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your five dollars vs five dollars of yours Options
robjen
Posted: Sunday, July 16, 2017 4:41:29 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 2/17/2015
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I have heard this both ways.

(ex) Your friend is .... or A friend of yours is ....

If it is acceptable, are my examples correct below?

(1) I'm sorry for wasting your five dollars.

(2) I'm sorry for wasting five dollars of yours.

Thanks a lot.

Romany
Posted: Sunday, July 16, 2017 5:50:07 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/14/2009
Posts: 12,595
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Location: Brighton, England, United Kingdom

In classes and text-books quite a bit of time is spent phrasing sentences in different ways to help the learner figure out the way the words function.

However, in both spoken or written English, we always use the short-form: "Your friend is" not A friend of yours is", "Sorry for wasting your five dollars." (remember, if you are standing right in front of someone, there's no need for "I" - who else would it be?).




NKM
Posted: Sunday, July 16, 2017 9:37:44 AM

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Joined: 2/14/2015
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Location: Corinth, New York, United States
We can say "a friend of yours" to mean "someone who is your friend", but that's much less definite than "your friend".

If I say "I met a friend of yours yesterday," I must expect you to immediately ask me "Who?"

- "Is that man a friend of yours?"  (Maybe yes, maybe no.)

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