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yanks and yanks Options
Jose Mourinho
Posted: Wednesday, November 08, 2017 5:08:04 AM

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What does "yanks and yanks" mean in this context?

With the torch to help me I investigated further. There were bottles and cases of queer-smelling stuffs, chemicals no doubt for experiments, and there were coils of fine copper wire and yanks and yanks of thin oiled silk.
Romany
Posted: Wednesday, November 08, 2017 5:14:32 AM
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Location: Brighton, England, United Kingdom

The only thing I can think of is that it is a repeated typo?

Perhaps it should have been "hanks" which would fit in much better with thin oiled silk.

Or perhaps it should have been "yards and yards" which is much more natural.
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Wednesday, November 08, 2017 5:24:30 AM

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Romany
Posted: Wednesday, November 08, 2017 5:49:36 AM
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Joined: 6/14/2009
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Oh well, perhaps he coined a neologism for the purpose. (Or maybe there's a whole vocabulary dealing with textiles that we're unfamiliar with?)
shass
Posted: Wednesday, November 08, 2017 4:40:25 PM
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A "Hank" of cotton or silk is about 840 yards, but it is coiled.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Wednesday, November 08, 2017 6:48:21 PM

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I cannot see it as a mis-spelling of 'yards', which does not really fit with the rest of the sentence.

"Hanks" sounds correct - chemicals are sold in bottles, wire is sold in coils and silk is sold in hanks (or on bobbins).



Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Romany
Posted: Thursday, November 09, 2017 12:08:22 PM
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Location: Brighton, England, United Kingdom

Ah ye gods, Drago,

So firmly fixed am I in the world of 19thC textiles I wasn't even *thinking* of oiled silk thread. I was thinking of the bales and bales of silk materials shipped over in the wake of George III's "Chinoiserie" revolution!

Talk about one-directional!!
Jose Mourinho
Posted: Thursday, November 09, 2017 3:06:10 PM

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Neurons: 85
Drag0nspeaker, Romany, shass
thanks for your help!
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Thursday, November 09, 2017 6:02:52 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
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Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
Romany wrote:
Ah ye gods, Drago,
So firmly fixed am I in the world of 19thC textiles I wasn't even *thinking* of oiled silk thread. I was thinking of the bales and bales of silk materials shipped over in the wake of
George III's "Chinoiserie" revolution!
Talk about one-directional!!

All a matter of upbringing. Dancing

My dad was a foreman/chemist in a dye-works. All the work was done on the raw threads straight from the spinning-mills - before they became 'textiles'.

By the age of ten I "knew all about" colours, dyes and types of thread - why the workers hated working on the indigo for blue-jeans (it had to boil and it stunk of sulphur) - the differences
between dyeing silk and cotton, etc.

But now it's a dying trade. Whistle d'oh!

**************
Oiled silk thread was used as an insulator in early electrical work, and you can still get it.




Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
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