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To go over? Options
Tomahawk71
Posted: Saturday, July 08, 2017 2:15:32 AM

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Location: İstanbul, Istanbul, Turkey
What does "to go over" mean here, please?


"Then he went over."

thar
Posted: Saturday, July 08, 2017 2:54:50 AM

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He was Chapel. Then he went over.
What's the other side from Chapel?

Chapel is non-conformist Protestant Christianity- as opposed to Church, which is conformist Protestant Christianity.

So, going over to the other side? My guess is going mainstream, Church of England. Anglican.
I don't think it could mean Catholicism, - that is far more extreme than just 'giving over'. And going over to C of E fits in with his desire to become part of the establishment.


I am assuming he was Baptist, because 'Tabernacle' sounds Baptist to me. But I'm no expert. He could have been another non-conformist denomination, such as Methodist.
Then he went over [to the other side]. The 'Establishment'.
Think Darth Vader. Whistle


Some context, in humour:
Quote:
Boyton in Cornwall. It was a small village with two places of worship – one at either end of the main street. One was a church and the other a chapel, a situation which posed an existential question.

“Are you Church or Chapel?” was the question posed to my mother one day after we moved into a house in a small Cornish village. We’d moved there from our previous home – also in a small Cornish village.

Church or Chapel? It was an important question, for it defined the social circle we would be joining, our emotional support team, and ultimately our chances of salvation. The Church of England and the Methodist Chapel were the two places of worship in the village, one the establishment religion and the other dissident. The chapel stood at one end of the one street in the village, and the church was firmly at the other end. The blacksmith’s shop, with its fiery orange furnace, the heavy clink of hammer on anvil and the burning smell of sizzling horses’ hooves, stood right in the centre.


Tomahawk71
Posted: Saturday, July 08, 2017 3:07:42 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 1/7/2010
Posts: 380
Neurons: 121,606
Location: İstanbul, Istanbul, Turkey
thar wrote:
He was Chapel. Then he went over.
What's the other side from Chapel?

Chapel is non-conformist Protestant Christianity- as opposed to Church, which is conformist Protestant Christianity.

So, going over to the other side? My guess is going mainstream, Church of England. Anglican.
I don't think it could mean Catholicism, - that is far more extreme than just 'giving over'. And going over to C of E fits in with his desire to become part of the establishment.


I am assuming he was Baptist, because 'Tabernacle' sounds Baptist to me. But I'm no expert. He could have been another non-conformist denomination, such as Methodist.
Then he went over [to the other side]. The 'Establishment'.
Think Darth Vader. Whistle


Some context, in humour:
Quote:
Boyton in Cornwall. It was a small village with two places of worship – one at either end of the main street. One was a church and the other a chapel, a situation which posed an existential question.

“Are you Church or Chapel?” was the question posed to my mother one day after we moved into a house in a small Cornish village. We’d moved there from our previous home – also in a small Cornish village.

Church or Chapel? It was an important question, for it defined the social circle we would be joining, our emotional support team, and ultimately our chances of salvation. The Church of England and the Methodist Chapel were the two places of worship in the village, one the establishment religion and the other dissident. The chapel stood at one end of the one street in the village, and the church was firmly at the other end. The blacksmith’s shop, with its fiery orange furnace, the heavy clink of hammer on anvil and the burning smell of sizzling horses’ hooves, stood right in the centre.




Thank you Thar. As far as I understand, what we should know is that Stanley simply changed sides. Am I correct?
thar
Posted: Saturday, July 08, 2017 3:13:13 AM

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Joined: 7/8/2010
Posts: 15,290
Neurons: 60,813
Well, they are not really sides. They don't oppose each other. What he did was abandon the culture he was brought up in, to join one that had more of the image and connections he wanted.

Tomahawk71
Posted: Saturday, July 08, 2017 3:46:29 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 1/7/2010
Posts: 380
Neurons: 121,606
Location: İstanbul, Istanbul, Turkey
thar wrote:
Well, they are not really sides. They don't oppose each other. What he did was abandon the culture he was brought up in, to join one that had more of the image and connections he wanted.



I see. Thank you!
tunaafi
Posted: Saturday, July 08, 2017 3:48:01 AM

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Joined: 6/3/2014
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Location: Karlín, Praha, Czech Republic
'Going over' has a sense to me of deserting to the enemy.
thar
Posted: Saturday, July 08, 2017 2:38:44 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/8/2010
Posts: 15,290
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Umm. Yeah.
Looking further on, I can see how they considered this - this wording suggests struggle, so I guess they do see it as coming from an adversarial history:
"Chapel was something we'd stood up for and won. Like the vote."

(I'm not sure it's true - the North, and other industrial areas, were strong non-conformist areas, with many powerful industrialists from that background. The battle against persecution was long since won. Think )


But just leaving, after that, is a basic betrayal of what everyone before you had fought for.
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