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Open-mindedness Options
Priscilla86
Posted: Wednesday, June 28, 2017 10:53:51 PM

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Most active TFD members are quite progressive and open-minded. Have you always been this way? Is it your culture, your upbringing, or something else that made you to be open-minded?

The greatest thing you'll ever learn is just to love and be loved in return.
srirr
Posted: Thursday, June 29, 2017 1:40:15 AM

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I am sorry, but I slightly differ from you Priscilla. There are some members (or may be many), but to me there are not 'most' members who are open-minded. I won't take any name. I feel that open-mindedness means we should be ready to understand that different people have different views on the same topic or issue. We may not agree with each other, but we should respect each other's views. I have felt that many members (knowledgeable, experienced, informed) fail to respect others' views. If there is some difference or clash of views, the discussion turns in debate and then in fight.

And the reason behind being open-minded is of course a blend of culture, upbringing, experience, and exposure. IMO, more you interact with others, more open-minded you tend to become because this always opens new angles to what you had seen. You realise that there are much more than what you know or understand.


We are responsible for what we are, and whatever we wish ourselves to be, we have the power to make ourselves. ~ Swami Vivekanand
Priscilla86
Posted: Thursday, June 29, 2017 11:11:48 AM

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Hello, srirr!

If you noticed, I wrote most active members, not most members. We may never know about the silent majority. As for the open-mindedness, take the LGBTQ issue, for example. As I understand it, these members are mostly from the older generations - my parents' or probably grandparents' generation - so they must have grown up in a time where homosexuality was viewed as a sin, immoral, wrong, etc. so I'm wondering when it all changed.


The greatest thing you'll ever learn is just to love and be loved in return.
Romany
Posted: Thursday, June 29, 2017 11:12:34 AM
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Hi Priscilla - the thing is, if one really is open-minded one isn't going to know it!

I think that, just as, if someone says they think you're attractive, you go home, look in the mirror and say "Wotha?", not seeing attractiveness at all; a person who was open-minded doesn't go around THINKING "I am open-minded". Everyone usually thinks themselves 'just normal' or 'just like everyone else'.

Since I've come back to live in England, however, I realise just how open-minded my PARENTS were. Considering they were both in their 40's when they had me I now realise that the world they were born into and lived in was a pretty rigid place, full of conventions and things that just weren't done - but the two of them must have been mavericks all their lives, I now realise!

Thank goodness they finally found each other!!
Priscilla86
Posted: Thursday, June 29, 2017 11:49:56 AM

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Romany wrote:

Hi Priscilla - the thing is, if one really is open-minded one isn't going to know it!

I think that, just as, if someone says they think you're attractive, you go home, look in the mirror and say "Wotha?", not seeing attractiveness at all;


Dunno what you're talking about, when someone says I'm attractive I right away think 'you're damn right I am' Whistle

Romany wrote:


Since I've come back to live in England, however, I realise just how open-minded my PARENTS were. Considering they were both in their 40's when they had me I now realise that the world they were born into and lived in was a pretty rigid place, full of conventions and things that just weren't done - but the two of them must have been mavericks all their lives, I now realise!

Thank goodness they finally found each other!!


That's the thing, though. I'm curious as to what makes a person open- or close-minded. It's that nature vs nurture thing. Has it always been in them? Would it matter if they were exposed during or after their formative years? Not to contradict your statement but I somewhat know that I am quite open-minded - Gosh, I know how ghastly that sounds, like you're bragging - Maybe it's better to say that I've been exposed to stuff and they make me think, make me realize my reality is not everyone else's. But my dad has also been exposed to stuff, he worked for a French company, dealt with westerners, been in business trips all around the world yet he can't seem to shake his conservative root. He holds racist, misogynist views despite his education and exposure, so what gives?


The greatest thing you'll ever learn is just to love and be loved in return.
Articulate Dreamer
Posted: Thursday, June 29, 2017 1:01:05 PM

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Priscilla86 wrote:
Most active TFD members are quite progressive and open-minded. Have you always been this way? Is it your culture, your upbringing, or something else that made you to be open-minded?


