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Kim Jong-un's days are numbered. Options
Chazlee
Posted: Sunday, September 03, 2017 10:40:25 AM
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Kim Jong-un is playing a very dangerous game, and I believe he has overplayed his hand. It is not clear to me what he is trying to achieve by his incessant threats against countries clearly more powerful than North Korea will ever be. However, I believe that based on his never ending desire to successfully use nuclear weapons against his “enemies,” Kim is making it impossible for anyone he dislikes to ignore his threats. He clearly needs to be stopped, and I believe that this is going to happen very soon. Yet, I have been wondering which country will be the first to make a move against NK, and I think it is going to be South Korea.I base my opinion solely on SK's geographic location.

While both the US and Japan have legitimate reasons to be concerned about Kim, it is South Korea which is caught in the middle of all that is happening with NK. No matter if the missiles are going into or out of NK, it is South Korea which is most likely to lose the most. South Korea is sick of Kim, and they are scared of what he is trying/threatening to do. So, SK is probably soon going to make a move against NK with the rationale being “we have no other choice.” When this happens, the US, Japan, and other nations will line up to aid SK. The Chinese government will likely not do anything to protect Kim or NK as he has become a major liability to them.

I am not sure if anything I have offered here will come to pass, but it is clear to me that Kim’s time as leader of NK has a definite shelf life, and soon he will going to live with his father and granddad. It is just too bad that Kim is unlikely to ever become a prisoner in any labor camp in North Korea. Like Muammar Gaddafi before him, bullets will allow Kim to escape any rightful punishment he is due.
Peace.

Tovarish
Posted: Sunday, September 03, 2017 10:36:49 PM

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Chazlee, I sincerely hope your forecasts don't come to fruition, an attention seeking small man wanting the world to notice him but unfortunately its for all the wrong reasons.

Provoking Japan by firing missiles over their country obviously didn't get the reaction he wanted so his next step was two underground hydrogen explosions taking it to 10

nuclear detonations in total.

He is obviously escalating with his provocations showing his missiles can reach the US and Australia and all his close neighbours.

China is NK's only lifeline and supplier of oil with its own ambitions to become a World Power which is quite possible, but they should also remember with great power come

great responsibilities.

Personally I believe the Pacific Rim Countries are in a wait and see mode, and not just of North Korea.
almo 1
Posted: Monday, September 04, 2017 12:32:58 AM
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Location: Fussa, Tokyo, Japan




Tovarish wrote:

Provoking Japan by firing missiles over their country obviously didn't get the reaction he wanted


What reaction?





Tovarish wrote:

China is NK's only lifeline and supplier of oil


No, it is not.


Your comment is too superficial.







Related thread:


http://forum.thefreedictionary.com/postsm985414_





Tovarish
Posted: Monday, September 04, 2017 4:03:20 AM

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I feel Kim Jong-un is tempting the West to make the first strike, in retaliation to all these provocations.

There are restrictions of UN members trading with NK, both Russia and China also voted for this motion, and today the US wants a ban on any

country supplying NK, an interesting move.
Харбин Хэйлунцзян 1
Posted: Monday, September 04, 2017 4:36:12 AM

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Tovarish wrote:
both Russia and China also voted for this motion

That's about trade. In the case of humanitarian catastrophe both countries will supply whatever is needed to sustain them.

The US should have learned that their cavalier approach to world's problems does no good. Had the West not destroyed Libya as a state (however evil) this guy would have lived today:



აბა ყვავებს ვინ დაიჭერს, კარგო? გალიაში ბულბულები ზიან.
TheParser
Posted: Monday, September 04, 2017 7:22:29 AM
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History shows us one thing: We cannot predict "God" 's decisions.

1. No one ever thought that after President Richard M. Nixon won a massive reelection that he would resign a little later.

2. Right now, President Trump's enemies (they are not legitimate "opponents") are predicting that he will soon be gone.

3. My local "liberal" rag just reported that everyone has been surprised that Syria's President Assad is still there, despite predictions that he would have been "retired" by now.

4. Yes, "God" has plans for Marshal Kim, but we don't know what they are. And we common people do not know about any possible plans of foreign governments to "retire" the marshal.

