The Free Dictionary  
mailing list For webmasters
Welcome Guest Forum Search | Active Topics | Members

There are certain queer times and occasions in this strange mixed affair we call life when a man takes this whole universe... Options
Daemon
Posted: Tuesday, August 22, 2017 12:00:00 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/7/2009
Posts: 21,477
Neurons: 64,434
Location: Inside Farlex computers
There are certain queer times and occasions in this strange mixed affair we call life when a man takes this whole universe for a vast practical joke.

Herman Melville (1819-1891)
Jim Cape
Posted: Tuesday, August 22, 2017 12:50:19 AM

Rank: Newbie

Joined: 3/13/2017
Posts: 36
Neurons: 63,581
Location: St. Louis, Missouri, United States
I do that on a daily bases. Sometimes more on any given day.
KSPavan
Posted: Tuesday, August 22, 2017 3:18:27 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 1/28/2015
Posts: 1,644
Neurons: 1,878,521
Location: Kolkata, Bengal, India
Quotation of the Day

There are certain queer times and occasions in this strange mixed affair we call life when a man takes this whole universe for a vast practical joke.

Herman Melville (1819-1891)
ChristopherJohnson
Posted: Tuesday, August 22, 2017 6:34:39 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/27/2014
Posts: 1,624
Neurons: 835,936
Location: Tbilisi, T'bilisi, Georgia
Yes, this life of ours seems to be one entire practical joke.
raghd muhi al-deen
Posted: Tuesday, August 22, 2017 9:50:36 AM

Rank: Member

Joined: 4/19/2017
Posts: 313
Neurons: 37,654
Location: Baghdad, Mayorality of Baghdad, Iraq

Herman Melville
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.
Melville, Herman, 1819–91, American author, b. New York City, considered one of the great American writers and a major figure in world literature.
Early Life and Works

Born into an impoverished family of distinguished Dutch and English colonial descent, Melville was 12 when his father died. He left school at 15, worked at a variety of jobs, and in 1839 signed on as a cabin boy on a ship bound for Liverpool, an experience reflected in his romance Redburn. In 1841–42 he spent 18 months on a whaler, but intolerable hardships on board caused him and a companion to escape from the ship at the Marquesas Islands. The two were captured by a tribe of cannibals, by whom they were well treated. After being rescued by an Australian whaler, Melville spent some time in Tahiti and other Pacific islands before shipping home in 1844.

The immediate results of his experiences were Typee: A Peep at Polynesian Life (1846), Omoo: A Narrative of Adventures in the South Seas (1847), as well as Redburn (1849), all fresh, exuberant, and immensely popular romances. In 1847, Melville married Elizabeth Shaw, the daughter of Lemuel Shaw, chief justice of Massachusetts. The popularity of his books brought him prosperity, business trips to Europe, and admission to literary circles in New York City. In 1850 he bought a farm near Pittsfield, Mass., and became friends with his neighbor Nathaniel Hawthorne

. The allegorical implications evident in his romances Mardi: and a Voyage Thither (1849) and White-Jacket; or, The World in a Man-of-War (1850) reached full development in Melville's masterpiece, Moby-Dick; or, The Whale (1851).
Moby-Dick

The story of a deranged whaling captain's obsessive voyage to find and destroy the great white whale that had ripped off his leg, the novel is at once an exciting sea story, a sociological critique of various American class and racial prejudices, a repository of information about whales and whaling, and a philosophical inquiry into the nature of good and evil, of man and his fate. The novel is heavily symbolic, and many critical formulations have been made as to the meaning of its central symbol, the great white whale Moby-Dick himself. Moby-Dick is greatly enhanced by Melville's rhythmic, rhetorical prose style. Although it is now considered one of the greatest of all novels, Moby-Dick was misunderstood and ill-received in its time. Readers were confused by the book's symbolism, and they failed to grasp Melville's complex view of the world.

with my pleasure
MelissaMe
Posted: Tuesday, August 22, 2017 11:49:53 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 8/10/2014
Posts: 5,366
Neurons: 342,748
Location: Gualala, California, United States
Sometimes the entire universe really IS merely one, large, practical joke!

This is my only now.
mudbudda669
Posted: Tuesday, August 22, 2017 12:18:37 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 1/15/2015
Posts: 297
Neurons: 216,803
Location: Tallahassee, Florida, United States
always these days
Joseph San George
Posted: Tuesday, August 22, 2017 12:55:38 PM

Rank: Newbie

Joined: 7/11/2017
Posts: 3
Neurons: 4,332
Location: Mesa, Arizona, United States
A similar line from Franz Kafka comes to mind. It's been a long time but, paraphrased, goes something like this, " the entire world is nothing but one big practial joke played at one's own expense." He lived shortly after Melville however, the truth of remark vibrates to this day.
monamagda
Posted: Tuesday, August 22, 2017 1:46:42 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 2/4/2014
Posts: 5,513
Neurons: 3,526,504
Location: Bogotá, Bogota D.C., Colombia


Context from: Moby Dick

CHAPTER 49:

The Hyena.


There are certain queer times and occasions in this strange mixed affair we call life when a man takes this whole universe for a vast practical joke, though the wit thereof he but dimly discerns, and more than suspects that the joke is at nobody's expense but his own. However, nothing dispirits, and nothing seems worth while disputing. He bolts down all events, all creeds, and beliefs, and persuasions, all hard things visible and invisible, never mind how knobby; as an ostrich of potent digestion gobbles down bullets and gun flints. And as for small difficulties and worryings, prospects of sudden disaster, peril of life and limb; all these, and death itself, seem to him only sly, good-natured hits, and jolly punches in the side bestowed by the unseen and unaccountable old joker. That odd sort of wayward mood I am speaking of, comes over a man only in some time of extreme tribulation; it comes in the very midst of his earnestness, so that what just before might have seemed to him a thing most momentous, now seems but a part of the general joke. There is nothing like the perils of whaling to breed this free and easy sort of genial, desperado philosophy; and with it I now regarded this whole voyage of the Pequod, and the great White Whale its object.


Bully_rus
Posted: Tuesday, August 22, 2017 2:04:14 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/26/2013
Posts: 2,178
Neurons: 122,595
Location: Minsk, Minskaya Voblasts', Belarus
Daemon wrote:
There are certain queer times and occasions in this strange mixed affair we call life when a man takes this whole universe for a vast practical joke.

Herman Melville (1819-1891)


All joking aside, sooner or later everyone will be the butt of this joke...
Users browsing this topic
Guest


Forum Jump
You cannot post new topics in this forum.
You cannot reply to topics in this forum.
You cannot delete your posts in this forum.
You cannot edit your posts in this forum.
You cannot create polls in this forum.
You cannot vote in polls in this forum.

Main Forum RSS : RSS
Forum Terms and Guidelines. Copyright © 2008-2017 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.