I'd agree with you, Priscilla. My experience here, especially in the past half decade definitely endorses your observation. And contrary to Romany's contention, I believe and know that I am open-minded.

I think my parents' attitudes to life, my upbringing in cosmopolitan surroundings and above all the values inculcated in my school and college were important influences. All these shaped my reading and the assimilation of what I read and what I have learnt to discard and that has been no mean contributor.

"...hold infinity in the palm of your hand and eternity in an hour"
Romany
Posted: Thursday, June 29, 2017 1:18:34 PM
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Have you ever heard the *Jesuit quote: "Give me a child until the age of 7 and I will give you the man"?

Well apart from being rampant misogynists:(for turning every child that's given them into men even if they were girls! Whistle )it would appear that, long before the establishment of psychiatry, they observed a lot about human nature and the forces that act upon us.

Anyway, behaviourists, shrinks, social scientists, educators,...have pretty much come to the same conclusion.

So: - consider if the first sounds a baby hears - and the background to all her experiences thereafter - is gunfire and shells exploding. If the first things her eyes focus on is her parents hitting each other? And those sights and sounds are an established part of the world as she learns it - amongst all the new things she experiences every day? By the time she's in Primary school she's started her first experience in socialising: and has evolved her strategy:- she'll either be a) a loner, b) defiant c) immerse herself in everything at school while never telling a soul (in the case of the parental behaviour).

And whichever one she chooses will impact on her for the rest of her life: unconsciously, it will frame how she views life even if, at the age of, say 8, they move away, make a new beginning, and her parents fall back in love with each other.

But...what all my observations have also led me to believe is that what is left out of the equation is plain, dumb, luck. Happenstance. Serendipity. Fate.

So my take on it is that it isn't either/or. I think nurture - ie our external environment - plays a huge part in a person's personality/behaviours/personal world-view. But I believe equally that it is our nature i.e. that unique combination of DNA which has culminated in a particular person;that determines how a person reacts to that external environment. When you factor in that dash of luck/co-incidence then there it is: the reason 10 different witnesses will give 10 different accounts of exactly the same incidentThink


(My belief in the above is the reason I'm never swayed by the old "Well, if I could do it, so can you." meme. I do not find the evidence at all compelling. Why on earth would I be able to do something because someone else can? Someone to whom I'm not related, who lives somewhere else, who's had different experiences to me, and with whom I have no other commonality other than as participants in the human race?Not talking )


*The Jesuits are an order of monks. They are very learned men and masters of rhetoric and debate. If someone can almost convince you that black is white you'd say they argue like a Jesuit: very cunningly. But if someone can convince you that under certain conditions black could take on the appearance of white, and white to appear black? Then he is a Jesuit!
Articulate Dreamer
Posted: Thursday, June 29, 2017 1:47:53 PM

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Interesting as always, Romany.
As someone who went to a Jesuit school and maintains a close contact with Jesuits to this day, well over half a century now, I see the validity of that statement, the apparent (hardly rampant) misogyny not withstanding.

The Bard preceded the geneticists at least in articulating the cussedness of inherent evil that could not be moulded by a caring master:

"A devil, a born devil on whose nature
Nurture can never stick, on whom my pains,
Humanely taken, all, all lost, quite lost..."

But then came the science of epigenetics and much has changed in the outlook since then. No magic wand, not yet, anyway, but the plasticity of the mental apparatus is indeed there .. exactly when does it become too late remains as of now, a moot question.

"...hold infinity in the palm of your hand and eternity in an hour"
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Thursday, June 29, 2017 7:58:32 PM

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Gosh - what a question!

I immediately thought "Well obviously, it's . . ." - then look a bit and thought "No, actually, it's more like . . .". Now I can honestly say "I don't know."

My history - I was born into a Christian family. My mother insisted on being Roman Catholic (as she was all her life). My father was an Anglican, but was baptized as a Catholic when I was about ten.
My mother has totally fixed ideas about everything. My father didn't, but didn't say much about it.
I went to Catholic schools, with nuns as my teachers from 4 years old to ten - and 'brothers' (celibate monks of the 'de la Salle' order) as teachers till I was sixteen.