Romany
Posted: Monday, September 04, 2017 8:56:42 AM
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Good heavens. Now it's not just the word 'liberal' that has to be shrouded in obfuscating punctuation, but 'God' too?

Wow, guys, we're in the same category as the Christian god! Now *theres* a turn-up for the books.
progpen
Posted: Monday, September 04, 2017 10:49:01 AM

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Romany, it's all about them being able to identify those "others". "god", "gays", "guns" are the big three here in the US.

Our lives begin to end the day we become silent about things that matter. ― Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.
Hope123
Posted: Monday, September 04, 2017 11:18:38 AM

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Xap, thanks for that POV. That bombing started in 1986, long before Hillary.


Equality is when you see a person - not a label.
Hope123
Posted: Monday, September 04, 2017 11:26:02 AM

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If there were such a thing as a God interested in the well being of the world, he'd not have let these two develop, let alone become powerful enough to control the destiny of humankind.

Equality is when you see a person - not a label.
almo 1
Posted: Monday, September 04, 2017 11:43:13 AM
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cnbc.com/2017/09/04/north-korea

News reports suggest many U.S. hedge fund managers have simply dismissed the pledge of peace and order on the Korean Peninsula issued by the Chinese Defense Ministry last Thursday.

Trading and investment experts continue to worry about the Korean military standoff, and they have also raised a caution flag on asset values in 40 percent of the world economy — countries that would be directly affected by a looming conflagration.

In an environment of confusion and bellicose rhetoric, it is perhaps normal that people known for their daring market bets should be erring on the side of prudence. What else is there to do when the White House says that the time for talk with North Korea is over, while the Pentagon urges diplomatic efforts, and a British military analyst, writing for a major Western newswire, doubts whether the U.S. would be able to intercept Pyongyang's missiles.

But this is more important: Beijing's categorical statement that it would not tolerate disorder and military hostilities in its neighborhood is at odds with its long-standing assurances that its influence with North Korea is limited.

Indeed, the logic of last week's statement implies quite the opposite: China, it now seems, claims an absolute control over North Korea and asserts its ability to control all other would-be belligerents — the U.S., Japan and South Korea.

If that's what the hedge funds see, their apparent indifference to Beijing's bravado is well taken.


The problem won't go away, though. The lingering threat of a major military clash will continue to unsettle the financial markets for the foreseeable future simply because there is no reasonable prospect of a diplomatic solution.

Briefly, Pyongyang considers its nuclear — and its claimed much more powerful thermonuclear — arms and their delivery vehicles its only life insurance. But the U.S. wants that insurance policy irrevocably and verifiably cancelled before coming to the negotiating table. That's the essence of the Korean issue.

The rest — such as trading the suspension of nuclear and ballistic missile tests against the suspension of U.S.-South Korean military exercises — are diversions from North Korea's nuclear disarmament.

What's the way out of this impasse? The U.S., Japan and South Korea believe that sanctions could force Pyongyang to get rid of its nuclear arms and ballistic missiles.

But that is another impasse because for China and Russia the sanctions regime imposed by the United Nations Security Council has been exhausted, and they vehemently oppose any further multilateral or unilateral steps to strangle the North Korean economy.

Since there is no military solution to the problem that would not cause a regional or global Armageddon, the logic would require some understanding among the U.S., China and Russia on the key features of a possible peace settlement.

That is another pipe dream.

The U.S. and China are engaged in a fight for Asia. Beijing sees the departure of American troops from South Korea as a solution to the Korean problem, and American patrols in the South China Sea as flagrant violations of China's territorial integrity. In Beijing's view, wide-ranging and intensifying American-Chinese trade disputes are only part of America's attempt to contain China.

TheParser
Posted: Monday, September 04, 2017 12:23:51 PM
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almo 1 wrote:



Beijing sees the departure of American troops from South Korea as a solution to the Korean problem.





Very interesting!



Some people think that world peace (and economic prosperity) is possible if the three most important countries in the world act as older brother to the nations in their part of the world.

The United States could be responsible for North and South America.

