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Fishing for young adult titles from outside the US Options
Andrew Schultz
Posted: Thursday, September 07, 2017 10:33:07 AM

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Joined: 7/7/2015
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Location: Chicago, Illinois, United States
I'm wondering about young adult books that are outside the US but not well known in the US.

I've discovered some good ones over the years:

* Molesworth by Geoffrey Willans
* Stig of the Dump by Clive King
* Uncle by JP Martin (I still have a few to read)
* The Secret Life of Adrian Mole, Aged 13 3/4

And non-British:
* Tove Jansson's Finn Family Moomintroll series

Does anyone have any others? (Also, for those who haven't read the above, I recommend them all.)

In the US, I can recommend the Freddy the Pig series, which may not be high literature, but there's a lot of it.

I particularly enjoy the idiom section of this fine website.
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Friday, September 08, 2017 4:43:11 AM

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Location: Helsinki, Southern Finland Province, Finland
Uncle Fyodor by Eduard Uspenski.

Glad that you have liked Moomin stories ;-)


In the beginning there was nothing, which exploded.
Romany
Posted: Friday, September 08, 2017 5:48:45 AM
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Joined: 6/14/2009
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Location: Brighton, England, United Kingdom

Andrew, -

When I was lecturing in China my Uni sent me over a box of YA literature: though my students were Uni students it was a great way of introducing them to a different way of life. (It turned out to be a great programme and a lot came from it). You weren't a member when my place burnt down so you probably don't know that, unfortunately, I lost everything I had - including all my books, so I can't give you titles and authors.

But type in some reference to Australian YA fiction and/or Prizewinners in YA fiction...you'll get hold of some pretty quirky stuff and they are also a good insight into Australian culture.
almo 1
Posted: Friday, September 08, 2017 8:08:17 AM
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Joined: 10/16/2016
Posts: 963
Neurons: 4,334
Location: Fussa, Tokyo, Japan


Romany,

so you were some kind of Professor or Doctor in Australian university and lecturing in China before your place was burned down?

and your son remained in China with his girlfriend?



Sarrriesfan
Posted: Saturday, September 09, 2017 2:00:19 AM

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Joined: 3/30/2016
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Location: Luton, England, United Kingdom
Two books I enjoyed reading at school were "Thunder and Lightnings" by Jan Mark and "The Ghost of Thomas Kempe" Penelope Lively both of which won the Carnegie prize for next British Children's book. Although that was back in the 1970s.

Susan Coopers "The a Dark is Rising" sequence is a good series of YA fantasy books set in the UK an mixture of life in 1960s and 1970s Britain and Arthurian legend. There was an attempt in the 2000s to make them a movie franchise but they failed as they made the lead an American visitor rather than a British boy, which lost the sense of the hero a Will being part of landscape events were happening which was important to the books.

I lack the imagination for a witty signature.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Monday, September 11, 2017 9:05:25 AM

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Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
One of my favourite sets (even now at over 65) is "The Dark is Rising" series. Wonderful.

If you like those, then "The Weirdstone of Bresingamen" and "The Moon of Gomrath" by Alan Garner.
In fact anything by him - "The Owl Service" is about Wales and is great, "Elidor" features a bunch of kids from Manchester.

"The Wizard of Earthsea" and its sequels - again anything by Ursula K. Le Guin.

"The Dragons of Pern" series by Anne McCaffrey.

"Beastmaster" - or any of the young adult books by Alice (André) Norton.

"The People" series by Zenna Henderson ("Pilgrimage", "No Different Flesh", plus a lot of novellas and short stories, collected together in "Ingathering")

**************
Sarriesfan wrote: There was an attempt in the 2000s to make them a movie franchise but they failed as they made the lead an American visitor rather than a British boy.
No! . . . I hadn't heard of that (I haven't had much contact with TV for thirty years of more).
How could they think that might work?

Sort of like making a film of "Huckleberry Finn" but changing the lead character to be a visiting German boy.

There were Old Ones from other countries, of course, (like the African who sent the mask) - but each was connected to an area/country. Will has to be British. The dreams of the Celts hiding their religious treasures when the Dark rose before would not make sense . . .

***************
Edited to add: Many of Neil Gaiman's books could be considered Young Adult, too.
He actually wrote "Ocean at the End of the Lane" for his wife, but it appeals to kids too.
Charlotte's Web, of course. The Graveyard Book is superb.