So one would expect that 'by nurture' - the way I was brought up - I would be very conservative and 'fixed'.

However, as I grew up, I could see that the adults around me were (almost all) total hypocrites.
The most vocal Catholics were the least 'Christian' in their actions.
(meaning 'Christian' as the moral stance portrayed for Christ - care for the unfortunate, poor and sick; not speaking derogatorily about others, all the virtues).
These people were - not evil, but rather mean and nasty at times.
Not all, but most - and even then, they could all be truly charitable at times.
I was lucky to become familiar with (not really a friend of) my headmaster - Brother Damian. He was (of course) a staunch Catholic, but one of the best people I've known.
Also (a bit later in life) a pair of witches and a group of Buddhists who acted in a similar way to him.

It was a conscious decision, when I was twelve or so, to not be like the crowd.

I basically, through my teens (the 1960s) decided on my own moral stance - which is actually very much the same as most basic religious ones (Christianity, Buddhism, Paganism, and so on) before the dogma and mysticism twists them (even Democracy and Socialism - government by and for all the people).

It was more rebellion against a closed mind, and against being told what to think, than a 'naturally open mind'.
I'm still rebelling - I find that I still have fixed ideas, but when I recognise them, I deliberately look at the other side and find what could be right about it.



Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Articulate Dreamer
Posted: Thursday, June 29, 2017 10:43:19 PM

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Drag0nspeaker wrote:

The most vocal Catholics were the least 'Christian' in their actions.
(meaning 'Christian' as the moral stance portrayed for Christ - care for the unfortunate, poor and sick; not speaking derogatorily about others, all the virtues).
These people were - not evil, but rather mean and nasty at times.
Not all, but most - and even then, they could all be truly charitable at times.


That goes for most vocal anybody: Hindus (the religion I am born into), Moslems, Jews...

But some committed Jesuits have had profoundly affected many of us in the school we went to, for their morality and guidance was largely secular, and laced with wisdom. It certainly helped develop 'openmindedness'.

"...hold infinity in the palm of your hand and eternity in an hour"
srirr
Posted: Friday, June 30, 2017 3:27:06 AM

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Priscilla86 wrote:

That's the thing, though. I'm curious as to what makes a person open- or close-minded. It's that nature vs nurture thing. Has it always been in them? Would it matter if they were exposed during or after their formative years?


I agree with others that it is not a 'completely' this or that thing. Nurture and Nature, both are responsible for one's open-mindedness (or close-mindedness). But I feel that nurture is more vital in this aspect. And, by 'nurture' here I do not mean only the upbringing we got during our childhood or adolescence. It refers to the exposure and interactions with others which continue throughout our lives. Like Drago said, the upbringing he got till his teens is expected to make him conservative and fixed, but he chose to be not like the crowd. What could have prompted him? I reckon it was exposure to some person who were not so 'fixed' or someone who showed him that there is a lot more than what he could learn in those orthodox schools. He could see that there is some place beyond the crowd. Had he not interacted with such agencies, I doubt he would have been so 'open-minded'.

Even today, I feel I am being nurtured, by daily interactions I have with people and environment around me. There is the saying, every day is a learning day. More I learn, more my mind opens.

Priscilla, you gave the example of LGBT community. If I am an conservative and orthodox, I am likely to dislike them because of cultural or religious teachings I have (I guess most of the religions and cultures disdain it). Because I was 'taught' so. It was perhaps not in my nature, but the teachings I received made me think so. When I get new teachings, by talking to people who have different views or by reading, I will get new meanings and views.



We are responsible for what we are, and whatever we wish ourselves to be, we have the power to make ourselves. ~ Swami Vivekanand
almo 1
Posted: Friday, June 30, 2017 5:19:39 AM
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Open-mindedness



‘Vagina artist’ to marry British rock musician Mike Scott



ABC




Romany
Posted: Friday, June 30, 2017 6:04:03 AM
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A.D. -

I think you made a good point: there isn't a point where - as when we're baking a cake - we can look at ourselves or another person, and say "Right. That's it: it's ready."