Russia could be responsible for Europe and the Middle East.

China could be responsible for Africa and Asia. (Marshal Kim would have no choice if his older brother put his foot down.)

Those three countries would be responsible for gently guiding their younger brothers in their particular sphere of influence. Only they would be allowed to have nuclear weapons.








almo 1
Posted: Monday, September 04, 2017 1:08:35 PM
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Yoshiko Sakurai (born 10 October 1945, Hanoi, French Indochina) is a Japanese journalist, TV presenter, and writer. She is also president of the Japan Institute for National Fundamentals, established in 2007.


Her conservative view on China:


CHINA’S BRUTAL HUMAN RIGHTS SUPPRESSION MAKES IT UNFIT TO BE WORLD LEADER


 Over the years there have been a good number of group photos of world leaders at various summits, but none that showed a US president not occupying the central position. In this vein, the latest one showing the heads of state attending the G20 summit in Hamburg, Germany July 7-8 was quite telling to me.

     It showed Germany’s Angela Merkel at the center of the group, with Xi Jinping standing to her immediate left and Vladimir Putin further to his left. Donald Trump was on the far left fringe, albeit in the front row, away from the center position that one would have thought he would take. That the supposed standard bearer of the free world stood on the fringe appeared to me to aptly project the state of affairs of the world today.

     What became freshly evident at the G20 summit 2017 was the aggressive posture of an arrogant and imperialistic China, and the conspicuous reluctance on the part of other nations to raise their voices against China.

     En route to Hamburg, Trump stopped over in Warsaw to deliver an address, lauding the Poles for their fight for freedom, independence, and human rights, and pledging America’s solid bond in support.

     Did Trump deliver the speech perceiving the G20 summit as an arena in which the opposing values of the free nations and the China-Russia bloc would fiercely clash? If so, to what extent were his words reflected in his deeds during the summit?

     Neither Trump nor the leaders of the European nations took up the matter of Liu Xiao-bo, the Nobel Prize-winning human rights activist jailed since 2008, reportedly in critical condition suffering last-stage liver cancer at this writing(July 12).

     On June 26, 2017, when China announced Liu’s condition, his cancer was already in its terminal stage. Although Liu expressed his desire to be treated overseas, even if his chance of survival was slim, the Chinese government refused to give him permission to leave China. American and German cancer specialists flew to China to examine him, and on July 8, it was announced that Liu’s condition was “rapidly deteriorating” and that chemotherapy had been discontinued.

     Western nations have been keenly interested in the state of human rights across the globe. The US, in particular, has a history of dealing sternly with China over its human rights abuses. That undoubtedly is a major reason why the US has won the respect and trust of the international community. Unfortunately, one fails to see in the Trump administration an earnest commitment to grapple squarely with the human rights issue.

     Germany, positioned to lead Europe, is also showing a stronger interest in economic cooperation with China than dealing with its human rights violations. Xi Jinping must have been greatly satisfied that the human rights issue barely surfaced during the summit sponsored by Germany.

China Tortures and Executes Intellectuals

     Liu is the democratic movement leader successive Chinese administrations have feared most. Akio Yaita, deputy head of the foreign news department of the conservative national daily Sankei Shimbun, has this to say about Liu:

     “Liu has been fighting for the freedom of the Chinese people all his life and is their great spiritual leader akin to a god. Bo Xilai, a disgraced former member of the politburo of the Chinese Communist Party, is another of Xi Jinping’s formidable political adversaries. Bo enjoys enduring popularity among the Chinese populace as a politician who has fought for their rights. Liu and Bo represent the spiritual forces guiding both the leftwing and rightwing camps in China towards the center. Quite coincidentally, both of them have contracted liver cancer. I suspect there are abnormal circumstances behind their ‘illnesses.’”

     Incidentally, Bo is a health buff who never drinks or smokes, his hobby being long-distance running—the exact opposite of Xi who indulges in drinking and smoking and whose trips to the gym never extend beyond the massage room. Yaita, who once served as the Sankei’s correspondent in Beijing and well versed in the ways of China, has serious doubts about Bo having naturally contracted liver cancer despite such a healthy lifestyle.

