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Self-righteousness is not religion. To attack the first is not to assail the last. Options
Daemon
Posted: Wednesday, August 23, 2017 12:00:00 AM
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Self-righteousness is not religion. To attack the first is not to assail the last.

Charlotte Bronte (1816-1855)
KSPavan
Posted: Wednesday, August 23, 2017 1:06:23 AM

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Quotation of the Day

Self-righteousness is not religion. To attack the first is not to assail the last.

Charlotte Bronte (1816-1855)
monamagda
Posted: Wednesday, August 23, 2017 7:55:11 AM

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Context from: Jane Eyre

Introduction

PREFACE

A preface to the first edition of "Jane Eyre" being unnecessary, I gave none: this second edition demands a few words both of acknowledgment and miscellaneous remark.
My thanks are due in three quarters.
To the Public, for the indulgent ear it has inclined to a plain tale with few pretensions.
To the Press, for the fair field its honest suffrage has opened to an obscure aspirant.
To my Publishers, for the aid their tact, their energy, their practical sense and frank liberality have afforded an unknown and unrecommended Author.
The Press and the Public are but vague personifications for me, and I must thank them in vague terms; but my Publishers are definite: so are certain generous critics who have encouraged me as only large-hearted and high-minded men know how to encourage a struggling stranger; to them, i.e., to my Publishers and the select Reviewers, I say cordially, Gentlemen, I thank you from my heart.
Having thus acknowledged what I owe those who have aided and approved me, I turn to another class; a small one, so far as I know, but not, therefore, to be overlooked. I mean the timorous or carping few who doubt the tendency of such books as "Jane Eyre:" in whose eyes whatever is unusual is wrong; whose ears detect in each protest against bigotry--that parent of crime--an insult to piety, that regent of God on earth. I would suggest to such doubters certain obvious distinctions; I would remind them of certain simple truths.
Conventionality is not morality. Self-righteousness is not religion. To attack the first is not to assail the last. To pluck the mask from the face of the Pharisee, is not to lift an impious hand to the Crown of Thorns.
These things and deeds are diametrically opposed: they are as distinct as is vice from virtue. Men too often confound them: they should not be confounded: appearance should not be mistaken for truth; narrow human doctrines, that only tend to elate and magnify a few, should not be substituted for the world-redeeming creed of Christ. There is--I repeat it--a difference; and it is a good, and not a bad action to mark broadly and clearly the line of separation between them.


Read more:http://www.literaturepage.com/read/janeeyre-1.html

raghd muhi al-deen
Posted: Wednesday, August 23, 2017 9:11:59 AM

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Brontë
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.
Related to Brontë: Currer Bell, Anne Brontë, Brontë sisters
Brontë (brŏn`tē), family of English novelists, including Charlotte Brontë, 1816–55, English novelist, Emily Jane Brontë, 1818–48, English novelist and poet, and Anne Brontë, 1820–49, English novelist.
Lives and Works

The Brontë sisters were daughters of Patrick Brontë (1777–1861), an Anglican clergyman of Irish birth, educated at Cambridge. In 1820 Patrick Brontë became incumbent of Haworth, West Riding of Yorkshire. The next year his wife died, and her sister, Elizabeth Branwell, came to the parsonage to care for the six Brontë children, five girls and one boy, Branwell. Maria and Elizabeth, the two oldest girls, were sent to the Cowan Bridge school for the daughters of poor clergymen. In spite of the harsh conditions there, Charlotte and Emily were also sent in 1824, but were brought home after Maria and Elizabeth contracted tuberculosis and died.

At home for the next five years, the children were left much to themselves, and they began to write about an imaginary world they had created. This escapist writing, transcribed in tiny script on small pieces of paper, continued into adulthood and is a remarkable key to the development of genius in Charlotte and Emily. In 1831, Charlotte was sent to Miss Wooler's school at Roe Head. She became a teacher there in 1835, but in 1838 she returned to Haworth. At home she found the family finances in wretched condition. Branwell—talented as a writer and painter, on whom his sisters' hopes for money and success rested—had lost three jobs and was declining into alcoholism and opium addiction.

To increase their income Charlotte and her sisters laid ill-considered plans to establish a school. In order to study languages Emily and Charlotte spent 1842 at the Pensionnat Héger in Brussels, but returned home at the death of their aunt, who had willed them her small fortune. Both girls were offered positions at the pensionnat, but only Charlotte returned in 1843. She went home the following year, because, it is thought, she was in love with M. Héger and had aroused the jealousy of Mme Héger. Mr. Brontë's failing eyesight and the rapid degeneration of Branwell made this an unhappy period at home.

When Charlotte discovered Emily's poetry in 1845, Anne revealed hers, and the next year the collected poems of the three sisters, published at their own expense, appeared under the pseudonyms Currer, Ellis, and Acton Bell. In 1847 Emily's novel Wuthering Heights and Anne's Agnes Grey were published as a set. Although the novel The Professor by Charlotte was rejected, her Jane Eyre (1847) was accepted and published with great success. The identity of the sisters as authors was at first unknown even to their publishers. It was not until after the publication of Charlotte's Shirley in 1849 that the truth was made public.

with my pleasure
mudbudda669
Posted: Wednesday, August 23, 2017 9:39:46 AM

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Sure
Mehrdad77
Posted: Wednesday, August 23, 2017 10:04:50 AM

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Self-righteousness has killed more people than smoking.






John McCarthy
Mehrdad77
Posted: Wednesday, August 23, 2017 10:08:00 AM

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Location: Tehrān, Tehran, Iran
The Bible makes it clear that self-righteousness is the premier enemy of the Gospel.




Tullian Tchividjian
Bully_rus
Posted: Wednesday, August 23, 2017 2:06:51 PM
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Daemon wrote:
Self-righteousness is not religion. To attack the first is not to assail the last.

Charlotte Bronte (1816-1855)


Is there any righteousness in self-righteousness?
Verbatim
Posted: Wednesday, August 23, 2017 4:27:55 PM
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Joined: 10/3/2012
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Daemon wrote:
Self-righteousness is not religion. To attack the first is not to assail the last.

Charlotte Bronte (1816-1855)


Actually, some religion has grown out of some self-righteousness and still preaches
some of the most hypocritical righteousness, just like it did during the ancient times.
To assail that righteousness in any sphere of social and political life is the right
thing to do.

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