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What do you call this type of house? Options
luckyguy
Posted: Tuesday, July 11, 2017 3:29:59 AM
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Last year, I traveled to my home country and took a photo of the house my ancestors lived. It's very old. I think it's at least 120 years.

I am going to show my friend the photo. I am not sure what "type" of house it is.

Do you call it:

(1) my ancestors' house

(2) my ancestor house

(3) my ancestry house

What do you call it? Thanks a lot.
thar
Posted: Tuesday, July 11, 2017 4:13:38 AM

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If your family lived there for a long time (a hundred years at the very least) and still live here or left quite recently, it is your ancestral home.


Otherwise, I would just say it is the house where my family lived. Then you can say when. To me, anything within a couple of hundred years is family.
An 'ancestor' suggests something more removed, at least four or five hundred years ago, and probably more. Anything more recent than that is just family.


Ashwin Joshi
Posted: Tuesday, July 11, 2017 5:01:26 AM

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Write;

My ancestral home.

Me Gathering Pebbles at The Seashore.-Aj
Romany
Posted: Tuesday, July 11, 2017 12:43:10 PM
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In BE it would differ, however.

An ancestral house to us would have to have been lived in for at least 300 years; but most would date from the Restoration (late 17C) and some over a thousand.

Now the only kinds of houses which would last that long would be solid brick and/or stone...and the only persons who were able to afford brick and stone would be the elite.

So the phrase "my ancestral home" becomes very pretentious unless one's family lived in a castle or a palace. And even then it would sound as though one were showing off - so we use 'Family home'. That is more egalitarian - it can apply to a two bedroom cottage or a vast, sprawling Manor House.
Ashwin Joshi
Posted: Wednesday, July 12, 2017 4:34:31 AM

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I respectfully disagree.
Romany's understanding that a only a big home is called "an ancestral home" is not digestible.
Old homes used to be giant houses is a different matter.

Ancestral home of famous Indian Film actor Dalip Kumar is a very small house in Pakisatn, This has been given the status of Heritage site.



And the following Brobdingnagian structure can also be an ancestral home.



Me Gathering Pebbles at The Seashore.-Aj
Sarrriesfan
Posted: Wednesday, July 12, 2017 6:43:15 AM
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With all respect Ashwin, Romany did explain that her comment was explaining how we use the term ancestral home in British English.

I would also not say that it was "not digestible" it's not natural English to me.
I might say that her explanation was incorrect I my opnion.


I lack the imagination for a witty signature.
Romany
Posted: Thursday, July 13, 2017 3:26:50 AM
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I think the problem may lie here in the fact that in Indian English 'Ancestor' is used where we'd use 'forebear' or simply 'Family'. In other words, while 'ancestor' is to us (as defined in the Oxford) a remote forebear - further removed than grandparents. From what I've gathered now, in Indian English there's no such distinction.

Sarries - where I work we have responsibility for the Blue Plaque initiative so I've become very familiar with all these terms. If you look up 'Ancestral Homes" on Google you'll find only large estates and Manor houses - no two-up-two-down brick bungalows.

There is also, in UK, the point that one's ancestral home could be far away and you've never even seen it. If one is a Cavendish for example, there are still 3 Cavendish estates extant. If one's name is 'Cavendish' there's a possibility that one of them could be your "Ancestral Home" even though it's been a couple of hundred years since any of your own branch of Cavendishes may have lived there.

(Am I helping to clarify or only muddling things up more?)
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Thursday, July 13, 2017 4:18:00 AM

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Yes - you do find blue plaques on two-up-and-two-down terraced houses - but you'd never hear of them being called 'ancestral homes'.

"The Birthplace of Arthur Lowe" not "The Ancestral Home of Arthur Lowe".



************
Hi luckyguy!

If the house is about 120 years old, I would probably call it "The house where my grandparents grew up".


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Ashwin Joshi
Posted: Thursday, July 13, 2017 10:44:51 AM

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DragOsir is right;


"The Birthplace of Arthur Lowe" not "The Ancestral Home of Arthur Lowe".

Both the sentences are correct.

One needs to know which context it is to be used.
In the present circumstances the attention has been drawn to secern or mark the birthplace. To identify the ancestral house, the blue board would have been written otherwise.