     As for Liu, I feel certain that the Chinese authorities chose to not dispense the medical treatment he needed badly despite being fully aware of his condition. This time, they have presumably decided to announce his condition, convinced he would never survive even if proper medical attention is given. It is also likely that the Chinese authorities felt they could lessen the public relations fallout by updating his condition now rather than making a perfunctory announcement of his death later. Yaita has this to say about some outstanding cases of human rights suppression in China:

     “On ‘Black Friday’ (July 10, 2015), more than 200 Chinese human rights lawyers were detained, including Li Heping. He was an extremely capable and courageous man who adamantly refused to admit to the charges the authorities made against him. He was tortured while in prison and given food and drugs contrived to boost blood pressure quickly, becoming almost blind as a result. When he was released last May after being in custody for about two years, his hair had turned completely white. He came out of prison as an old man, a totally different person.”

     One technique of torture traditionally used in China is to put a bag over one’s head to hinder breathing. Explains Yaita:

     “Leaving a detainee for a period of time with his face completely covered with a vinyl bag seriously reduces his intake of oxygen to the detriment of his brain cells. The bag is removed barely before the detainee drops dead. This process is repeated persistently until the detainee turns into a complete invalid.”

     Cambodia’s Pol Pot administration is known to have incorporated the same method, emulating Mao Zedong in torturing and executing Cambodian intellectuals. Obviously, the Xi administration still practices it today. At the G20 summit, however, Xi was not condemned or asked to rectify the situation. Where was Trump, the heroic defender of freedom in his speech in Poland?

Innocent Japanese Detained in China

     If the US and European nations refuse to take on China, then Japan must, upholding the universal values of freedom and human rights. Now is never too late. The Japanese government should declare immediately that it is ready to take over Liu’s treatment. Because of the geographical proximity between China and Japan, traveling to Japan for full-fledged treatment would be clearly much less trying physically to him than going to Europe, or the US.

     There is another reason for Japan to act quickly. A total of 12 Japanese are detained in China, accused of spying. Six of them, held since last March, work for NC Geophysical Survey Co., a Japanese firm based in Chiba Prefecture. Four are engineers.

     Goro Sasaki, president of the firm, described the detained employees as “serious and eager workers” who understand little Chinese. Sasaki questions what type of spying activities they could have possibly engaged in while conducting geological assessments for two Chinese hot spring developers in Penglai, eastern Shandong Province, and Wuzhishan on the island of Hainan. I think their detention may well be a new Chinese strategy to exert diplomatic pressure on Japan.

     In September 2010, China held four employees of the construction company Fujita on spy charges within days after Japan detained the captain of a Chinese trawling ship that had rammed two Japanese Coast Guard patrol boats. The incident took place in Japanese territorial waters off the Senkaku Islands in the East China Sea. This time, the Chinese obviously plan to use the six Japanese as pawns in future negotiations. In 2010, China further retaliated with a suspension of rare metal exports to Japan, violating the rules of the World Trade Organization. The bilateral relations between Tokyo and Beijing soured, and Japan finally was compelled to compromise by releasing the captain.

     At this juncture, what China undoubtedly wants is continued Japanese economic cooperation. The Chinese also wish to put a check on Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, who has vigorously alerted the world about China’s unrestrained development of islets in the South China Sea, talked positively about Taiwan’s Tsai Ing-wen administration, and shown a readiness to promote closer Tokyo-Taipei ties. Next year, Xi is slated to visit Japan, and prior to that, Abe will be visiting Beijing. Against this backdrop, the Xi administration is scheming to pursue policies towards Japan that will put it at its greatest advantage.

     It may perhaps be strategically necessary for Japan to assume a forward-looking posture towards the China-backed Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank (AIIB), as it is difficult to continue relying on the US economy as much as before. But we must realize that as a humanitarian nation, Japan now stands at a crossroads where it must plainly declare to the world community its renewed determination to honor universal values. For that purpose, I think it quite appropriate for the Japanese government to demand an immediate release of all of the 12 Japanese currently under detention in China and announce its readiness to receive Mr. Liu immediately for high-caliber medical treatment available in Japan.

