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Defining Prepositional Idioms Options
Daemon
Posted: Thursday, October 12, 2017 12:00:00 AM
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Defining Prepositional Idioms

Many prepositions can be used with certain words or phrases to form idioms (expressions that have a unique meaning that cannot be inferred from their constituent parts). Prepositional idioms can function adverbially, adjectivally, or verbally. Where can they appear in a sentence? More...
raghd muhi al-deen
Posted: Thursday, October 12, 2017 8:24:23 AM

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Prepositions in Idioms
Definition
Many prepositions can be used with certain words or phrases to form idioms (expressions that have a unique meaning that cannot be inferred from their constituent parts). These prepositional idioms typically begin or end with a preposition. Prepositional idioms can function adverbially, adjectivally, or verbally and may come at the beginning, middle, or end of a sentence. For example:

“Look after the children, please.” (verbal idiom at the beginning of a sentence)
“She plays tennis on average three times a month.” (adverbial idiom in the middle of a sentence)
“All the elevators are out of order.” (adjectival idiom at the end of a sentence)

Types of idioms
Prepositional idioms combine prepositions with verbs, nouns, or phrases to create idiomatic expressions. These expressions can be divided into two categories: idioms that start with prepositions and idioms that end with prepositions.
Idioms that start with prepositions
Idioms that start with prepositions form prepositional phrases, and so they function adverbially or adjectivally. For example:

“Chuck visits his grandparents from time to time.” (adverbial prepositional phrase)
“The city is in danger.” (adjectival prepositional phrase)
“Answer me at once.” (adverbial prepositional phrase)

Certain idiomatic prepositional phrases can behave both adverbially and adjectivally. For example, look at how the prepositional idiom in depth is used below:

“He researches rainforests in depth.” (In depth is an adverbial prepositional phrase that modifies the verb researches.)
“He conducts in-depth research of rainforests.” (In-depth* is an adjectival prepositional phrase that modifies the noun research.)

(*We usually insert a hyphen when an adjective consists of two or more words and comes directly before the noun it modifies.)

with my pleasure
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