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A sick beating at one's heart Options
Aventador LP700-4
Posted: Wednesday, August 02, 2017 7:43:51 AM
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What is the meaning of the bolded sentence?


Sir Samuel Attenbury. A sick beating at one's heart. Now - now she was at the mercy of an enemy! No more gentleness, no more questions to which she knew the answers! But he began quite mildly.

Source:
Agatha Christie's Poirot (Sad Cypress)

Does it suggest that Sir Samuel suffers from illness?
thar
Posted: Wednesday, August 02, 2017 7:56:08 AM

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No, think more metaphorically.
This is about emotions- and anticipation of enjoying someone's terror?


Think of it like 'sickening'
Eg a sickening thud
A sick felling of dread

Like when you suddenly realise you have forgotten to do something really important - a feeling so strong it makes you feel ill. That is a sick feeling.


Tfd has nothing on this! So this is Oxford:

Quote:
2.1attributive (of an emotion) so intense as to cause one to feel unwell or nauseous.
‘he had a sick fear of returning’


Romany
Posted: Wednesday, August 02, 2017 10:31:52 AM
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But the 'sick beating' is going on inside the 'her' heart. Not the 'enemy', Sir Samuel's, heart.
thar
Posted: Wednesday, August 02, 2017 11:51:11 AM

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You're right. That was my first thought, but then I lost it somehow, but now I see it again. She names him. I think I must have taken it as attribution. d'oh!

That sick (the modern equivalent would be "Oh, shit!") -beating at her heart.

I note , also, not 'beating of her heart'. A sick beating at her heart. I thing that is intentional, not just old style.
Tomahawk71
Posted: Wednesday, August 02, 2017 11:53:23 AM

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Romany wrote:

But the 'sick beating' is going on inside the 'her' heart. Not the 'enemy', Sir Samuel's, heart.

So, why did the author use "one's heart" instead of "her heart"?
Think
thar
Posted: Wednesday, August 02, 2017 3:09:54 PM

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I only earlier realised this wasn't you. I have enough trouble juggling Christie and Le Carre, and then someone goes and asks about another one.

I didn't read it fully. I was still mentally knocking off Little Indians one by one! In Baghdad, because that is my film version reference! Eh?

At least I probably know more about it than 4x4 vehicle engineering! Whistle

It sounds like the narrator is channelling her - in which case it wouldn't be 'her'. As a first person style it would be 'one' - the way you talk about yourself.
Or, in the 1930s, the way one talked about oneself.

Edit.
That is why I was confused by the quote in my earlier post.
This is narrated from the perspective of this female character who is accused of a murder.

Christie was interested in playing with the idea of the unreliable narrator - as exemplified in The Murder of Roger Ackroyd.


Quote:
one pronoun (I/ME)

formal the person speaking or writing:
Of course, one (= I) would be delighted to dine with the Queen.



Or it can mean 'you'. Or 'anyone'. Pretty useful, huh? d'oh! Whistle
Tomahawk71
Posted: Thursday, August 03, 2017 5:15:31 AM

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thar wrote:
I only earlier realised this wasn't you. I have enough trouble juggling Christie and Le Carre, and then someone goes and asks about another one.

I didn't read it fully. I was still mentally knocking off Little Indians one by one! In Baghdad, because that is my film version reference! Eh?

At least I probably know more about it than 4x4 vehicle engineering! Whistle

It sounds like the narrator is channelling her - in which case it wouldn't be 'her'. As a first person style it would be 'one' - the way you talk about yourself.
Or, in the 1930s, the way one talked about oneself.

Edit.
That is why I was confused by the quote in my earlier post.
This is narrated from the perspective of this female character who is accused of a murder.

Christie was interested in playing with the idea of the unreliable narrator - as exemplified in The Murder of Roger Ackroyd.


Quote:
one pronoun (I/ME)

formal the person speaking or writing:
Of course, one (= I) would be delighted to dine with the Queen.



Or it can mean 'you'. Or 'anyone'. Pretty useful, huh? d'oh! Whistle


Le Carre's novel is over. :)
thar
Posted: Thursday, August 03, 2017 5:23:17 AM

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What, no more public school argot?
Boo hoo!
Tomahawk71
Posted: Friday, August 04, 2017 2:58:15 AM

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thar wrote:
What, no more public school argot?
Boo hoo!


No. Sorry. :-)
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