(Translated from “Renaissance Japan” column no. 762 in the July 20、2017 issue of The Weekly Shincho)
Tovarish
Posted: Monday, September 04, 2017 10:23:45 PM

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Xap, I was posting about Trade to NK, so yes Russia and China voted to restrict trade, and that included the crude oil, cutting off the oil supply would shut NK down.

I would like to think we have learnt something from the Korean War, with China and USSR supporting the communist North and the West and the UN countries supporting the South.

Kim antoginising his neighbours and threatening the US and Australia must know if he strikes any of these countries there would be a massive loss of life and the end to his

dynasty.

Add nuclear weapons and that is the worst possible outcome.
almo 1
Posted: Monday, September 04, 2017 10:34:21 PM
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Tovarish wrote:
Xap, I was posting about Trade to NK, so yes Russia and China voted to restrict trade, and that included the crude oil, cutting off the oil supply would shut NK down.










"But that is another impasse because for China and Russia the sanctions regime imposed by the United Nations Security Council has been exhausted, and they vehemently oppose any further multilateral or unilateral steps to strangle the North Korean economy."


https://www.cnbc.com/2017/09/04/north-korea-hydrogen-bomb-test-the-world-is-on-the-verge-of-war-in-northeast-asia--commentary.html




Tovarish
Posted: Tuesday, September 05, 2017 1:21:19 AM

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Well from looking at Kim's waist line, the sanctions don't seem to be effecting him.

He seems to have convinced his people that he is a god, probably believing his own publicity.
tunaafi
Posted: Tuesday, September 05, 2017 3:17:20 AM

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TheParser wrote:
Some people think that world peace (and economic prosperity) is possible if the three most important countries in the world act as older brother to the nations in their part of the world.

[...]

Those three countries would be responsible for gently guiding their younger brothers in their particular sphere of influence. Only they would be allowed to have nuclear weapons.


Given the appalling records of these three countries in their treatment of weaker people in their own and in other countries throughout recorded history, these people must be out of their minds.
Romany
Posted: Tuesday, September 05, 2017 7:51:05 AM
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Romany
Posted: Tuesday, September 05, 2017 7:53:56 AM
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What makes me giggle is that Parsar has picked up the language of Communism with his continued prattle of 'little brother and 'big brother' etc. Dancing Well done, Comrade P!

Though he'll never know, due to his insistence on not reading anything that might contradict him - this continues to provide amusement: - as one imagines his absolute horror and indignation that the word "commie" could ever be attached to his self-described middle-of the road, courteous, place knowing, fair, kind personage.Dancing Dancing
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Wednesday, September 06, 2017 2:48:17 PM

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TheParser wrote:
Some people think that world peace (and economic prosperity) is possible if the three most important countries in the world act as older brother to the nations in their part of the world.

Wow!

The "three dictatorships" scenario from 1984, slightly revised.
Big brother is watching you.



Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Andrew Schultz
Posted: Wednesday, September 06, 2017 3:31:07 PM

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Drag0nspeaker wrote:
TheParser wrote:
Some people think that world peace (and economic prosperity) is possible if the three most important countries in the world act as older brother to the nations in their part of the world.

Wow!

The "three dictatorships" scenario from 1984, slightly revised.
Big brother is watching you.


Ouch, Drag0nSpeaker! The Parser talks about being at a library, but ... maybe read some of those banned books?

And in a sense, many of the most prosperous nations already do. That's what NATO and the UN are for. They are decidedly imperfect ways to go about things, but they are much better than the alternative.

Let's remember that the League of Nations collapsed and World War II started in 1939. With the UN, there has been no world war for 60+ years. There have been bad conflicts and innocent lives lost, but without it, events like the Rwandan genocide would have been even worse. Butchers like Milosevic were brought to justice before they could do even more damage. That doesn't excuse wrong choices. And I'm not sure if Parser has railed specifically against the UN. But Parser is arguing for a system of elites in its own way.


I particularly enjoy the idiom section of this fine website.
TheParser
Posted: Thursday, September 07, 2017 7:53:52 AM
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Drag0nspeaker wrote:

Big brother is watching you.