Just as our education doesn't stop 'till the day we turn up our toes (die), so we are continually coming under different influences, being exposed to new things and new ideas, coming into contact with exceptional people, throughout the entire length of our lives.

Personally, I find this an exciting time to be alive - with new technology making such leaps and bounds; the increasingly global conversations and sharing we all do now; the possibilities that have blossomed within even just the last decade. Some people find it confusing and overwhelming. Now, is that because of nature or nurture?

ps - I put the 'I'm kidding' icon after the misogynist remark - it was merely a joke! And one thing for sure - if you were educated by the Jesuits then you must have had a truly excellent education. Why I shall hardly dare debate you, from now on!!
Romany
Posted: Friday, June 30, 2017 6:13:44 AM
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(Hope - I posted a response to your comments on the 'Meanwhile in Finland.. " thread; which I'd like you to read. Your post helped me through a particularly fraught couple of days!!)
Priscilla86
Posted: Friday, June 30, 2017 12:28:57 PM

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As a Southeast Asian, I am not familiar with Judaism, let alone Jesuit so thanks to Ro and A.D. for sharing, and I love the line 'you argue like a Jesuit'. I'm definitely stealing it! ;->

Drag0, you are the only person I know who can say he knows 'a pair of witches' like it was nothing (it probably is nothing, but try saying that here and you're bound to get people looking at you like a crazy person). Thanks for sharing your history. Yours is almost like mine with one little exception: I'm a minority in my country. Indonesia is home to the biggest Muslim population but it's funny how up until high school it never felt like a 'Muslim country' to me due to the circle I was running around in (went to catholic school up until high school). But then I went to the state university where it was like 99% Muslim and before you know it, I was greeting each other with "as-salaam-alaikum and wa-alaikum-salaam" like the rest of them.

A.D., yes, I mentioned LGBTQ as an example because it is one of - if not the - hot button issues of today. It was probably like racial segregation back in the day. As someone younger, I personally can't believe it was ever a thing but some members here actually lived through those days when it was still acceptable. I wonder what they felt back then and what they feel now. Did they ever think they'd see the day where segregation is a thing of the past and that interracial relationships are no longer a biggie?

=========================

One more thing, Drag0 wrote "I find that I still have fixed ideas, but when I recognise them, I deliberately look at the other side and find what could be right about it." I think the ability to meta-think like this and play the devil's advocate with oneself is one of the best abilities one could have, and one should nurture it in one's life (and ideally encourage others to do the same).

I've found that older people who are closed-minded are the ones who see life not as one continuous learning journey but as a mountain with an arbitrary 'top', that once one reaches the 'top' one would possess all the wisdom in the world and everything would be easy but as Ro says, your education only stops when you're dead. That's why I don't like it when people say they voted for certain politicians because of their unchanging policy. Some people have pointed out that the Clintons and Obama didn't start out as LGBTQ supporters. I think they are politicians and they of course would 'read the room', so to speak, so let's not get into that, but if one is presented with evidence that challenges one's firmly-held belief and one chooses to disregard them in the name of consistency, then one would come across as closed-minded rather than steadfast.

=========================

P.S. Drag0, I've always loved the name Damian, despite what The Omen has done to that name ever since d'oh! And gosh, did I hate my catholic school. It all always seemed empty to me - the teachings and everything. I remember they'd have regular confessions and they were compulsory. I used to make up sins just to get it over with Brick wall


The greatest thing you'll ever learn is just to love and be loved in return.
TMe
Posted: Friday, June 30, 2017 1:08:17 PM

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Parents' advice, surfing the net honestly for learning and polishing your brain makes you open-minded.

I love Danielle DiPirro, (“Dani”) advice



Letting go of control.

When you open your mind, you free yourself from having to be in complete control of your thoughts. You allow yourself to experience new ideas and thoughts and you challenge the beliefs you currently have.