"This is the birthplace of Arthur Lowe where his (her) ancestors lived." is more appropriate.

Me Gathering Pebbles at The Seashore.-Aj
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Thursday, July 13, 2017 11:16:09 AM

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Quote:
"This is the birthplace of Arthur Lowe where his (her) ancestors lived." is more appropriate.

Not really. It is a fairly recent building (a stone-built terrace of that sort would probably be from the late 1800s by my guess). Maybe his great-grandparents lived there, maybe his grandparents, but not really ancestors.

an·ces·tor n.
1. A person from whom one is descended, especially if more remote than a grandparent; a forebear.

American Heritage
ancestor n
1. (often plural) a person from whom another is directly descended, esp someone more distant than a grandparent; forefather

Collins English Dictionary

Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Ashwin Joshi
Posted: Thursday, July 13, 2017 12:15:14 PM

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No noun.
Please explain adjective 'ancestral'.

Me Gathering Pebbles at The Seashore.-Aj
Romany
Posted: Thursday, July 13, 2017 12:19:36 PM
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Ashwin - As I said above: - it's just a difference between Indian English and British English. In the same way as we say "Autumn" and AE says "Fall".
- it is not a question of whose usage is 'right' and whose is 'wrong'.

Millions of people come from all over the world to see where William Shakespeare was born and lived. They are not, however, his "ancestral homes" and is not described as such

Drago - slight misunderstanding: I didn't mean there were no 2 ups/2 downs with Blue Plaques - we even have a school bomb shelter with a blue plaque here - but that we never get to put blue plaques on "Ancestral Homes". They kinda speak for themselves, don't they?
Ashwin Joshi
Posted: Thursday, July 13, 2017 12:25:57 PM

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I agree, Romany.

Me Gathering Pebbles at The Seashore.-Aj
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Thursday, July 13, 2017 12:31:18 PM

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an·ces·tral adj.
Of, relating to, or evolved from an ancestor or ancestors.


ancestral adj
of, inherited from, or derived from ancestors: his ancestral home.


he·red·i·tar·y adj.
a. Passed down from one generation to the next


hereditary adj
2.(Law) law
a. descending or capable of descending to succeeding generations by inheritance


Something hereditary can come from just one generation back.
In British English, something ancestral is from ancestors - more than three generations.

************
Hi Romany - I was really agreeing with you on the idea of 'ancestral home'.
The idea of a terraced house being considered that way tickled my fancy (as they say).


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Ashwin Joshi
Posted: Thursday, July 13, 2017 12:44:02 PM

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Yes it has nothing to do with birthplace, sir.

Me Gathering Pebbles at The Seashore.-Aj
Romany
Posted: Thursday, July 13, 2017 12:44:50 PM
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Ah, then as a Scot, you'd not be aware then, that to an Englishman, sir, his home IS his castle! (Wish I handlebar moustache to bristle!)
Ashwin Joshi
Posted: Thursday, July 13, 2017 12:46:33 PM

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Ah.......I surrender.

Me Gathering Pebbles at The Seashore.-Aj
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Thursday, July 13, 2017 12:58:22 PM

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"As a Scot"!

Nay lass, I was born and raised in a very similar stone-built terrace in Lancashire - only ours didn't even have a symbolic two-foot-wide garden like that one - the front door came straight out onto the pavement.

Two down, none up . . .



Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
TMe
Posted: Thursday, July 13, 2017 1:01:36 PM

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Do you call it your ancestral home?

I am a layman.
TMe
Posted: Thursday, July 13, 2017 1:03:53 PM

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Agreeing is not defeating.

I am a layman.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Thursday, July 13, 2017 1:04:32 PM

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TMe wrote:
Do you call it your ancestral home?


No - I don't have an ancestral home - nothing which has been passed down through generation after generation for hundreds of years.

That's not my house - that's just an illustration of "An Englishman's home is his castle."

Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
TMe
Posted: Thursday, July 13, 2017 1:07:23 PM

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The concept of an ancestral house and the feelings associated with it, I am afraid, you can never appreciate, imagine or sense.

I am a layman.
Romany
Posted: Thursday, July 13, 2017 2:52:06 PM
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Aye lad, Ah knowst.

I wuz yankin' yer chain weren't I mate? Seein' as 'ow you defected, innit?

