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Which sentence is correctly punctuated? Options
Koh Elaine
Posted: Friday, August 11, 2017 12:53:45 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/4/2012
Posts: 2,807
Neurons: 11,356
One can rely on the passage that promises, “‘Concerning this man's attainment of Buddhahood, there can assuredly be no doubt’, and there is no question about the Buddha's pronouncement that ‘I alone can save them’.”

One can rely on the passage that promises ‘Concerning this man's attainment of Buddhahood, there can assuredly be no doubt’, and there is no question about the Buddha's pronouncement that ‘I alone can save them.’

Which sentence is correctly punctuated?

Thanks.
NKM
Posted: Friday, August 11, 2017 7:33:33 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 2/14/2015
Posts: 4,192
Neurons: 192,531
Location: Corinth, New York, United States
Koh Elaine wrote:
One can rely on the passage that promises, “‘Concerning this man's attainment of Buddhahood, there can assuredly be no doubt’, and there is no question about the Buddha's pronouncement that ‘I alone can save them’.”

One can rely on the passage that promises ‘Concerning this man's attainment of Buddhahood, there can assuredly be no doubt’, and there is no question about the Buddha's pronouncement that ‘I alone can save them.’

Which sentence is correctly punctuated?

Thanks.

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That depends on what the sentence is supposed to mean.

The first one, with the American-style quotation marks, says that "the passage" includes both quotations, as well as the intervening "there is no question" clause.

The second, with its British "inverted commas", limits the scope of "the passage" to the first quote, entirely separate from the entire second clause.

Aside from that, I suppose you may have meant to ask whether or not there should be a comma after "promises". I'm not sure there's a correct answer for that; it seems (at least to me) to be a matter of personal taste. (For myself, I'd be tempted to use a colon there, at least in the first form.)

Koh Elaine
Posted: Friday, August 11, 2017 11:09:46 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/4/2012
Posts: 2,807
Neurons: 11,356
Thanks, NKM.
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