The Free Dictionary  
mailing list For webmasters
Welcome Guest Forum Search | Active Topics | Members

drink Options
onsen
Posted: Friday, November 03, 2017 9:08:40 PM
Rank: Member

Joined: 9/14/2017
Posts: 60
Neurons: 1,945
Hello,

drink n
1 [C] an amount of liquid that you drink, or the act of drinking something: [+ of]
a Have a drink of water.
b Do you want a drink of my tea?
c He took a drink of his coffee.
(Longman Exams Dictionary)

Of the three sentences above, does the noun 'drink' in b and c mean the act of drinking something?

Thank you
palapaguy
Posted: Friday, November 03, 2017 10:24:00 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 10/28/2013
Posts: 435
Neurons: 7,233
Location: Calabasas, California, United States
onsen wrote:
Hello,

drink n
1 [C] an amount of liquid that you drink, or the act of drinking something: [+ of]
a Have a drink of water.
Here, "drink" means an amount of liquid in the container.

b Do you want a drink of my tea?
Here, same as (a).

c He took a drink of his coffee.
(Longman Exams Dictionary)
Here, this refers to the act of drinking

Yeah, you're right. It can be confusing.

Of the three sentences above, does the noun 'drink' in b and c mean the act of drinking something?

Thank you
Romany
Posted: Saturday, November 04, 2017 8:01:17 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/14/2009
Posts: 13,172
Neurons: 40,153
Location: Brighton, England, United Kingdom

Onsen - those sentences provided above are not at all good illustrations.

"Have a drink of water" just means to go and drink some water. It needn't be in a container, it could be from a tap a stream, a river etc.

"Do you want a drink of my tea?" is a most unlikely English sentence; which sounds like someone is being asked if they want to share/drink from the same cup as someone else?

"He took a drink of his coffee" is also a weird sentence. One normally takes a sip or a gulp of one's coffee?

Of course, this might, yet again, be a BE/AE thing, so perhaps we (I include myself because now I'm curious) should see what AE speakers think about it?
onsen
Posted: Saturday, November 04, 2017 8:55:03 AM
Rank: Member

Joined: 9/14/2017
Posts: 60
Neurons: 1,945
Romany wrote:
Onsen - those sentences provided above are not at all good illustrations.


Thank you very much, Romany.

Before posting, I felt some oddity about 'my tea' and 'his coffee'. I thought they were producers of coffee.
Romany
Posted: Saturday, November 04, 2017 9:04:47 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/14/2009
Posts: 13,172
Neurons: 40,153
Location: Brighton, England, United Kingdom

Exactly! When I read them the first time I thought along the same lines.
Users browsing this topic
Guest


Forum Jump
You cannot post new topics in this forum.
You cannot reply to topics in this forum.
You cannot delete your posts in this forum.
You cannot edit your posts in this forum.
You cannot create polls in this forum.
You cannot vote in polls in this forum.

Main Forum RSS : RSS
Forum Terms and Guidelines. Copyright © 2008-2017 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.