The Free Dictionary  
mailing list For webmasters
Welcome Guest Forum Search | Active Topics | Members

Gift and... Options
Tomahawk71
Posted: Saturday, July 01, 2017 7:30:39 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 1/7/2010
Posts: 380
Neurons: 121,606
Location: İstanbul, Istanbul, Turkey

Hi all,
Rectory:
1. The house in which a parish priest or minister lives.
2.
a. An Anglican rector's dwelling.
b. An Anglican rector's office and benefice.

That's okay.
Then, vicarage:
1. The residence of a vicar.
2. The benefice of a vicar.
3. The duties or office of a vicar; a vicariate.


Who is a vicar?
1.
a. An Anglican parish priest in a parish where historically someone other than the priest was entitled to the tithes.
b. A cleric in charge of a chapel in the Episcopal Church of the United States.
2. An Anglican or Roman Catholic cleric who acts for or represents another, often higher-ranking member of the clergy.


Are these two positions, the vicar and the Anglican rector or parish priest different?
Does the speaker talks about two entirely different buildings?
And what does "The vicarage is still within the school's gift" mean, please?
Is the vicarage a gift given by the school to the speaker?


'I am not ashamed of the Victorian taste,' said D'Arcy as he slowly opened the gate; 'but then, I am afraid we are not close to the modern idiom at Carne. This house used to be the rectory for North Fields Church, but the church is now served by a priest-in-charge from the Abbey. The vicarage is still within the school's gift, and I was fortunate enough to receive it. Good night. You must come for sherry before you go. Do you stay long?'
thar
Posted: Saturday, July 01, 2017 9:27:21 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/8/2010
Posts: 15,290
Neurons: 60,813
Not 'given' as that word is normally used.


This is just my understanding, from reading stories, so I might have some things wrong.

The appointment of vicars in England was tied up with landowners' priviledges.

The landowner (now the school) could in the past appoint the local vicar, and the vicarage came with the job.
But now there is no vicar - services at the church are held by a priest from the abbey.
So the house is not being used by a vicar.
But it is still in the gift of the school - the school can let someone live there. They do not give them the house. They give them the right to live in the house.

Yes, a vicar or rector is Anglican, in the Church of England.
The difference between a vicar and rector is a technical one about who controls the Church they run, so most parishes in England have a vicar. But the job is the same - they are both the parish priest.


A 'priest' is a general term for any religion. A parish is an administrative and legal land unit in England, and predates the Protestant religion. But the Church of England became the state religion, so it would normally refer to the Anglican Church.

But a parish priest also just means the priest of the local Christan church, servicing a geographical area. So that could be Catholic, depending on context. But not other religions, and not all Christian sects.
It will usually be clear in context because a vicar or rector must be Anglican. A Catholic parish priest can live in a rectory but is not called a rector! Whistle
Tomahawk71
Posted: Saturday, July 01, 2017 9:47:42 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 1/7/2010
Posts: 380
Neurons: 121,606
Location: İstanbul, Istanbul, Turkey
thar wrote:
Not 'given' as that word is normally used.


This is just my understanding, from reading stories, so I might have some things wrong.

The appointment of vicars in England was tied up with landowners' priviledges.

The landowner (the school) can appoint a vicar, and the vicarage comes with the job.
But now there is no vicar - services at the church are held by a priest from the abbey.
So the house is not being used by a vicar.
But it is still in the gift of the school - the school can let someone live there. They do not give them the house. They give them the right to live in the house.

Yes, a vicar or rector is Anglican, in the Church of England.
The difference between a vicar and rector is a technical one about who controls the Church they run, so most parishes in England have a vicar. But the job is the same - they are both the parish priest.


A 'priest' is a general term for any religion. A parish is an administrative and legal land unit in England, and predates the Protestant religion. But the Church of England became the state religion, so it would normally refer to the Anglican Church.

But a parish priest also just means the priest of the local Christan church, servicing a geographical area. So that could be Catholic, depending on context. But not other religions, and not all Christian sects.
It will usually be clear in context because a vicar or rector must be Anglican. A Catholic parish priest can live in a rectory but is not called a rector! Whistle


***

So, the rectory and the vicarage are the same building, aren't they? Or just the opposite?
Sarrriesfan
Posted: Saturday, July 01, 2017 9:51:01 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/30/2016
Posts: 559
Neurons: 3,612
Location: Luton, England, United Kingdom
Tomahawk71 wrote:

Hi all,
Rectory:
1. The house in which a parish priest or minister lives.
2.
a. An Anglican rector's dwelling.
b. An Anglican rector's office and benefice.

That's okay.
Then, vicarage:
1. The residence of a vicar.
2. The benefice of a vicar.
3. The duties or office of a vicar; a vicariate.


Who is a vicar?
1.
a. An Anglican parish priest in a parish where historically someone other than the priest was entitled to the tithes.
b. A cleric in charge of a chapel in the Episcopal Church of the United States.
2. An Anglican or Roman Catholic cleric who acts for or represents another, often higher-ranking member of the clergy.


Are these two positions, the vicar and the Anglican rector or parish priest different?
Does the speaker talks about two entirely different buildings?
And what does "The vicarage is still within the school's gift" mean, please?
Is the vicarage a gift given by the school to the speaker?


'I am not ashamed of the Victorian taste,' said D'Arcy as he slowly opened the gate; 'but then, I am afraid we are not close to the modern idiom at Carne. This house used to be the rectory for North Fields Church, but the church is now served by a priest-in-charge from the Abbey. The vicarage is still within the school's gift, and I was fortunate enough to receive it. Good night. You must come for sherry before you go. Do you stay long?'


D'Arcy is treating the two words as if they are the same, he is referring to the same building, there is a small difference between a vicar and a rector that most people at least in the Church of England.
Carne school is in Dorset in Englang so this is mostly likely an Anglican Parish, a vicar is a priest for a parish that receives funding centrally from the diocese of which it is a member, a rector is a priest for a parish that is able to fund itself. This may be because in the past a nobleman granted it land from which it is able to collect rents for example.

I don't know enough about other denominations such as the Roman Catholic Church to give an answer for them.

The school is in a postion where it has the right to allow "gift" anyone they like to live in the building, which once was home to a priest but is not anymore.

I lack the imagination for a witty signature.
thar
Posted: Saturday, July 01, 2017 10:14:01 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/8/2010
Posts: 15,290
Neurons: 60,813
Yes, it refers to the same building. They just don't want to repeat the word, for elegant writing.

In any one parish, you will only have one house where the Anglican parish priest lives. Usually called the vicarage.

A rectory can be the home of a rector, if the church has a rector instead of a vicar. Or it can be used as a more general term, and here it refers to the same building.
You wouldn't have two in the same village.
Tomahawk71
Posted: Sunday, July 02, 2017 12:57:12 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 1/7/2010
Posts: 380
Neurons: 121,606
Location: İstanbul, Istanbul, Turkey
Sarrriesfan, Thar; thank you very much.
Users browsing this topic
Guest


Forum Jump
You cannot post new topics in this forum.
You cannot reply to topics in this forum.
You cannot delete your posts in this forum.
You cannot edit your posts in this forum.
You cannot create polls in this forum.
You cannot vote in polls in this forum.

Main Forum RSS : RSS
Forum Terms and Guidelines. Copyright © 2008-2017 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.