Some (many?) people wish that Big Brother were watching EVERYONE!

When police helicopters fly overhead, many people cheer (for those choppers are looking for a bad guy).

Some cities are planning to use drones. Yea! (Wouldn't it be great if those drones were armed and could "neutralize" bad guys (and gals) who are at that very moment robbing a store or in the midst of committing terror?)

If every human being were chipped, the guilty would always be caught and the innocent would always have an alibi. (Then you wouldn't have 500+ murders in Chicago so far this year!)

It is politically correct to rail at Big Brother.

In fact, Big Brother is our FRIEND.

(Don't forget: As a security guard, YOU are, in a sense, Big Brother. People look to you when they have problems or questions.)

*****

Things are getting so bad in California (because of "certain reasons") that at least three cities are now offering MONEY to bad guys (and gals) if they promise not to kill or rob or beat up people. I guess that the schools will soon be offering money to students if they promise not to beat up their teachers. We need Big Brother, i.e., more cameras everywhere outside and everywhere inside.



Have a nice day!







Andrew Schultz
Posted: Thursday, September 07, 2017 10:18:10 AM

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TheParser wrote:
Drag0nspeaker wrote:

Big brother is watching you.




Some (many?) people wish that Big Brother were watching EVERYONE!

When police helicopters fly overhead, many people cheer (for those choppers are looking for a bad guy).


When I was 5 I cheered helicopters a lot because I thought they were cool. I still do. But I don't cheer them.

Seriously, though, I'm glad you're not a black helicopter conspiracy theorist. That's just wack.

TheParser wrote:
If every human being were chipped, the guilty would always be caught and the innocent would always have an alibi. (Then you wouldn't have 500+ murders in Chicago so far this year!)


No potential for abuse of power, either!

And if police officers all wore bodycams, shootings like Philando Castile's would never happen! Or at least the officers would be found guilty.

Oh, wait. This isn't very funny for his family or friends.

TheParser wrote:
It is politically correct to rail at Big Brother.

In fact, Big Brother is our FRIEND.


You...you DO realize you're pretty much quoting the propaganda from 1984? And if there is a Big Brother, it will be politically incorrect NOT to praise him? Which is potentially a problem. I think you see why.

TheParser wrote:
...

We need Big Brother, i.e., more cameras everywhere outside and everywhere inside.

Have a nice day!


Oh, it's off to a start with a good laugh.

But seriously, while cameras in private areas (especially stores etc.) are valuable in apprehending thieves, it's a bit shocking to see how you have lurched towards pro-totalitarianism. I hope you weren't always there and this is just cognitive dissonance..

I particularly enjoy the idiom section of this fine website.
tunaafi
Posted: Thursday, September 07, 2017 11:37:28 AM

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TheParser wrote:
Things are getting so bad in California (because of "certain reasons")


Just what are these "certain reasons"?

Quote:
at least three cities are now offering MONEY to bad guys (and gals) if they promise not to kill or rob or beat up people.


For those interested, here is one news story on this: http://www.foxnews.com/politics/2016/08/24/one-california-city-is-paying-people-not-to-commit-crimes.html
almo 1
Posted: Thursday, September 07, 2017 12:23:25 PM
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Thanks to the link, I spotted an interesting news:


Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department helicopter circling around an unidentified flying object:


foxnews.com/tech/2017/09/06/ufo-spotted-over-californias-san-gabriel-valley


I witnessed exactly the same thing(an eyeball-like flying object) moving over Mt. Fuji when I was driving through Hakone years ago.



Tovarish
Posted: Friday, September 08, 2017 10:28:56 PM

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Today's news from NK is that they are attempting to refine their targeting, something that cannot be acquired on a simulator hence the constant launching of their missiles.

Lets hope they do succeed in their targeting as any drop shorts could be the spark we, the realistic countries we, are dreading.
almo 1
Posted: Friday, September 08, 2017 11:36:08 PM
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Good job!