Like, uh, Hel-low? You like gave up,the y'know, right to your castle? when you went skipping over that wall? And now you have to, like, eat shortbread?
jacobusmaximus
Posted: Thursday, July 13, 2017 4:52:26 PM

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Romany wrote:

Aye lad, Ah knowst.

I wuz yankin' yer chain weren't I mate? Seein' as 'ow you defected, innit?

Like, uh, Hel-low? You like gave up,the y'know, right to your castle? when you went skipping over that wall? And now you have to, like, eat shortbread?


Naw 'e disnae! It's cauld purrich for him! Aye an' oot the drawer!

A clear conscience is the sign of a fuzzy memory.
leonAzul
Posted: Thursday, July 13, 2017 10:01:42 PM

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Romany wrote:

And now you have to, like, eat shortbread?


And Lúnasa only sixteen days away…
Whistle


"Make it go away, Mrs Whatsit," he whispered. "Make it go away. It's evil."
srirr
Posted: Friday, July 14, 2017 4:22:11 AM

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Well, it may be regional impact that different versions of English may have (slightly) different use of same words. As Romany said, in IE and BE, it is different. We should not forget that English is not the first language for we Indians and hence there is a tendency of translating the Indian vocabulary to English with similar connotation. For us too, an ancestor is a forbear but in common day-to-day conversation, great grandfather or so is often termed as ancestor. Same goes with the houses. If my 3 or 4 generations lived in the same house, it is often called as my ancestral home (without bothering about the size).

An interesting point I would like to add that although we may link ourselves to an ancestor even 1000 years back, the most common saying or understanding about a lineage is linked to seven generations. If I can link a house (or a custom or a belonging or anything) to seven generations from myself, it is my ancestral.

Other similar terms that we use are parental home (remember not ancestral) for houses where my father or may be grandfather lived. And the native house which was occupied by my father and where I was born.

We are responsible for what we are, and whatever we wish ourselves to be, we have the power to make ourselves. ~ Swami Vivekanand
Romany
Posted: Friday, July 14, 2017 6:31:37 AM
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Thank you Srirr, for the above post - which clearly states the difference for all of us, and clears up any misunderstanding of terms.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Friday, July 14, 2017 8:10:27 PM

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Quote:
Lúnasa only sixteen days away…


Are they coming to the Edinburgh Fringe? Love to see them . . .



and hear them (click on the picture).

*********
Still get black puddin', though - but they fry it up here instead of cookin' it proper like in Lancashire!




Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Romany
Posted: Saturday, July 15, 2017 4:09:41 AM
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Drago -

All I know about black pudding is that people have it as part of a fry-up. So how is it served in Lancashire?
Sarrriesfan
Posted: Saturday, July 15, 2017 4:50:47 AM
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As I understand it its simmered in hot water like you would a hotdog sausage and then eaten.

It reminds me of a story from my past, I was attending a friends wedding as his best man in Miami, he was marrying a person of Cuban decent. We were taken to a traditional restaurant by her brothers. They did the ordering and the waiters brought out some Moronga to eat, a traditional Cuban blood sausage, we just ate it without blanching, it's just like spicy Balck pudding.

It's at that point that the brides brothers decided we were alright after all, it was a test most white Americans in their opnion would have kicked up,a stink,about it. That may not be true but that's what they thought.

I lack the imagination for a witty signature.
Romany
Posted: Saturday, July 15, 2017 6:07:18 AM
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Sarries - then you're a better man than I am, Gunga Din.

I don't know if I could bring myself to do it - even for a fiancee!!
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Saturday, July 15, 2017 7:58:06 PM

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Purely psychological!

The spice and herbs are different, but burgers, black pudding, hot dog, German wurst, English sausage, haggis and liver pâté are all similar . . .

A lot more palatable than a lot of things people eat - snails, raw shellfish, snakes . . .



Cooking Guide - The Bury Black Pudding Company
link
Fill a pan with water and bring to a gentle simmer. Add the black pudding to the pan in the skin / sleeve. Do not let the water boil as this may cause the skin to split and the pudding will take on water and go mushy. Allow the black pudding to heat for 6-8 minutes.

Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Romany
Posted: Monday, July 17, 2017 6:33:33 AM
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Jacob - sorry I missed your post above - made me smile too!
Lang may yer lum reek, boyo.
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