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'overcome', 'get over', and 'get rid of' can be interchangeable? Options
A cooperator
Posted: Wednesday, September 13, 2017 6:21:05 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 10/27/2011
Posts: 2,332
Neurons: 8,468
Location: Ḩāḑírah, Hadramawt, Yemen
Hi Everyone!
I can use 'overcome', 'get over', and 'get rid of' interchangeably?
How can I overcome this problem?
How can I get over this problem?
How can I get rid of this problem?

Whoever doesn't own what he promises to those who do not deserve must not promise it.
leonAzul
Posted: Thursday, September 14, 2017 1:58:19 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 8/11/2011
Posts: 8,122
Neurons: 25,782
Location: Miami, Florida, United States
A cooperator wrote:
Hi Everyone!
I can use 'overcome', 'get over', and 'get rid of' interchangeably?
How can I overcome this problem?
How can I get over this problem?
How can I get rid of this problem?


No, they are not exactly the same.

"To overcome" means to reverse the effects of a problem, by brute force if necessary.
"To get over" means to recover from the emotional effects of experiencing a problem.
"To get rid of" means to make the problem disappear, whether by fixing it or preventing it from happening, including removing the persons who are causing the problem.


"Make it go away, Mrs Whatsit," he whispered. "Make it go away. It's evil."
Romany
Posted: Thursday, September 14, 2017 12:59:58 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/14/2009
Posts: 13,155
Neurons: 40,093
Location: Brighton, England, United Kingdom
Leon,

"... including removing the persons who are causing the problem."

Tho' no-one's put their hand up to get rid of any turbulent priests for about the past half-millenia. Think ridding is going out of fashion.

Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Friday, September 15, 2017 6:35:57 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 27,115
Neurons: 149,215
Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
You're right.

The verb "to rid (someone) of (something bad)" has dropped very much out of use.
"Will no-one rid me of this troublesome priest?"

However, the idiom "get rid of (something bad)" is still common.
"Can you get rid of those old paint-brushes, please? Put them in the inflamables-bin."

Edited to change the last sentence - thank you thar

Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
thar
Posted: Friday, September 15, 2017 6:58:49 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/8/2010
Posts: 15,877
Neurons: 63,606
Shame on you

Brushes in with flammables?

Fire Safety Officer says "No!"



The priest, on the other hand... feel free. Not my problem!

Whistle
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