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Archaic/regional use of "welcome" Options
Parpar1836
Posted: Tuesday, September 12, 2017 3:21:47 PM
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Modern editions of classic English novels often include notes and a glossary, which helps readers figure out unfamiliar words, terms, and archaic meanings. In George Eliot's Silas Marner (Chapter 14), Dolly Winthrop tells Silas, who has recently taken in his foundling daughter, Eppie, that she will gladly come to his cottage to help with the laundry and care of the baby. She tells him, ". . . but I'll come, and welcome, and see to it for you . . . So, as I say, I'll come and see to the child for you, and welcome." I'm unfamiliar with this sense of "welcome." It doesn't appear to mean that Dolly asks Silas to welcome her visits, but that she will come willingly. If you're familiar with 19th-century British English or dialect, might you know about this particular usage?

I suppose I could look it up in the Oxford English Dictionary, but it's more fun to post a query here.
NKM
Posted: Tuesday, September 12, 2017 4:22:50 PM

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That particular usage may be archaic; at least, I suppose it's not very common nowadays.

But we do use that same sense of the word "welcome" whenever we say "You're welcome" in response to "Thank you."

And we might say something like "You're welcome to borrow my car if you need to."

Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Wednesday, September 13, 2017 3:30:49 AM

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My first thought was the usage in "You're welcome!" which means "I'm pleased to do it!" or something like that.

She tells him, ". . . but I'll come, and welcome, and see to it for you . . ."
She tells him, ". . . but I'll be pleased to come and see to it for you . . ."

I didn't think of "You're welcome to borrow . . ." - which is the 'other flow' equivalent to "I'm happy to lend it to you".


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Харбин Хэйлунцзян 1
Posted: Wednesday, September 13, 2017 4:00:29 AM

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Drag0nspeaker wrote:
My first thought was the usage in "You're welcome!" which means "I'm pleased to do it!" or something like that.

In "You're welcome!" it works as an adjective while in the original quote it is definitely a verb:

http://www.thefreedictionary.com/welcome

Quote:
tr.v. wel·comed, wel·com·ing, wel·comes
1. To greet, receive, or entertain (another or others) cordially or hospitably.
2. To receive or accept gladly: would welcome a little privacy.

It is just used as intransitive without an object which makes it look strange.



აბა ყვავებს ვინ დაიჭერს, კარგო? გალიაში ბულბულები ზიან.
Audiendus
Posted: Wednesday, September 13, 2017 8:35:25 AM
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I wonder if "welcome", or the phrase "and welcome", is being used as an adverb here. Perhaps "and welcome" was a local idiom meaning "gladly".
Hope123
Posted: Wednesday, September 13, 2017 9:50:37 AM

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Audiendus wrote:
I wonder if "welcome", or the phrase "and welcome", is being used as an adverb here. Perhaps "and welcome" was a local idiom meaning "gladly".


My thoughts, too, Audi.

World food shortage that threatens five hundred million children could be alleviated at the cost of one day's warfare.
Parpar1836
Posted: Wednesday, September 13, 2017 11:30:20 AM
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Thanks!
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