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Should 'Whenever' be in lower case? Options
Koh Elaine
Posted: Wednesday, September 13, 2017 4:36:42 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/4/2012
Posts: 2,294
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One glaring example is the decision not to call for a by-election when a seat is vacated in a Group Representation Constituency. This is wrong given that Section Article 49 (1) of the Constitution states that “Whenever the seat of a Member, not being a non-constituency Member, has become vacant for any reason other than a dissolution of Parliament, the vacancy shall be filled by election in the manner provided by or under any law relating to Parliamentary elections for the time being in force.”

Should 'Whenever' be in lower case?

Thanks.
leonAzul
Posted: Wednesday, September 13, 2017 5:20:25 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 8/11/2011
Posts: 8,070
Neurons: 25,558
Location: Miami, Florida, United States
Koh Elaine wrote:
One glaring example is the decision not to call for a by-election when a seat is vacated in a Group Representation Constituency. This is wrong given that Section Article 49 (1) of the Constitution states that “Whenever the seat of a Member, not being a non-constituency Member, has become vacant for any reason other than a dissolution of Parliament, the vacancy shall be filled by election in the manner provided by or under any law relating to Parliamentary elections for the time being in force.”

Should 'Whenever' be in lower case?

Thanks.


If the word begins a sentence in the original document, then the quoted form should be capitalized. However, as you can see, this looks odd if the quote is at the end of a sentence. Different publications handle this differently.

One solution is to begin the quote, "[w]henever…" the square brackets indicating an alteration to fit the sentence. I see this much more on web sites than I do in more traditional print.


Another is to shift the beginning of the quote to, "the seat of a Member" etc. In other words, just don't include the initial word "whenever" within the quotation.

"Make it go away, Mrs Whatsit," he whispered. "Make it go away. It's evil."
Koh Elaine
Posted: Wednesday, September 13, 2017 10:35:52 PM
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Joined: 7/4/2012
Posts: 2,294
Neurons: 9,524
Thanks, leon.
leonAzul
Posted: Thursday, September 14, 2017 1:42:18 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 8/11/2011
Posts: 8,070
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Location: Miami, Florida, United States
I just thought of a third, more traditional solution.

In most older styles it is considered necessary to introduce a direct quote with a preceding comma or colon and remove the word "that", as follows:

1) This is wrong given that Section Article 49 (1) of the Constitution states, “Whenever the seat of a Member, not being a non-constituency Member, has become vacant for any reason other than a dissolution of Parliament, the vacancy shall be filled by election in the manner provided by or under any law relating to Parliamentary elections for the time being in force.”

2) This is wrong given that Section Article 49 (1) of the Constitution states: “Whenever the seat of a Member, not being a non-constituency Member, has become vacant for any reason other than a dissolution of Parliament, the vacancy shall be filled by election in the manner provided by or under any law relating to Parliamentary elections for the time being in force.”

I personally find using a colon to separate the quotation to be the most natural and effective way in this case.

"Make it go away, Mrs Whatsit," he whispered. "Make it go away. It's evil."
Koh Elaine
Posted: Thursday, September 14, 2017 4:41:22 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/4/2012
Posts: 2,294
Neurons: 9,524
Thanks, leon.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Thursday, September 14, 2017 5:45:30 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
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Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
When I read the quoted sentences, my first thought was "The word 'that' should not be there."

A direct quotation would look like this:
One glaring example is the decision not to call for a by-election when a seat is vacated in a Group Representation Constituency. This is wrong given that Section Article 49 (1) of the Constitution states: “Whenever the seat of a Member, not being a non-constituency Member, has become vacant for any reason other than a dissolution of Parliament, the vacancy shall be filled by election in the manner provided by or under any law relating to Parliamentary elections for the time being in force.”

A reported quotation would look like this:
One glaring example is the decision not to call for a by-election when a seat is vacated in a Group Representation Constituency. This is wrong because the Constitution states that whenever the seat of a Member, not being a non-constituency Member, has become vacant for any reason other than a dissolution of Parliament, the vacancy should be filled by a standard, properly-run election.


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Koh Elaine
Posted: Thursday, September 14, 2017 6:43:17 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/4/2012
Posts: 2,294
Neurons: 9,524
Thanks, DragOnspeaker.
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