This little list from The Guardian looks good - I'd love to read The White Darkness.

I like the "Sabriel" books of Garth Nix, but others I know have not enjoyed them.


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Sarrriesfan
Posted: Monday, September 11, 2017 12:31:58 PM

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Location: Luton, England, United Kingdom
"Stardust" one of my favourites by Neil Gaiman, and " Neverwhere" is good too.

His collaboration with Terry Prachett "Good Omens" and even some of Terry Prahetts YA books such as "Dodger" and the "Wee Free Men" cribbens!



I lack the imagination for a witty signature.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Monday, September 11, 2017 1:24:57 PM

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Joined: 9/12/2011
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Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
Oh! How could I forget Tiffany Aching and the Nach MacFeegle - many books by Terry Pratchett.



As a complete change - I actually liked the TV series of Neverwhere - it was quite true to the book.


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Andrew Schultz
Posted: Monday, September 11, 2017 5:12:30 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/7/2015
Posts: 398
Neurons: 813,102
Location: Chicago, Illinois, United States
Thanks all for the responses, everyone! My mail showed 40 responses and I suspected spambots and gave up, until I got a new response here.

Jyrkkä Jätkä, yes, I imagine the original Moomintroll books have something extra pre-translation that we don't get in the English version. So I'm a bit jealous :)

Also, the Uncle Fyodor/Fedya series seems interesting. I noticed that there was a copy at the Northwestern library, where I half forgot there was another book I wanted to read. So I will be taking the train up shortly!

Sarrriesfan, I never thought about looking at the Carnegie Medal titles. I got through all the Newberry Medal titles from over the years here in the USA, so I think looking at the Carnegie Medal titles will also be quite enjoyable.

Romany, it's awful that those books got lost. Hope you are able to at least remember them some day and piece together details if you have the time/desire. I know I've been able to use Google to recall a few books. Australian YA is something I know little about so I'd like to look more.

Drag0nspeaker, thanks for the recommendations! I've read and liked a few of them, which is a great sign for reading and liking the others.

The Terry Pratchett mentions reminded me of the Bromeliad trilogy, which I liked a lot, and the Borribles too, which I don't remember details of.

Finally I remembered another series I really liked and it may be younger than Young Adult, but it's very funny and real: the Nicholas (Nicolas) series by Goscinny. Goscinny wrote the text for the Asterix comics (with Uderzo drawing the pictures) and the Nicolas stories are extremely funny and there just weren't enough of them. I picked up a book of unpublished stories and brushed up on my French just to get through them, and I really enjoyed that.

I know my list of books at http://people.ucalgary.ca/~dkbrown/favbooks.txt (been using for 20+ years) has run out of remaining possibilities...so it's great to get a refill. Thanks all!

I particularly enjoy the idiom section of this fine website.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Tuesday, September 12, 2017 8:16:45 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 27,115
Neurons: 149,215
Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom

Thanks for your list - the link you posted doesn't work (this text program doesn't like "special symbols" like ~, #, / etc). Your list is here.

Also, I suggest the complete works of Lewis Carroll and the Reverend Dodgson. Much of his work was short articles in newspapers and magazines - many of them making up mathematical puzzles which were published as "Knots". They're mostly not quite so crazy as "Alice", but are very clever.

Apparently, New Mexico have banned Neverwhere. There was one complaint from one mother about 'sexual innuendos' after the book was ten years in the school libraries - so it was banned. There is a much lower level of sexual innuendo in this book than there is in the Twilight series! I didn't notice any.



Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Andrew Schultz
Posted: Wednesday, September 13, 2017 12:16:05 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/7/2015
Posts: 398
Neurons: 813,102
Location: Chicago, Illinois, United States
Thanks for fixing the link, Drag0nspeaker! I keep forgetting how outdated the tilde is in URLs. It always used to be there before usernames. I'd never heard of the knots either.

And yes, that picture brings back memories of the first times reading Asterix.

My favorite is still Caius Fatuous fanning himself while talking to Caesar several times...then Caesar turns to him, fans himself, and says "You'd better hope so...for your sake...or else..." It's here for the image, or here for the whole thing(warning: huge loading time.)

It's funny how I grew to like Caesar as a worthy adversary for the Gauls. The actual history was much more complicated, of course.

