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North Korea keeps declaring "We're at war!" When is the response going to come? Options
Chazlee
Posted: Friday, September 15, 2017 1:43:11 AM
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Joined: 7/24/2016
Posts: 408
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The reports are beyond disturbing. The latest one is that "For the second time in a month, North Korea has launched a missile over Japanese airspace, U.S. Pacific Command confirmed Thursday evening."

Ok, NK has openly declared war on its perceived enemies, yet there seems to be no real response at all from those "enemies." If not stopped, the odds are NK is going to successfully hit one of their targets and people are going to die. It's going to happen.

The time has come for a stronger response to NK than simply sanctions, which have done nothing to stop Kim's madness.

Peace.
Chazlee.

https://www.yahoo.com/gma/north-korea-launches-missile-over-japanese-airspace-u-031405438--abc-news-topstories.html
Sarrriesfan
Posted: Friday, September 15, 2017 2:41:17 AM

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Location: Luton, England, United Kingdom
North Korea has been at war since the start of the Korean War, there was an armistice signed by both sides but never a peace treaty.

I lack the imagination for a witty signature.
Chazlee
Posted: Friday, September 15, 2017 2:47:37 AM
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Joined: 7/24/2016
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Sarrriesfan wrote:
North Korea has been at war since the start of the Korean War, there was an armistice signed by both sides but never a peace treaty.


Kim's behavior is quite different from his dad and granddad.
Y111
Posted: Friday, September 15, 2017 2:50:09 AM
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Location: Kurgan, Kurgan, Russia
Chazlee wrote:

The time has come for a stronger response to NK than simply sanctions, which have done nothing to stop Kim's madness.

What response do you want?
Chazlee
Posted: Friday, September 15, 2017 3:23:08 AM
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Joined: 7/24/2016
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Y111 wrote:
Chazlee wrote:

The time has come for a stronger response to NK than simply sanctions, which have done nothing to stop Kim's madness.

What response do you want?


Y111, That is a very difficult question which I have given much thought to in recent times. Yet, since I do believe that he is not going to stop lobbing his missiles at those he seeks to destroy, it seems the only option is a military attack upon NK. What other options are there? He is not stopping, and I don't think he will stop until he has successfully hit a target, which is also going to result in civilian casualties. I think an attack upon NK at this point in time is more than justified.

Recently, I read a report that Kim loves wine, and he drinks a lot of it. It is likely that Kim enjoys other types of alcohol, and even possibly some types of drugs. I think it is possible that Kim could be an alcoholic, and thus his aggressive behavior may be fueled by being drunk all the time, or maybe he is stoned on drugs. Thus, if this were the case, he would be very difficult to reason with, and that is why he will not cease in his reckless behavior.

So, I think the time for military strikes against NK has arrived. I can see no other options at this time.

Peace.
Chazlee.
TheParser
Posted: Thursday, September 28, 2017 5:37:09 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/21/2012
Posts: 4,674
Neurons: 22,062
As world leaders decide how to handle Marshal Kim, they may wish to pay close attention to psychological and culture profiles of the enemy.

1. A Central Intelligence Agency (the American spy organization) profile says that Marshal Kim has "a massive ego." He "reacts harshly and sometimes lethally to insults."

-- Los Angeles Times, September 23, 2017.

2. "Compromise requires moderation, which is not a virtue in [a certain culture]; on the contrary, moderation is perceived as degrading."

-- Stephen J. Kim, from his letter published in The New York Times of April 27, 1987.
tunaafi
Posted: Thursday, September 28, 2017 5:48:11 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/3/2014
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Location: Karlín, Praha, Czech Republic
Chazlee wrote:
I think an attack upon NK at this point in time is more than justified.
[...]
So, I think the time for military strikes against NK has arrived. I can see no other options at this time.

How many millions of innocent Korean civilians will die if war starts?
How many tens of millions of others will die if the war escalates?
Can China stand by while the USA bombards North Korea?

Hey ho! Let's risk World War II and the destruction of the world to put rocketman in his place.

Yarin
Posted: Thursday, September 28, 2017 8:09:52 PM
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Joined: 7/30/2016
Posts: 481
Neurons: 2,432
The US dracula regime keeps declaring "We're at war with any independent country!" When will the US stop its crimes?
almo 1
Posted: Thursday, September 28, 2017 9:41:08 PM
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Joined: 10/16/2016
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Location: Fussa, Tokyo, Japan




the-japan-news.com/news/





It is of great significance that at the U.N. General Assembly, a forum that attracts global attention, U.S. President Donald Trump condemned North Korea’s outrageous acts, including its abduction of a Japanese citizen, and appealed for the solidarity of the international community.

Trump made his first speech at the general debate of the U.N. General Assembly since taking office.

Calling North Korea — a country that continues to develop nuclear weapons and missiles — a “rogue state,” Trump warned that “if it [the United States] is forced to defend itself or its allies, we will have no choice but to totally destroy North Korea.” He also emphasized that he would not tolerate nations that would supply arms and financially support North Korea.

It is reasonable for Trump to have made clear his intention of defending Japan and South Korea and his policy of intensifying pressure on Pyongyang until it ceases its hostile acts. Leaders of the countries concerned are required to reaffirm, at the U.N. assembly, the call for thoroughly implementing U.N. sanctions resolutions.

In his address, Trump said that North Korea “kidnapped a sweet 13-year-old Japanese girl from a beach in her own country to enslave her as a language tutor for North Korea’s spies.” He was apparently referring to Pyongyang’s abduction of Megumi Yokota in 1977.

As he pointed out by saying, “No one has shown more contempt for other nations and for the well-being of their own people than the regime in North Korea,” Pyongyang’s abduction of Japanese nationals symbolizes a crime of state and an infringement of human rights. The momentum for solving the problem must be raised once again.

It is worrisome that Trump has suggested his idea of revoking the Iran nuclear deal, calling it “one of the worst and most one-sided transactions” the United States has ever entered into.

Consider responsibility

In accordance with the deal in 2015, the United States and European countries lifted their sanctions on Iran in exchange for the country cutting back its nuclear program. This method of avoiding a crisis by exerting maximum pressure on the country, including a crude oil embargo and financial sanctions, will be helpful in dealing with North Korea.

Should the deal be revoked high-handedly, it may give Iran a pretext for resuming its nuclear development. Trump must recognize the gravity of the agreement, which Britain, France, Germany, China and Russia have also joined.

In his address, Trump asserted that “the leaders of your countries should always put your countries first,” probably because he was trying to justify his opposition to free trade and his immigration policy on the basis of his “America first” philosophy.

At the same time, he also referred to the necessity of member countries cooperating to create a “more safe and peaceful future for all people,” showing his consideration for the principle of international cooperation pursued by the United Nations and other entities.

Multilateral cooperation is indispensable in effectively tackling such issues as those related to North Korea, terrorism by Islamic extremist groups and the civil war in Syria. Trump may at last have come to understand the reality that the United States can neither handle these issues single-handedly nor take to isolationism, leaving them as they are.

The sovereignty, security and prosperity of all countries, which Trump said in his address he would place importance on, are underpinned by the U.S.-led international order. He should build foreign and security strategies taking his nation’s grave responsibility into account.





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