Experiencing changes.

Opening up your mind to new ideas allows you to the opportunity to change what you think and how you view the world. Now, this doesn't mean you necessarily will change your beliefs—in fact, the process may actually reinforce your current beliefs more strongly--but thinking with an open mind gives you the option of creating positive change and stronger results.

Making yourself vulnerable.

One of the scariest (and greatest) things about seeing the world through an open mind is that you make yourself vulnerable. In agreeing to have an open-minded view of the world, you're also admitting you don't “know it all.” This vulnerability can be both terrifying and exhilarating.

Making mistakes.

Making mistakes doesn't seem like it would be much of a benefit, but I (and other Forbes contributors) have continually made the case that it is. When you allow yourself to see things from others' perspectives, you gain the opportunity to “fail up”.

Strengthening yourself.
Open-mindedness provides a platform to build upon, piling one idea on top of another. Everything you experience collectively “adds up,” strengthening the person you are and what you believe in. It's very hard to build on experiences without an open mind.


Gaining confidence.

When you live with an open mind, you have a strong sense of self. You are not confined by your own beliefs, nor nor the beliefs of others.

Being honest.


Being open-minded means being honest enough to admit that you aren't all-knowing. This understanding creates an underlying sense of authenticity that permeates the character of any person who lives with an open mind.



And One should shed pseudo Superiority Complex. (That's IMO)

I am a layman.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Saturday, July 01, 2017 8:39:29 AM

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Hello A.D. - Yes, the Jesuits are amongst the most broadly-educated people around.
I guess, due to their strong beliefs, they have very fixed ideas in some respects (the areas of theology and doctrine) - but their knowledge in law, the sciences etc, and their willingness to teach is commendable.

I also learned a lot from Thomas Aquinas (a Dominican) - his concepts of virtue and ethics formed the base of my own 'philosophy'.

Hi Priscilla.
In the environment in which I lived as a teenager, it would have been difficult not to encounter pagans and witches.
Of course, many just called themselves that to 'cause and effect' and to shock others - but there are many who really follow the ideas of the old religions.
This doesn't necessarily mean strange rituals and rites. The ideas of the brotherhood of all people, working with (not against) nature, the idea that one CAN influence one's own future - it's not all decided by god and unchangeable.
"If it hurts no-one, do as you will."



Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Hope123
Posted: Saturday, July 01, 2017 3:23:58 PM

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Priscilla,

There are some very interesting responses. This particular concept by TMe jumped out at me from the good list presented.

"Being honest


Being open-minded means being honest enough to admit that you aren't all-knowing. This understanding creates an underlying sense of authenticity that permeates the character of any person who lives with an open mind.”


I thought about your question for a couple of days and grappled with the exact definitions of progressive and open-minded.

Generally people are who they are from the influence of both nature and nurture. Experiencing something usually is a good teacher, so sometimes those with empathy know what it is like to suffer and feel for others who are in any kind of pain and are willing to let people make their own life decisions i.e. mind their own business.

Yet some children do seem to have an awareness of others and their well-being at an earlier age than others do - or at least they express it better.

Plus Drago mentions rebellion and I agree it is often involved.

One definition of being open-minded is to accept new ideas and to try to see most things from both sides of the story. However, I think if one has worked through some concepts over the years and has come to a decision about them, one may look at new ideas surrounding that topic but may not be willing to change basic premises - and still be open-minded.

Perhaps it all depends upon which stage you are at in learning about certain subjects.



Ignorance, allied with power, is the most ferocious enemy justice can have. -James Baldwin, writer
Priscilla86
Posted: Thursday, July 06, 2017 3:16:57 AM

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Hope123 wrote:
However, I think if one has worked through some concepts over the years and has come to a decision about them, one may look at new ideas surrounding that topic but may not be willing to change basic premises - and still be open-minded.

Perhaps it all depends upon which stage you are at in learning about certain subjects.