As for Twilight, well... let's just say I had fun reading not one, but two, parodies. And apparently there are more since I last checked.

But I still like Bored of the Rings the best. I remember reading it in college and liking it despite not understanding the references. Then I googled and--someone had tracked them down! That's the Internet at its best :).

I particularly enjoy the idiom section of this fine website.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Wednesday, September 13, 2017 5:35:42 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 27,115
Neurons: 149,215
Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
Ha!
The best Roman name I remember is Dubius Purpus - but I had a good laugh about many of the 'pun' names.
I have many foreign friends and several of them have told me that the translations are just as good.
They did not just translate the names (which would not be funny in the new language) but created similar puns in each new language - Even Hungarian, which must be quite an art.

I read a few bits of 'Bored of the Rings' when I was at Uni, but not my taste. I liked the original books.

Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
almo 1
Posted: Tuesday, September 19, 2017 6:39:33 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 10/16/2016
Posts: 963
Neurons: 4,334
Location: Fussa, Tokyo, Japan


Bored of the Rings in theguardian:





After Tolkien, get Bored of the Rings




theguardian.com/books/booksblog/2011/







Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Tuesday, September 19, 2017 7:33:32 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/21/2009
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Location: Helsinki, Southern Finland Province, Finland
How could I forget to recommend Astrid Lingren?


Pippi Longstocking series (Pippi Långstrump)
Karlsson-on-the-Roof series (Karlsson på taket)
Emil of Lönneberga (Emil i Lönneberga)
Bill Bergson series (Mästerdetektiven Blomkvist)
Madicken
Ronia the Robber's Daughter (Ronja rövardotter)
Seacrow Island (Tjorven Vi på Saltkråkan)
The Six Bullerby Children / The Children of Noisy Village (Barnen i Bullerbyn)
Mio, My Son (also known as Mio, My Mio') (Mio, min Mio)
The Brothers Lionheart (Bröderna Lejonhjärta)

All suitable and readable for both children and adults.


In the beginning there was nothing, which exploded.
Andrew Schultz
Posted: Tuesday, September 19, 2017 12:37:21 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/7/2015
Posts: 398
Neurons: 813,102
Location: Chicago, Illinois, United States
Jyrkkä Jätkä wrote:
How could I forget to recommend Astrid Lingren?


Pippi Longstocking series (Pippi Långstrump)
Karlsson-on-the-Roof series (Karlsson på taket)
Emil of Lönneberga (Emil i Lönneberga)
Bill Bergson series (Mästerdetektiven Blomkvist)
Madicken
Ronia the Robber's Daughter (Ronja rövardotter)
Seacrow Island (Tjorven Vi på Saltkråkan)
The Six Bullerby Children / The Children of Noisy Village (Barnen i Bullerbyn)
Mio, My Son (also known as Mio, My Mio') (Mio, min Mio)
The Brothers Lionheart (Bröderna Lejonhjärta)

All suitable and readable for both children and adults.


Wow, I didn't know she's written other books than Pippi Longstocking. I mean, I probably should've suspected it, or I probably glossed over the "about the author" and forgot it, but... thanks for another reminder!

I may have a look to see what's been translated. Worldcat.org can be so useful in finding this sort of thing. Maybe I'll have reason/excuse to visit some new suburban libraries in the process!

I particularly enjoy the idiom section of this fine website.
almo 1
Posted: Tuesday, September 19, 2017 10:49:19 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 10/16/2016
Posts: 963
Neurons: 4,334
Location: Fussa, Tokyo, Japan



japantimes.co.jp/news/2013/israeli-moviemaker-tracks-down-japanese-woman-featured-in-50s-picture-book


After a three-year search, an Israeli filmmaker has located and met with a Japanese woman who, as a girl, featured in a picture book that has enchanted Israel for over half a century.

“Eva visits Noriko-san” tells the story of a Swedish girl, Eva, visiting her Japanese friend in Tokyo, Noriko, and introduces Japanese culture via their interaction. It was written by Swedish children’s book author Astrid Lindgren (1907-2002), known as the creator of “Pippi Longstocking.”

“Eva visits Noriko-san” has remained popular in Israel following the publishing of its Hebrew edition in 1957, and the 28th edition is currently being printed. Shargal said the woman known as Noriko-san may well be the most famous Japanese in Israel.



youtube.com/Japanese girl Noriko san in 1956 child book found






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