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Go peeping Options
Joe Kim
Posted: Sunday, July 09, 2017 11:06:33 PM

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You say to your child:

"Go peeping" , is this ok too?

IMcRout
Posted: Monday, July 10, 2017 6:14:11 AM

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I cannot think of a single reason why I should say that to my children.

May it would help if you could tell us in what kind of situation you'd want to say that.

I totally take back all those times I didn't want to nap when I was younger. (Anon)
srirr
Posted: Monday, July 10, 2017 6:46:40 AM

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I would also think the same. Why should I ask my child for peeping (in) somewhere? The context may make the question clearer.

Joe, by any chance do you mean 'peeing'?



We are responsible for what we are, and whatever we wish ourselves to be, we have the power to make ourselves. ~ Swami Vivekanand
NKM
Posted: Monday, July 10, 2017 9:14:38 AM

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If you mean "peeing", you might say "Go pee-pee."

Wilmar (USA)
Posted: Monday, July 10, 2017 11:18:13 AM

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If that's what you mean, then tell the child to "use the toilet", or "go potty".
Joe Kim
Posted: Monday, July 10, 2017 3:46:53 PM

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Thank you everyone.

It is PEEING.


If I say go peeing, instead go pee-pee, does it ask him to pee for a long long time? Why wouldn't you say "go peeing"

Romany
Posted: Tuesday, July 11, 2017 8:02:43 AM
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You can't use "peeing" with "Go". You wouldn't say "Go playing", or "Go eating" would you? You'd say "Go and play" or "Go and eat". So: - It would be "Go and pee." However, it is the custom with young children to use the diminutive "pee-pee".

Usually we say "Go pee-pee" or "Go do pee-pee".
Joe Kim
Posted: Wednesday, July 12, 2017 1:30:17 AM

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Thank you.

But Go swimming, go shopping.

I see there is a big difference in the length of time, but -ing is not always that long for everything, is it? So why not go peeing?
NKM
Posted: Wednesday, July 12, 2017 6:35:55 PM

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If you're looking for a logical answer, you're out of luck. After all, it's English.

The real answer is just that we don't say it that way. We don't know why; it's simply a matter of custom.

almo 1
Posted: Wednesday, July 12, 2017 7:42:37 PM
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quote: www.eslcafe.com/grammar/verbs_other_verbs


Gerunds are often used in combinations after the verb go.
These combinations generally show leisure-time activities.
They are not used for sports, games, or work.



Special Notes:


1. Combinations of go and a gerund aren't
normally used for competitive sports:


3. Some combinations of go and a gerund
are used only at particular times of the year:

go caroling = travel from house to house
singing Christmas songs (at Christmas only)


4. Combinations of go and a gerund can often
be made specific:

go hunting ---> go deer hunting /


6. Remember: Combinations of go and
a gerund are generally used for leisure-time
activities. (We do not say *go working or
*go studying, for example.)


unquote
Romany
Posted: Thursday, July 13, 2017 3:35:00 AM
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Location: Brighton, England, United Kingdom

Thanks NK and Almo - I overlooked this thread and didn't get back to respond to the question which you've now sorted.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Thursday, July 13, 2017 4:37:24 AM

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That's a good little article Almo - someone has spent a good bit of time working out the patterns "When do we say 'go -ing' and when don't we?"

I disagree with one of their examples though:

3. Some combinations of go and a gerund
are used only at particular times of the year:

go caroling = travel from house to house

singing Christmas songs (at Christmas only) singing seasonal songs (in their own seasons only) - there are midsummer carols, May-Day carols, Christmas carols, Easter carols




Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
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