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You will hear a man talking/talk about his hobby. Options
EnglishFanatic92
Posted: Sunday, July 23, 2017 12:37:01 PM
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Joined: 6/14/2016
Posts: 60
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Hello all!


1) You will hear a man talking about his hobby.

2) You will hear a man talk about his hobby.

In which context could I use the second example? Could the second one have the same meaning as the first one in certain situations?

I thought I knew the rule for these verbs of senses but it seems to me it works differently with the future tenses. But I might be wrong.

Thanks.
leonAzul
Posted: Sunday, July 23, 2017 2:00:21 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 8/11/2011
Posts: 7,988
Neurons: 25,260
Location: Miami, Florida, United States
EnglishFanatic92 wrote:
Hello all!


1) You will hear a man talking about his hobby.

2) You will hear a man talk about his hobby.

In which context could I use the second example? Could the second one have the same meaning as the first one in certain situations?

I thought I knew the rule for these verbs of senses but it seems to me it works differently with the future tenses. But I might be wrong.

Thanks.


I hear the difference as being quite subtle. Sentence 1) means literally hearing the man uttering words in a particular instance. Sentence 2) means something more like hearing a man expressing himself on a particular topic. In most cases, the interpretation is the same. The difference would come about if greater emphasis were to be made on the sounds a man is making or the ideas he is expressing.

"Make it go away, Mrs Whatsit," he whispered. "Make it go away. It's evil."
EnglishFanatic92
Posted: Sunday, July 23, 2017 2:34:08 PM
Rank: Member

Joined: 6/14/2016
Posts: 60
Neurons: 380
leonAzul wrote:
EnglishFanatic92 wrote:
Hello all!


1) You will hear a man talking about his hobby.

2) You will hear a man talk about his hobby.

In which context could I use the second example? Could the second one have the same meaning as the first one in certain situations?

I thought I knew the rule for these verbs of senses but it seems to me it works differently with the future tenses. But I might be wrong.

Thanks.


I hear the difference as being quite subtle. Sentence 1) means literally hearing the man uttering words in a particular instance. Sentence 2) means something more like hearing a man expressing himself on a particular topic. In most cases, the interpretation is the same. The difference would come about if greater emphasis were to be made on the sounds a man is making or the ideas he is expressing.


I have come across mainly with sentences using gerund - in English textbooks preparing students for certain exams I was usually going to hear an interview of a man talking about his hobby etc. and had to write the correct asnwers into columns etc. So I thought it might be better to use a non gerund version "talk" as I would hear the WHOLE interview.
EnglishFanatic92
Posted: Wednesday, July 26, 2017 5:09:03 PM
Rank: Member

Joined: 6/14/2016
Posts: 60
Neurons: 380
...so it makes me feel little unsure if the non- gerund version could really be used in sentences which I can find in those examples from thebooks I mentioned in my last post - wonder if the situations allow me to use "talk".
Because as I have said, it is always the whole inteview one is going to listen to...
NKM
Posted: Wednesday, July 26, 2017 6:51:00 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 2/14/2015
Posts: 3,759
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Location: Corinth, New York, United States
Just a quick note --

In "… a man talking about his hobby", "talking" is a participle, not a gerund.

leonAzul
Posted: Wednesday, July 26, 2017 7:47:52 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 8/11/2011
Posts: 7,988
Neurons: 25,260
Location: Miami, Florida, United States
NKM wrote:
Just a quick note --

In "… a man talking about his hobby", "talking" is a participle, not a gerund.



That is an excellent observation.

We native speakers of English take the distinction among the "-ing" forms of the verbs quite naturally since we were four or five years old. Because I have been immersed in several languages and cultures as an adult, I have a certain empathy for those who study English as a foreign language. On the surface, English seems to be simple because the conjugations and declensions have been minimized [sic] over time. Yet the distinctions of time and proximity that find expression in other languages through tense and case exist in modern English, albeit in different forms.

That is the clue: to find the form that best correlates to what you intend in your native language. ;^)

This is an excellent place to discover how that works through conversation with native speakers of English, and a number of persons who wish to attain fluency in English. If you are looking for a teacher, then you need to look elsewhere. The emphasis here has always been on conversation about the English language. ;^)

Here is a challenge to other native speakers of English: Is it possible to form a response without the use of a participle or gerund, that is to say, a word without an "-ing" on the end of it?

It is a curious challenge that often has the result of more robust and vibrant [I cheated] language.
Think

"Make it go away, Mrs Whatsit," he whispered. "Make it go away. It's evil."
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