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Koh Elaine
Posted: Wednesday, November 08, 2017 9:43:26 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/4/2012
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We met each other on/in the plane.

Can either preposition be used?

Thanks.
Wilmar (USA)
Posted: Wednesday, November 08, 2017 10:07:10 AM

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Location: Vinton, Iowa, United States
We met each other on the plane.
pjharvey
Posted: Wednesday, November 08, 2017 10:08:48 AM
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We met on the plane.
"Each other" is wrong here!
Romany
Posted: Wednesday, November 08, 2017 10:49:00 AM
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Location: Brighton, England, United Kingdom

pj - why do you think 'each other' is wrong? And what would you put in its place?
NKM
Posted: Wednesday, November 08, 2017 11:36:57 AM

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Location: Corinth, New York, United States
Tricky little things, these prepositions.

We met each other on the plane, on the ship, on Thursday, on the twelfth of June.

We met each other in the hotel lobby, in the garden, in the evening, in September.

We met each other at the airport, at three o'clock, at my brother's house, at a family reunion.

We met each other last Friday, last week, this morning, yesterday, last year. (No preposition needed)



(And there's nothing wrong with "met each other".)

Koh Elaine
Posted: Wednesday, November 08, 2017 11:46:16 AM
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Joined: 7/4/2012
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Neurons: 10,841
Thanks to all of you.
AndreWN
Posted: Wednesday, November 08, 2017 11:01:09 PM

Rank: Newbie

Joined: 11/8/2017
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Neurons: 45
Hi !

"On the plane" is correct.
Usually when you mention public transportation you use "on": On the bus, on the plane, on the ship.
With private or small vehicles you should use "in": in the car, in the boat.

You can say either "we met" or "we met each other".
You can use "each other" to emphasize who you met, but it's not necessary.
=)
palapaguy
Posted: Wednesday, November 08, 2017 11:27:05 PM

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Joined: 10/28/2013
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Location: Calabasas, California, United States
Excellent! English is a living, evolving organism. All notions that it is an established science that obeys "rules" are, well, simply wrong.
dave freak
Posted: Saturday, November 11, 2017 2:52:34 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 4/29/2013
Posts: 1,617
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There was a time I couldn't understand why English people say 'on the bus', 'on the tram' etc, either. It sounded as if they had been on the roof of a particular means of transport. One English speaker once explained it to me. He told me that "on" is used with public transportation to mean 'on board'. Does it make sense? Anyway, I've used it correctly since then. Dancing (although my native language wants me to use 'in'.)
Koh Elaine
Posted: Saturday, November 11, 2017 3:17:20 AM
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Joined: 7/4/2012
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Neurons: 10,841
I think, strictly speaking, "in the bus", "in the tram" are both correct.
thar
Posted: Saturday, November 11, 2017 3:50:24 AM

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Joined: 7/8/2010
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The prepositions are used for different reasons.

How you are travelling:
On the bus, train, boat
(On board is a very good way of explaining that.)








On London transport pregnant women can get badge to help people know to offer them a seat.




Or 2
your placement in space.
In/on/under/beside the bus.
That is not relevant. If you are travelling on the we can assume you are sitting or standing on a floor surface, not surfing on the roof. It is not necessary to specify you are in the bus.
If you are on one of those trains in some countires where people hang on to the otsdide or sit on the oof, then your position might be relevant - you are inside the train, or hanging onto the outside, or sitting on top.
That is your relative position.
But not the point of the preposition here.



A car, you don't board, you don't get on.
A car, you get in. You are in the car or not in the car.
That does equate with position.
A var is a recent thing - before that would be a carriage. There, the difference between getting in (the passenger, in a seat) or getting on (the driver) would be relevant. A car is a 'horseless carriage' that you drive yourself. You get in it to do that.

If you left your briefcase in the car, it is on the seat, where you were. If you left it on the car, you put it on the roof for a moment but left it there.







Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Saturday, November 11, 2017 4:43:12 AM

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Joined: 9/21/2009
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Location: Helsinki, Southern Finland Province, Finland
Old busses were like this:



So, you really were sitting ON them, not IN ;-)


In the beginning there was nothing, which exploded.
Ashwin Joshi
Posted: Monday, November 13, 2017 12:07:27 PM

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Location: Jandiāla Guru, Punjab, India
How about 'inside the plane'?


Me Gathering Pebbles at The Seashore.-Aj
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