I agree, I don't think open-minded = no-holds-barred attitude. I think being open-minded means willingness to listen and not to reject or dismiss an idea outright, just because.


The greatest thing you'll ever learn is just to love and be loved in return.
almo 1
Posted: Thursday, July 06, 2017 3:41:21 AM
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almo 1 wrote:

Open-mindedness



‘Vagina artist’ to marry British rock musician Mike Scott



ABC







****************************




I heard that she's a nice woman.






FounDit
Posted: Thursday, July 06, 2017 10:23:26 AM

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Classy, really classy...Think Maybe her husband can get his penis scanned and have that expanded into a two-meter canoe. That would be even classier!...Applause


A great many people will think they are thinking when they are merely rearranging their prejudices. ~ William James ~
almo 1
Posted: Thursday, July 06, 2017 10:34:49 AM
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FounDit wrote:
Classy, really classy...Think Maybe her husband can get his penis scanned and have that expanded into a two-meter canoe. That would be even classier!...Applause





I see.

You are Korean in the name of FounDit.



TMe
Posted: Thursday, July 06, 2017 12:16:50 PM

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almo1. I am afraid. I admonish your approach. Here we are world family.

I am a layman.
will
Posted: Thursday, July 06, 2017 12:27:48 PM
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It’s important to have an open mind, but not so open that your brain falls out.


.
TMe
Posted: Thursday, July 06, 2017 12:43:58 PM

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There is word, 'limit'. This word has been added, I am sure, to the dictionary keeping various things in mind like the openness of dialogue between mom and the son , daughter and the father, the teacher and the taught, the boss and the worker; the examples are endless.

The difference between open-mindedness and limit can only be felt and imagined and not explained.

'Limit' is for daughter to sit with her father in proper dress. Open-mindedness is is to discuss ills of society, her unimaginable problems and many more socially acceptable or unacceptable innuendos.

I am not a philosopher but a normal father.



I am a layman.
Andrew Schultz
Posted: Thursday, July 06, 2017 4:41:50 PM

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Re the original question: I can be very up and down, but I suspect we all can.

I think college helped a lot. I didn't feel obliged to agree with my parents or with other teachers. I met enough people that I could reject some of what person A said, and some of what B said, but agree with them on other points, and I knew it wasn't personal.

That said I take a flyer on a lot of things, and there are certain things I block out because I feel they don't help expand my horizons. So maybe a good question is: what is it best to be closed-minded about? So I think I can't be open-minded about too many things per day, or my brain gets jumbled. For instance, I'll have a reading spree for Author X, or I'll watch all of a certain TV show's episodes, over a period of time, not worrying about seeing it all.

I think we need time to be closed-minded to study what we want, then time to be open-minded to find new ideas of stuff to look at. If I have an important project, I can't be open minded. Maybe I'm cashing in on my open mindedness. (I hope I am.)

TMe wrote:
There is word, 'limit'. This word has been added, I am sure, to the dictionary keeping various things in mind like the openness of dialogue between mom and the son , daughter and the father, the teacher and the taught, the boss and the worker; the examples are endless.

The difference between open-mindedness and limit can only be felt and imagined and not explained.

'Limit' is for daughter to sit with her father in proper dress. Open-mindedness is is to discuss ills of society, her unimaginable problems and many more socially acceptable or unacceptable innuendos.

I am not a philosopher but a normal father.



We do have to set our limits as otherwise we feel we have to understand everything, and there's simply too much.

I think I remember reading that the last person to understand all the knowledge out there lived in the 1600s, or the 1700s.

Well, one way I'd look at open-mindedness is to be able to take something that makes you say "I don't understand, but I'd like to." Of course, we can say this in bad faith.

But I do think we need boundaries to help us focus. We need the wisdom to choose what is worth understanding. And I agree there are some things we don't want to talk about. Maybe we have a friend who has secrets that aren't for us. But we can understand other things about them and maybe help them deal with their issues.

I've had people say "Don't you care about (this subject?)" which made me feel guilty about what I did find interesting, and it disrupted me.

