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This will make you sick (or sicker) Options
towan52
Posted: Thursday, August 31, 2017 10:02:10 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 8/28/2012
Posts: 1,676
Neurons: 159,573
Location: Midland, Texas, United States
Did you know that the U.S. spends about 90 percent more on health care than other industrialized countries? If you thought spending more was going to give us some sort of guarantee for better health outcomes, let’s remind ourselves that even after spending almost $10,000 per person annually on health care, we rank near the bottom in health care outcomes.
Did you know that 70 percent of all Americans take prescription medications, and we spend more on pharmaceuticals than the rest of the world combined?
These numbers are mind-boggling. We need to realize we did not get here overnight. The current status of our health care is a result of years of shrewd marketing techniques, relentless efforts of lobbyists for big pharmaceutical and food companies and government policies that have helped businesses more than promoting health.
To add to the problem, our current “fee for service” reimbursement model for physicians encourages them to do more and not less, promoting quantity of work over quality.
More than 75 percent of our nation’s health care costs are tied to the treatment of preventable conditions that are lifestyle-related, according to the Centers for Disease Control. Over the years, studies have shown that comprehensive lifestyle interventions can significantly improve outcomes in heart disease, diabetes, hypertension and many other chronic diseases.
But we do not see lifestyle interventions being used as a treatment.
There are two main reasons why these lifestyle intervention approaches have not gained momentum. First, intervention is more challenging and time-consuming than simply prescribing a pill. Patients need education, counseling and support to experience meaningful change. Second, the pharmaceutical approach is easier, insurance companies are set up to pay for medications and not lifestyle change, and physicians are taught to treat with medications instead of prescribing lifestyle interventions.

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"Today I was a hero. I rescued some beer that was trapped in a bottle"
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Friday, September 01, 2017 1:03:09 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 27,210
Neurons: 150,928
Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
When you look at the figures . . .

I know you know the UK system. The total cost of the National Insurance in 2014-2015 was £2075 per head - a bit higher in Scotland, Wales and Ireland and a bit less in England.
HM Treasury: Public Expenditure Statistical Analysis 2015.

That's about $2700 per year per person. Bit of a burden if you're never ill, but a lot less than paying privately if you see a doctor a few times a year.

Just so that it's not just "People in the UK don't know another system" - this is what an American has said after coming to work in England and experiencing the system (part of a whole report covering many details of life in Britain, it's not only about health isuues):

Quote:
A massive advantage of living here is the National Health Service. If an American could understand it, they would be amazed by its magnificence.
In this past week I have seen an ENT consultant surgeon and have had surgery scheduled in a few weeks' time. There was no direct cost to me.
Tonight my GP (family doctor) rang at 8pm to check in on another health issue. She is chasing a consultant to authorise a new medication and will ring me back next week. This did not cost me a penny.
So, three doctors and one medical procedure without a form to fill in or a bill to pay. Pretty damn impressive stuff — yes, I know it is in our taxes but the system works well. It is 'from birth to grave' care all woven together into one service — ambulance to GP to hospital to nursing care. There are all kinds of synergies created by such a system. It is to be deeply respected, emulated, and not feared.
Dawn Rutherford Marchant Full Blog here.

One could, of course, spend one's 'spare' $7000 per year on private medical care, if one wished - but there's hardly any need to. I've gone 67 years without paying for any medical needs - except when I caught 'flu while I was in Florida:
$80 for the doctor to say "Hello, you have 'flu. Here's a prescription, goodbye." - then $140 for a few antibiotics.

I don't think that the Affordable Health System was any good really. It seems to have helped a little, but a REAL, workably efficient system could halve every American's health insurance costs and provide coverage for the poor and unemployed.


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
jacobusmaximus
Posted: Friday, September 01, 2017 8:00:36 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 4/17/2009
Posts: 10,945
Neurons: 347,562
Location: Glasgow, Scotland, United Kingdom
Drag0nspeaker wrote:
When you look at the figures . . .

I know you know the UK system. The total cost of the National Insurance in 2014-2015 was £2075 per head - a bit higher in Scotland, Wales and Ireland and a bit less in England.
HM Treasury: Public Expenditure Statistical Analysis 2015.

That's about $2700 per year per person. Bit of a burden if you're never ill, but a lot less than paying privately if you see a doctor a few times a year.

Just so that it's not just "People in the UK don't know another system" - this is what an American has said after coming to work in England and experiencing the system (part of a whole report covering many details of life in Britain, it's not only about health isuues):

Quote:
A massive advantage of living here is the National Health Service. If an American could understand it, they would be amazed by its magnificence.
In this past week I have seen an ENT consultant surgeon and have had surgery scheduled in a few weeks' time. There was no direct cost to me.
Tonight my GP (family doctor) rang at 8pm to check in on another health issue. She is chasing a consultant to authorise a new medication and will ring me back next week. This did not cost me a penny.
So, three doctors and one medical procedure without a form to fill in or a bill to pay. Pretty damn impressive stuff — yes, I know it is in our taxes but the system works well. It is 'from birth to grave' care all woven together into one service — ambulance to GP to hospital to nursing care. There are all kinds of synergies created by such a system. It is to be deeply respected, emulated, and not feared.
Dawn Rutherford Marchant Full Blog here.

One could, of course, spend one's 'spare' $7000 per year on private medical care, if one wished - but there's hardly any need to. I've gone 67 years without paying for any medical needs - except when I caught 'flu while I was in Florida:
$80 for the doctor to say "Hello, you have 'flu. Here's a prescription, goodbye." - then $140 for a few antibiotics.

I don't think that the Affordable Health System was any good really. It seems to have helped a little, but a REAL, workably efficient system could halve every American's health insurance costs and provide coverage for the poor and unemployed.


_------------_--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Yet it is not true that healthcare in the UK does not 'cost a penny'. We pay for it through our income tax and National Insurance contributions. That said, our healthcare is still the best in the world, but that may be about to change.

I remember, therefore I am.
towan52
Posted: Saturday, September 02, 2017 9:53:38 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 8/28/2012
Posts: 1,676
Neurons: 159,573
Location: Midland, Texas, United States
Great input! Most Americans don't know a great deal about national health plans and the information they receive about those schemes often comes from insurance and pharmaceutical organisations - you can imagine the "spin" on those! I've had a difficult couple of years in respect of health and, according to my Blue Cross Blue Shield (BCBS) annual statement my treatment has come to a total cost of over $340k. I get my health insurance through my work (an invidious practice) but still spend over $10k per year in co-pays, meeting deductibles and prescriptions. The amount that BCBS says it forked out on my behalf is, at best, disingenuous because, with discounts and rebates, they probably paid out about 25% of what they say. Be grateful and protect the NHS at all costs!

"Today I was a hero. I rescued some beer that was trapped in a bottle"
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