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What does he say? Options
Helenej
Posted: Friday, July 14, 2017 8:04:22 AM

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Can you kindly tell me what the teacher says at 20:02 before the words "Time's fleet", please?

youtube.com/watch?v=iRFix4HEPis
Sarrriesfan
Posted: Friday, July 14, 2017 8:06:41 AM
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Helenj

Your link is broken, you might need to repost it.

I lack the imagination for a witty signature.
IMcRout
Posted: Friday, July 14, 2017 9:54:45 AM

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I think the teacher says, 'Heather (?family name?), are you asleep?'
I wouldn't put any bets on it, though.

I totally take back all those times I didn't want to nap when I was younger. (Anon)
Helenej
Posted: Friday, July 14, 2017 3:29:28 PM

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FounDit
Posted: Friday, July 14, 2017 5:04:48 PM

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Helenej wrote:
Can you kindly tell me what the teacher says at 20:02 before the words "Time's fleet", please?

youtube.com/watch?v=iRFix4HEPis


After stating the students will have two minutes to solve the math problems, he takes out his watch and says "Tempus fugit, time, please". At least that's what I hear.

What he means is "time flies, so begin now", or "your time starts now".


A great many people will think they are thinking when they are merely rearranging their prejudices. ~ William James ~
thar
Posted: Friday, July 14, 2017 5:34:11 PM

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I hear :

Tempus fugit.
Time is fleet.


I thought of 'flee' but I hear a t at the end.
Fleet - swift.
(Fleeting = ephemeral, passes by very quickly and disappears)

"Tempus fugit" is normally translated as 'time flies' - but fugere is actually 'to escape, run away' - eg fugitive.
As well as to pass quickly, to fly.


Quote:

Virgil:
sed fugit interea fugit irreparabile tempus
(“but it flees meanwhile: irretrievable time flees)


English may be a pain to !earn, but it is value for money - you get free Latin Whistle
IMcRout
Posted: Saturday, July 15, 2017 1:47:51 AM

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Brick wall Brick wall Brick wall d'oh!

I've never understood the English pronunciation of Latin words - or Greek characters, for that matter.

I totally take back all those times I didn't want to nap when I was younger. (Anon)
mactoria
Posted: Saturday, July 15, 2017 3:05:29 AM
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Agree with Thar's version, "tempus fugit, time is fleet" or possible "tempus fugit, time's fleet." Given how rigid the character seems to be, it's likely he doesn't use the contraction "time's" but the quality of my speakers made it sound like his tongue slid over the "s" sound.
thar
Posted: Saturday, July 15, 2017 6:41:26 AM

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Yes, I was expanding the contraction for clarity.

(I see you actually got that, in the OP, but otherx, including me, had trouble because 'time is fleet' is an odd expression. It is not a fixed phrase. 'Time is fleeting', , maybe. 'Tempus fugit' on the other hand, is very well-known.
A cultural meme.


As for pronunciation - I guess it suffers from the disconnect. Mediaeval scribes could read Latin and Ancient Greek, but they never heard it from the source. Mediaeval Latin, Church Latin - as a language that developed long after classical Rome had fallen, everyone gets to make it up, and mangle it according to their own influences. Whistle

It becomes a way of saying things you don't want to say in ordinary language. You live daily life in Anglo-Saxon, describe things in French, do science in Greek and declare profoundly in Latin!






Time flees, love remains.


I think this is mangled grammar. 'sic' means so, thus - not so, therefore.Think

And, 'excuse my French' as they say.




Street art, Amsterdam. "Tempus Fugit".
IMcRout
Posted: Saturday, July 15, 2017 6:50:24 AM

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I totally take back all those times I didn't want to nap when I was younger. (Anon)
thar
Posted: Saturday, July 15, 2017 6:57:39 AM

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Whistle
Helenej
Posted: Saturday, July 15, 2017 9:59:44 AM

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Location: Kiev, Kyiv City, Ukraine
Thank you very much. I would never make it out. I thought the phrase was in English. To be honest, even if I had known the phrase was in Latin, it wouldn't help much.

Before asking, I had looked up the subtitles on the internet and all it read "Come, come" instead of "Tempus fugit". Strange, isn't it?
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