We should have boundaries. We probably will pass on something we might've really liked. And we need to avoid echo chambers of people that agree with us. But all the same, some people are just the right sort/amount of different that we can explore things together.

It might be something as minor as two friends trading notes on favorite films and each giving a genre another chance. Or it might be two people who like the same sports team who would not have understood the other's political views otherwise. But all the same, we do need, as you say, limits. Someone who insults others may be a nice person deep down, but it's largely their responsibility to show their nice side.

I particularly enjoy the idiom section of this fine website.
Hope123
Posted: Thursday, July 06, 2017 5:19:00 PM

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will wrote:
It’s important to have an open mind, but not so open that your brain falls out.


Applause Applause Applause Very true.

::::

Yes. Boundaries and limits and lines that shoudn't be crossed. People in different cultures may have different lines.

Then there are those who deliberately cross lines to get attention, distract, or use for personal gain in their field. (Not talking here about anyone on this Forum.)

(Romany, I meant to say that I had read your post and was glad to be of help.)



Ignorance, allied with power, is the most ferocious enemy justice can have. -James Baldwin, writer
Romany
Posted: Thursday, July 06, 2017 7:46:58 PM
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Reading the replies others have posted made me think a little harder about it.

Most of the older posters (in terms of membership of the forum - not chronological age, I hasten to add.) know that I've lead quite an eventful life; and continue to do so, it transpires.

By the time I was 7 I'd already lived in 3 different countries - and travelled through lots of different cultures. I can't ever remember thinking to myself that anything was 'different' from any established, universal, position of 'normal'. I had learned instead I think, that life/normality contained infinite variety.

But that people didn't.Dancing People were the same everywhere: they loved their families - but expressed it in many different ways. The loved to laugh - but at different things. And every culture contained the same cast of characters: the villains, the gossips, the party-people - but they also appeared in different guises everywhere. And I know from those early childhood experiences - they all love children!

So I expect that's why I don't actually 'identify' with being either open/closed- minded?

What is, is. And the variety of what is, is enormous. Which is, I expect, why I am so enormously curious?
progpen
Posted: Thursday, July 06, 2017 10:33:51 PM

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Our lives begin to end the day we become silent about things that matter. ― Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.
Andrew Schultz
Posted: Friday, July 07, 2017 4:29:30 AM

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Will's quote reminded me I wanted to look for another quote I remembered: "So-and-so's mind is so open, ideas that go in go right back out."

I didn't find it, but goodreads always gives some pretty good general stuff.

http://www.goodreads.com/quotes/tag/open-mind

http://www.goodreads.com/quotes/tag/open-mindedness

I particularly enjoy the idiom section of this fine website.
FounDit
Posted: Friday, July 07, 2017 11:45:35 AM

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It's good to be open-minded about many things, but there are some things that should remain constant, also.
That reminds me of the Aaron Tippin song: "You've got to Stand for Something (or you'll fall for anything).
You've Got to Stand for Something


A great many people will think they are thinking when they are merely rearranging their prejudices. ~ William James ~
Hope123
Posted: Friday, July 07, 2017 3:35:32 PM

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https://www.authentichappiness.sas.upenn.edu/newsletters/authentichappinesscoaching/open-mindedness

"Open-mindedness is the willingness to search actively for evidence against one’s favored beliefs, plans, or goals, and to weigh such evidence fairly when it is available.

Being open-minded does not imply that one is indecisive, wishy-washy, or incapable of thinking for one’s self. After considering various alternatives, an open-minded person can take a firm stand on a position and act accordingly.

The opposite of open-mindedness is what is called the myside bias which refers to the pervasive tendency to search for evidence and evaluate evidence in a way that favors your initial beliefs. Most people show myside bias, but some are more biased than others."


Ignorance, allied with power, is the most ferocious enemy justice can have. -James Baldwin, writer
Hope123
Posted: Friday, July 07, 2017 5:30:57 PM

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I was looking for a half-remembered poem (no luck) but this came up in my searches. I thought this three-way collaboration on open- mindedness expressed the fact that we all come from different spots and thus have different views even though we are "All Under the Same Moon". Keeping that fact in mind might help when trying to put oneself in another's shoes and trying to see things from their perspective.

