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azz
Posted: Wednesday, September 13, 2017 6:46:12 AM
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Can one say the following?
a. Sally, a brother of whose works in your store, told me that your business is good.
b. A woman a brother of whose works in your store told me that your business is good.

c. Sally, a necklace of whose was found in the burglar's apartment, didn't press charges against him.
d. A woman a necklace of whose was found in the burglar's apartment didn't press charges against him.

?


Many thanks.
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Wednesday, September 13, 2017 7:40:36 AM

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Nope.

Sally, whose brother works in your store, told me...

Sally, whose necklace was found in the burglar's apartment...


In the beginning there was nothing, which exploded.
NKM
Posted: Wednesday, September 13, 2017 9:51:33 AM

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No. We don't use "whose" that way.

We cay "a brother of yours" or "a sister of mine" or "a friend of ours", but not "of whose".

We could say "a brother of whom" to make it clear that we mean one of Sally's two or more brothers, but more likely it would just be "whose brother".

Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Wednesday, September 13, 2017 10:37:40 AM

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Now that the question is answered, I will add a comment.

In Britain and most countries which have an 'English-style culture', there is little importance placed on exact relationships.

Whether I have only one brother or several does not affect the fact that he's my brother.
It's not likely that someone would say "a brother of whose" because it is shorter and simpler to say "whose brother" - and the longer one does not say anything extra really.

We have had questions on this forum about how to ask "Which son are you in sequence of age, and of how many?" - there is no easy way. It is not a concept which makes any real difference in this culture.

"I am Dan's second son of three sons" is very unlikely to be said - one would just say "I am Dan's son."

Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Audiendus
Posted: Wednesday, September 13, 2017 11:10:52 AM
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Drag0nspeaker wrote:
We have had questions on this forum about how to ask "Which son are you in sequence of age, and of how many?" - there is no easy way. It is not a concept which makes any real difference in this culture.

"I am Dan's second son of three sons" is very unlikely to be said - one would just say "I am Dan's son."


If I were interested to know, I would ask: "What number son are you?", or, if I knew the total number of sons, "Which number son are you?"
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Wednesday, September 13, 2017 11:25:48 AM

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The questions (three times now, I remember) have asked for one word, amounting to "whichth" - "which number".

"I am the fourth son. Whichth son are you in your family?"


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
azz
Posted: Wednesday, September 13, 2017 5:42:24 PM
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Thank you all so much.

So if I say

Tom, car was stolen, was crying.
nobody would assume that he had one car. Right?

Many thanks.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Thursday, September 14, 2017 6:41:34 AM

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Hi azz!

Somehow you missed the "whose" - but you are right.

"Tom, whose car was stolen, was crying" means that Tom's car was stolen (it MAY have been his only car or it MAY have been his favourite of the six cars he owns) and he was crying.



Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Thursday, September 14, 2017 7:14:05 AM

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Location: Helsinki, Southern Finland Province, Finland
Drag0nspeaker wrote:
The questions (three times now, I remember) have asked for one word, amounting to "whichth" - "which number".

"I am the fourth son. Whichth son are you in your family?"


How manyeth time was this? Whistle


In the beginning there was nothing, which exploded.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Thursday, September 14, 2017 7:23:41 AM

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Jyrkkä Jätkä wrote:
How manyeth time was this? Whistle

At least third.

I guess that in some cultures, it is important how many brothers you have and which one you are. Anxious


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Audiendus
Posted: Thursday, September 14, 2017 8:49:51 AM
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Latin has the word quotus meaning "how manyeth".
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Thursday, September 14, 2017 9:52:28 AM

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Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom

Hmmmm - quotus POTUS?


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
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