a different wording?):
Will she need to submit the form again? Or, since she has already submitted it on this occasion, will she not need to?
FounDit
Posted: Thursday, July 26, 2018 3:51:05 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/19/2011
Posts: 9,540
Neurons: 50,645
Carmenex wrote:
Hi TMe and FounDit, and thank you for your suggestions.
To FounDit: however, from a grammatical point of view, by using is correct, isn't it?
Yes, there would be no problem with that.

With what expression would you replace such materials in order to avoid repeating materials? Or, would you keep it in?
If you want to avoid repetition of the word "materials", you could say,
"...including superconducting and semiconducting materials, and their characterisation, which..."

I would also please to ask you if the following sentence correct (or, you would suggest a different wording?):
Will she need to submit the form again? Or, since she has already submitted it on this occasion, will she not need to?

There are any number of ways to say this. One that occurs to me first is: "Will she need to submit the form again? Or, having done so already on this occasion, is another necessary?"


We should look to the past to learn from it, not destroy our future because of it — FounDit
Carmenex
Posted: Friday, July 27, 2018 8:44:10 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 1/7/2014
Posts: 1,002
Neurons: 5,289
FounDit wrote:
Carmenex wrote:
Hi TMe and FounDit, and thank you for your suggestions.
To FounDit: however, from a grammatical point of view, by using is correct, isn't it?
Yes, there would be no problem with that.

With what expression would you replace such materials in order to avoid repeating materials? Or, would you keep it in?
If you want to avoid repetition of the word "materials", you could say,
"...including superconducting and semiconducting materials, and their characterisation, which..."

I would also please to ask you if the following sentence correct (or, you would suggest a different wording?):
Will she need to submit the form again? Or, since she has already submitted it on this occasion, will she not need to?

There are any number of ways to say this. One that occurs to me first is: "Will she need to submit the form again? Or, having done so already on this occasion, is another necessary?"


Thank you, FounDit. I have noticed that you omitted the preposition on before their characterisation. Therefore, is it clear that their characterisation depends on worked on, even if the on before it is omitted?
And, in your opinion, which one of the following options in bold (if any) are correct:
"Will she need to submit the form again? Or, having done so already on this occasion, is it not necessary (to do it?)/(is she exempted from doing it)?"
FounDit
Posted: Friday, July 27, 2018 10:23:17 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/19/2011
Posts: 9,540
Neurons: 50,645
Carmenex wrote:
FounDit wrote:
Carmenex wrote:
Hi TMe and FounDit, and thank you for your suggestions.
To FounDit: however, from a grammatical point of view, by using is correct, isn't it?
Yes, there would be no problem with that.

With what expression would you replace such materials in order to avoid repeating materials? Or, would you keep it in?
If you want to avoid repetition of the word "materials", you could say,
"...including superconducting and semiconducting materials, and their characterisation, which..."

I would also please to ask you if the following sentence correct (or, you would suggest a different wording?):
Will she need to submit the form again? Or, since she has already submitted it on this occasion, will she not need to?

There are any number of ways to say this. One that occurs to me first is: "Will she need to submit the form again? Or, having done so already on this occasion, is another necessary?"


Thank you, FounDit. I have noticed that you omitted the preposition on before their characterisation. Therefore, is it clear that their characterisation depends on worked on, even if the on before it is omitted?
Yes, because you are saying, "worked on the optimization of _____ and their characterizations - two different things.

And, in your opinion, which one of the following options in bold (if any) are correct:
"Will she need to submit the form again? Or, having done so already on this occasion, is it not necessary ?"
Of the ones listed, I would choose this one.



We should look to the past to learn from it, not destroy our future because of it — FounDit
Users browsing this topic
Guest


Forum Jump
You cannot post new topics in this forum.
You cannot reply to topics in this forum.
You cannot delete your posts in this forum.
You cannot edit your posts in this forum.
You cannot create polls in this forum.
You cannot vote in polls in this forum.

Main Forum RSS : RSS
Forum Terms and Guidelines | Privacy policy | Copyright © 2008-2018 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.