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Whose foot was being stomp? Options
bihunsedap
Posted: Tuesday, August 08, 2017 9:58:06 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 11/26/2014
Posts: 1,195
Neurons: 5,973


Everyone's waiting in a line.
Carrie steps backward on to Kim's foot.

I asked my son,
"Who steps backward?"

and

"Whose foot was being stomp?"


Are those question asked grammatically correct?
palapaguy
Posted: Tuesday, August 08, 2017 10:07:14 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 10/28/2013
Posts: 677
Neurons: 8,413
Location: Calabasas, California, United States
bihunsedap wrote:


Everyone's waiting in a line.
Carrie steps backward on to Kim's foot.

I asked my son,
"Who steps backward?"

and

"Whose foot was being stomp?"


Are those question asked grammatically correct?


Some small corrections:
"Who stepped backward?"
"Whose foot was being stomped (stepped on)?
sureshot
Posted: Wednesday, August 09, 2017 1:47:37 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/16/2015
Posts: 1,841
Neurons: 344,173
palapaguy wrote:
bihunsedap wrote:

Everyone's waiting in a line.
Carrie steps backward on to Kim's foot.

I asked my son,
"Who steps backward?"
and
"Whose foot was being stomp?"


Are those question asked grammatically correct?


Some small corrections:
"Who stepped backward?"
"Whose foot was being stomped (stepped on)?

_________________________

In British English, the adverb form is "backwards". In American English, we say "backward". So, we can also say:

- Who stepped backwards?
Wilmar (USA)
Posted: Wednesday, August 09, 2017 10:15:39 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/4/2015
Posts: 833
Neurons: 241,693
Location: Vinton, Iowa, United States
Who stepped backwards?
Whose foot was being stepped on?

"Stomped" involves the application of more force than what is involved with simply stepping on the foot of another person. And, it is also a deliberate act.
Romany
Posted: Wednesday, August 09, 2017 1:24:37 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/14/2009
Posts: 13,779
Neurons: 42,194
Location: Brighton, England, United Kingdom

Hi, Bihunsedap - it certainly makes it easier for us to help you when we can see the book!

"Stomped" is a really good word to have in your vocabulary. As Wilmar says it really means to to hurt somebody. And to WANT to hurt them.

But some children DO say "He stomped on my foot" in an exaggerated way, or, "He pushed me" when another kid touches him to get the teacher's attention. So it's good to know what it really means.

Like they say "My shoes are killing me" when their feet hurt.
NKM
Posted: Wednesday, August 09, 2017 1:43:00 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 2/14/2015
Posts: 4,320
Neurons: 206,327
Location: Corinth, New York, United States
One more detail: We normally write "onto" as one word for this use — "… steps backward onto Kim's foot."

taurine
Posted: Wednesday, August 09, 2017 3:15:51 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 4/20/2016
Posts: 819
Neurons: 63,651
Location: South Dublin, Ireland
What about the difference between tread and stomp, please.

J'ai perdu mes amis en Afrique durant la dernière semaine de 2017
Sarrriesfan
Posted: Wednesday, August 09, 2017 3:36:15 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/30/2016
Posts: 844
Neurons: 5,379
Location: Luton, England, United Kingdom
taurine wrote:
What about the difference between tread and stomp, please.


In this context tread like step is something that might happen accidentally, stomp implies a deliberate attempt to injure the other persons foot by using a lot of force.

I lack the imagination for a witty signature.
NKM
Posted: Wednesday, August 09, 2017 5:36:13 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 2/14/2015
Posts: 4,320
Neurons: 206,327
Location: Corinth, New York, United States
True, but "step" is an everyday word; "tread" is more formal.

bihunsedap
Posted: Thursday, August 10, 2017 2:54:11 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 11/26/2014
Posts: 1,195
Neurons: 5,973
Thanks all.
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