The Best Open-Minded Poems


Under the Same Moon -3-Way-Collaboration-

~Under the Same Moon~

P.D.
Our days are different, living under the same moon
Down here in TEXAS, life carries a different tune
This world spins on its lovely axis
Listening to our Tex-Mex of our English lexis
We share a world made with the trust of God's hand
Revealing the beauty that life continue to expand
Don't underestimate our football image of our Cow Boy land
A mysterious Mockingbird only we Texans understand
Surrounded by the sweetest Pecan trees
The Northern Winters come in like a breeze and a tease
We also have them Blue Bonnet fields that come and go
Tell me about CANADA, what makes its motion flow?
Branded like a Long Horn, with my Lone Star State pride
How about you, CHRIS A. What's up on your side?

Chris D.Aechtner
Different lives, different lands, living under the same moon,
waking up to the ghostly calls of the wild loon.
Look upon mountains and forests stretching into infinity-
mighty Sequoias and tall Douglas firs stand majestically.
I could offer stereo-typical images of hockey, snow and moose,
or sockeye salmon, maple syrup and the great Canadian goose,
but we Canucks are becoming tired of idly standing by
as the rest of the world dips its fingers into our Northern pie.
We are a nation of peaceful, open-minded hospitality,
shying away from brutality by offering liberal neutrality.
Before I blow my top as my strong emotions collide,
I should definitely step away from my nationalistic pride,
and ask about the Philippines and its tropical flair-
how about you Nikko, what is happening over there?

NIKKO P.
Oceans away, here I am, living under the same moon
Sun’s rising over there; here, dish runs away with the spoon
My sleep is whacked, so I’m wide awake when you are,
amazing how we can all be in one place even if we’re all very far
Where islands form the shape of an old man, waters hug our shores
Tropical Paradise here, when you explore the great outdoors
Awesome sunsets, bountiful fiestas, the warmest smiles to greet you...
We here just love to eat when there’s nothing else to do!
Colorful rice cakes, freshest seafood, the most succulent mangoes~
Sunny days or rainy days, the creativity here just flows.
Resilient. This is a word that pops to mind when I think of us Filipinos-
We bend and bounce back, no matter how hard the wind blows.
This is just a sneak peek, but I’d love to know more about Utah
Care to share what’s on your side, my dear friend Andrea?

( 3 Way Collaboration )


Copyright © Poet Destroyer A | Year Posted 2010


Ignorance, allied with power, is the most ferocious enemy justice can have. -James Baldwin, writer
progpen
Posted: Saturday, July 08, 2017 9:49:02 AM

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Hope123 wrote:
https://www.authentichappiness.sas.upenn.edu/newsletters/authentichappinesscoaching/open-mindedness

"Open-mindedness is the willingness to search actively for evidence against one’s favored beliefs, plans, or goals, and to weigh such evidence fairly when it is available.

Being open-minded does not imply that one is indecisive, wishy-washy, or incapable of thinking for one’s self. After considering various alternatives, an open-minded person can take a firm stand on a position and act accordingly.

The opposite of open-mindedness is what is called the myside bias which refers to the pervasive tendency to search for evidence and evaluate evidence in a way that favors your initial beliefs. Most people show myside bias, but some are more biased than others."


The indecisive label comes from those whose myside bias has created such a crystal clarity and calm self assuredness that they see anyone who changes their mind on a subject to be inferior.

Our lives begin to end the day we become silent about things that matter. ― Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.
Hope123
Posted: Saturday, July 08, 2017 11:44:06 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/23/2015
Posts: 6,409
Neurons: 37,949
Location: Burlington, Ontario, Canada
I know Progpen. And it is exactly the opposite - the inability to change one's mind when one gets further data pointing in a different direction, has led to many an unfavorable conclusion.

Ignorance, allied with power, is the most ferocious enemy justice can have. -James Baldwin, writer
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