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The History of Saffron Options
Daemon
Posted: Thursday, June 29, 2017 12:00:00 AM
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The History of Saffron

Spanning cultures, continents, and civilizations, the history of saffron in human cultivation and use reaches back more than 3,000 years. Saffron, a spice derived from the stigmas of saffron crocus plants, has been used as a seasoning, fragrance, dye, and medicine and has remained among the world's costliest substances throughout history. After saffron spread to America in the 18th c, demand grew so much that its price on the Philadelphia commodities exchange matched that of what precious metal? More...
KSPavan
Posted: Thursday, June 29, 2017 1:02:17 AM

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The History of Saffron
Spanning cultures, continents, and civilizations, the history of saffron in human cultivation and use reaches back more than 3,000 years. Saffron, a spice derived from the stigmas of saffron crocus plants, has been used as a seasoning, fragrance, dye, and medicine and has remained among the world's costliest substances throughout history.
Joel Souza
Posted: Thursday, June 29, 2017 3:30:25 PM

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history of saffron
History of saffron

Saffron crocus flowers, represented as small red tufts, are gathered by two women in a fragmentary Minoan fresco from the excavation of Akrotiri on the Aegean island of Santorini.
Human cultivation and use of saffron spans more than 3,500 years[1][2] and spans cultures, continents, and civilizations. Saffron, a spice derived from the dried stigmas of the saffron crocus (Crocus sativus), has through history remained among the world's most costly substances. With its bitter taste, hay-like fragrance, and slight metallic notes, the apocarotenoid-rich saffron has been used as a seasoning, fragrance, dye, and medicine. Saffron is a genetically monomorphic clone[3] native to Southwest Asia;[4][5] it was first cultivated in Greece.[6]
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