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Difference between grow and come in a context Options
Hemant Patel 1
Posted: Tuesday, July 11, 2017 9:32:47 PM

Rank: Newbie

Joined: 4/26/2016
Posts: 8
Neurons: 470
What is the difference in the sentences below?

I grew to appreciate her in a moment.
I came to appreciate her in a moment.

I grew to think bad things about him.
I came to think bad things about him.

I grew to misunderstand the situation.
I came to misunderstand the situation.
Kunstniete
Posted: Wednesday, July 12, 2017 1:53:14 AM

Rank: Member

Joined: 1/25/2017
Posts: 902
Neurons: 104,088
Location: Berlin, Berlin, Germany
Hi Hemant Patel 1,

I'm not a native speaker, but I think "grow" is generally used for things which thrive or prosper - things which mostly grow physically. Mostly plants or animals, I'm not entirely sure if "grow" is used that often for non-physical things like ideas or plans. For personal development, like in your examples, (be)come is mainly used. So I would say in all three examples the came-versions sound better.

The value of choice is not in the size of the action but in its effect.
FounDit
Posted: Wednesday, July 12, 2017 11:16:09 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/19/2011
Posts: 8,130
Neurons: 43,369
Hemant Patel 1 wrote:
What is the difference in the sentences below?

I grew to appreciate her in a moment.
The word "grew" is often used to show an increase over time. In a sentence such as this, we might say, "I grew to appreciate her sense of humor over the months we spent together". Using "a moment" would not make sense and we wouldn't normally use it for that idea.

I came to appreciate her in a moment.
Here, the word "came" indicates an arrival point. It carries the sense of "I came to a point in time". So the first indicates an increase over time, while the second indicates the arrival point in time. For a native speaker, the sentence would sound more natural if you said, "I came to appreciate her in that moment". The same holds true for the other sentences below.


I grew to think bad things about him in the time we worked together.
I came to think bad things about him at that moment.
While these sentences are understandable, we would probably word them differently by using "began to think", as Kunstniete says.

I grew to misunderstand the situation.
I came to misunderstand the situation.
These would not be said because understanding should increase over time, not misunderstanding. It wouldn't make sense.


A great many people will think they are thinking when they are merely rearranging their prejudices. ~ William James ~
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