Mexico expels North Korea’s ambassador


washingtonpost.com/world/


***********




Our thoughts are with everyone in Mexico and with those who have family members in Mexico affected by last night's earthquake.


http://www.bbc.com/news/world-




TheParser
Posted: Sunday, September 10, 2017 9:03:13 AM
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The widely respected Bloomberg Businessweek magazine carries an article (September 11, 2017) by one Michael J. Schuman entitled "How the Kims Came to Love The Bomb." Some of Mr. Schuman's opinions:

1. The "Kim family ... has lorded over the country since its founding by the current Kim's granddaddy in 1948. They are survivors."

2. "And that's what Kim is striving to do: survive."

3. "Pyongyang believes [nukes are] the best, and possibly only, deterrent against evaporation, absorption, or annihilation. ... The nukes aren't a bargaining chip. They're an insurance policy."

4. "Proactively launching a nuclear-topped ballistic missile against the U.S. would mean [Kim's] destruction. That's why it won't happen." (My emphasis)

5. "[T]he only viable option for Washington is to accept this reality and deal with Pyongyang as it does with any of the world's other nuclear powers."

6. Negotiating a settlement with Pyongyang as a nuclear power may actually bring a sort of stability to the peninsula that the U.S. has been seeking for more than 60 years."
Hope123
Posted: Sunday, September 10, 2017 9:34:14 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/23/2015
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Sounds sensible to me, Parser, to accept reality and deal with him the same as with other "nuke" countries - if he can be rational enough to accept those negotiations. Thanks for the article.

The escalation of words between those two men has to stop before someone loses their temper.

Einstein said something about we don't know what weapons will be used for WW III, but they will be sticks and stones for WW IV. (At least it was attributed to him.)

Equality is when you see a person - not a label.
Chazlee
Posted: Sunday, September 10, 2017 10:27:41 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/24/2016
Posts: 408
Neurons: 3,939
TheParser wrote:
The widely respected Bloomberg Businessweek magazine carries an article (September 11, 2017) by one Michael J. Schuman entitled "How the Kims Came to Love The Bomb." Some of Mr. Schuman's opinions:

1. The "Kim family ... has lorded over the country since its founding by the current Kim's granddaddy in 1948. They are survivors."

2. "And that's what Kim is striving to do: survive."

3. "Pyongyang believes [nukes are] the best, and possibly only, deterrent against evaporation, absorption, or annihilation. ... The nukes aren't a bargaining chip. They're an insurance policy."

4. "Proactively launching a nuclear-topped ballistic missile against the U.S. would mean [Kim's] destruction. That's why it won't happen." (My emphasis)

5. "[T]he only viable option for Washington is to accept this reality and deal with Pyongyang as it does with any of the world's other nuclear powers."

6. Negotiating a settlement with Pyongyang as a nuclear power may actually bring a sort of stability to the peninsula that the U.S. has been seeking for more than 60 years."


Parser, would you please put a link to the actual article you are citing? I have been searching, based on the title you gave, and I can't find it. Thank you.
Y111
Posted: Sunday, September 10, 2017 10:34:36 AM
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Joined: 6/25/2017
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Location: Kurgan, Kurgan, Russia
TheParser
Posted: Sunday, September 10, 2017 10:46:18 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/21/2012
Posts: 4,482
Neurons: 21,050



I do not know how to link.

I have to depend on the kindness of others.

Many thanks!
Chazlee
Posted: Sunday, September 10, 2017 10:48:31 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/24/2016
Posts: 408
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Chazlee
Posted: Sunday, September 10, 2017 10:52:05 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/24/2016
Posts: 408
Neurons: 3,939
TheParser wrote:



I do not know how to link.

I have to depend on the kindness of others.

Many thanks!


Parser, even if you do not know how to post a link to an article, (which is kind of hard to believe), that is not a good excuse to put an incorrect article title or the wrong date the article was published.
almo 1
Posted: Sunday, September 10, 2017 11:33:19 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 10/16/2016
Posts: 809
Neurons: 3,584
Location: Fussa, Tokyo, Japan
Hope123 wrote:
Sounds sensible to me, Parser, to accept reality and deal with him the same as with other "nuke" countries - if he can be rational enough to accept those negotiations.








This is reality



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