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When did Venusian become an acceptable synonym for Venerian? Options
Martin Katz
Posted: Monday, August 21, 2017 6:40:54 PM
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The word "Venerian" has always been the correct modern US English word for references to the planet Venus. Modern in this case refers to Daniel Webster and later.

Today, I saw NASA use "Venusian" instead of "Venerian." Although many people confuse Venereal (referring to the goddess Venus) and Venusian (referring to the planet Venus), Venusian has always been considered an error.

When did it become OK to use Venusian to refer to something related to the planet?
leonAzul
Posted: Monday, August 21, 2017 7:27:18 PM

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Martin Katz wrote:
The word "Venerian" has always been the correct modern US English word for references to the planet Venus. Modern in this case refers to Daniel Webster and later.

Today, I saw NASA use "Venusian" instead of "Venerian." Although many people confuse Venereal (referring to the goddess Venus) and Venusian (referring to the planet Venus), Venusian has always been considered an error.

When did it become OK to use Venusian to refer to something related to the planet?


You or your sources have that reversed.

The preferred literal reference to Venus (the goddess, the planet, or the hypothetical planet's natives) has been "Venusian" for at least the last two hundred years (please refer to https://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?content=Venusian%2CVenerian…) by a significant margin.

In 1870 the difference of incidence in published material was over three orders of magnitude according to Google Books' corpus.


"Make it go away, Mrs Whatsit," he whispered. "Make it go away. It's evil."
palapaguy
Posted: Monday, August 21, 2017 8:45:44 PM

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I agree with Leon. I've never seen Venerian used before, but I've seen Venusian countless times over the years.
IMcRout
Posted: Tuesday, August 22, 2017 2:10:23 AM

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Maybe one of those infamous Venusian venereans?

I totally take back all those times I didn't want to nap when I was younger. (Anon)
Romany
Posted: Tuesday, August 22, 2017 4:28:07 AM
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Have to admit to never having come across the word Venerean before - though I've not had much to do with Astronomy in the last couple of decades.

In BE Venusian has always been the word used - and I think that after H.G. Wells influence that's pretty much cast in stone. However, Thar should be able to say if "Venerean" is familiar to him.

(From a language pov Venusian is unequivocally Venus-related to anyone not knowing the word, while Venerean: - well the average person would make the connection to sexuality rather than astronomy, surely?)
thar
Posted: Wednesday, August 23, 2017 7:16:23 AM

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Yes, I suspect the earlier identification with pubic anatomy,sex and venereal disease rather influenced the decision to use the term ' Venusian'.


The Soviet missions to Venus were the Venera programme.

After managing a flyby of the moon, the Soviets tried Venus with Venera 1, but it failed. This was before they put any manned missions into orbit.
They kept trying with 2 and 3 (both lost), but as the space race started they concentrated on the Moon. When they realised they wouldn't beat the US to the Moon they went back to Venus with Venera 4 and 5 and 6, and had the first lander with 7.
But more interesting things were going on with the Moon and Mars, and Venus missions always lost contact, so they went to the easier places. Eventually Venera 9 landed and sent back images. Kept going all the way to 16, while the US concentrated on the Moon, Mars, and outer planet Voyager probes, and only sent a couple of probes to Venus.

To NASA, I suspect Venera meant the Soviet programme, not the Latin declension of venus, veneris.




[The commentary is mine. In case people don't know my style, my historical narrative is personal rather than objective. I try to get facts right, but I reserve the right to link them according to my own opinions, so I freely admit any, um, divergence from other people's versions. Whistle ]
palapaguy
Posted: Thursday, August 24, 2017 9:07:23 PM

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Martin Katz wrote:
The word "Venerian" has always been the correct modern US English word for references to the planet Venus. Modern in this case refers to Daniel Webster and later.

Today, I saw NASA use "Venusian" instead of "Venerian." Although many people confuse Venereal (referring to the goddess Venus) and Venusian (referring to the planet Venus), Venusian has always been considered an error.

When did it become OK to use Venusian to refer to something related to the planet?

Please cite authority for your claim "Venusian has always been considered an error."
EPT31
Posted: Friday, August 25, 2017 5:18:37 AM
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IMHO, it depends more on the type of publication.

- Classical, science or international publications tend to stick with Latin grammar, because it eases identification and translation of technical terms, and because it sounds smarter.
(Alma mater's unofficial motto : quidquid latine dictum sit altum sonatur.)
So, the "classical" words for "related to Venus" derive from the genitive form of Venus : Veneris. And universitarian smart guys (another -aris genitive Whistle ) will use it to display they belong to the smart guys club.

- The man on the street on the other hand didn't care about Venus as a goddess or a planet for a millennium at least, except for a specific, intimate matters where Latin words are considered less crude than English equivalents. (Hence the continuation of the medical usage of "venereal" in everyday modern English.)

So when astrology, then science-fiction, then astronomy became "mainstream", Latin's etymology was long lost to most people and "Venusian" was constructed from a more English pattern.

So my guess to Martin's puzzle would be "When the public at large was aware enough of the planet's existence as a world to speculate about its inhabitants."


btw, "Venera" simply means "Venus" in most of East-European languages.


[The commentary is mine. I don't post enough for people knowing my style, let's simply say that my main personal goal is to practice a foreign language when I write here. I try to get facts right, but I reserve the right to link them according to my own opinions, so I freely admit any, um, divergence from other people's versions. Whistle With apologies to thar for the blatant plagiarism, and all my gratitude as I wanted to express this for long without knowing how Pray]

Marcia Purse
Posted: Wednesday, November 01, 2017 5:22:49 PM

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I guess none of you has read anything by Robert Heinlein. He uses the term "Venerian" exclusively, which is etymologically correct, as the genitive (possessive) form of "Venus" is "Veneris." As a corollary, I've never seen the moons of Jupiter referred to as anything but "Jovian," again from the Latin "Iuppiter, Iovis." I just looked up declensions of a few other planets' names and was surprised to find that "Uranus" is from the Greek name "Ouranos." You'd think after 55 years of reading literate science fiction I'd have picked that up.

"Venusian" makes me sad and sorry and somewhat disgusted.
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Thursday, November 02, 2017 4:47:28 AM

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From what planet are the Antediluvians? Angel


In the beginning there was nothing, which exploded.
mactoria
Posted: Thursday, November 02, 2017 6:17:07 AM
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Checked Google's Ngram system, and 'venerian' only started appearing in English language usage in the 1930s, while 'venusian' appeared back in the 1830s. The usage of 'venerian' has been at a very low level for several decades, while 'venusian' has been at a high level for several decades. Usage doesn't necessarily make it correct, but explains why a lot of us have never heard of 'venerian' in the context of Venus.
Kirill Vorobyov
Posted: Thursday, November 02, 2017 6:59:31 AM

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And what is the Genetive for curriculum vitae in plural?

These ... (CVs') layout would have to be modified in line with the model.

d'oh!
Lotje1000
Posted: Thursday, November 02, 2017 7:30:48 AM

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Kirill Vorobyov wrote:
And what is the Genetive for curriculum vitae in plural?

These ... (CVs') layout would have to be modified in line with the model.

d'oh!


I would say the plural is curricula vitae. According to wiki, you could also write curricula vitarum.
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