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a feast of fully cranked guitar Options
Харбин Хэйлунцзян 1
Posted: Monday, June 19, 2017 6:35:38 AM

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Longman says 'guitar' is countable:

http://www.ldoceonline.com/dictionary/guitar

Quote:
gui‧tar /ɡɪˈtɑː $ -ˈtɑːr/ noun [countable]

But then there are some examples:

Quote:
He played classical guitar, and our music class was one of the most enjoyable hours for me.
The album is an absolute feast of fully cranked guitar and catchy pop choruses.

Ok 'play guitar' is sort of 'go to church' though I was taught it should be 'play the guitar' but what about the second example?

აბა ყვავებს ვინ დაიჭერს, კარგო? გალიაში ბულბულები ზიან.
Romany
Posted: Monday, June 19, 2017 9:08:45 AM
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It's the same with all kinds of musical instruments.

He plays the saxaphone, She plays the clarinet.

They may play either classical or modern so we replace 'the' with an adjective: He plays modern saxophone, she plays classical clarinet.

However, the words, guitar, piano, clarinet, saxaphone, drums etc. can also be used to mean 'guitar etc. music/section (of the orchestra or band)."

One might say "The concert was great but that last number needed more sax." ("Saxophone" is far too long. We use the short-form 'sax')
"His new band line-up is great, but it needs more base guitar."
"I hate it when they do that song with no trumpet."
(NB - for some reason we no longer speak about a group 'playing' a number; we use the verb 'do'.e.g. "They did their latest song first at the concert".
"When they did '212' the whole audience went wild."
"The Beatles did a lot of songs that people still know to-day."
Wilmar (USA)
Posted: Monday, June 19, 2017 10:37:39 AM

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Guitar is a physical, countable object, a distinct object. Mine is standing in its case in the corner of the sitting room.
Харбин Хэйлунцзян 1
Posted: Monday, June 19, 2017 10:41:13 AM

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Romany wrote:
He plays the saxaphone, She plays the clarinet.

They may play either classical or modern so we replace 'the' with an adjective: He plays modern saxophone, she plays classical clarinet.

I do not understand this very well. An article is a determiner, an adjective is not (unless it is a demonstrative or interrogative adjective). I was taught that a countable noun needs a determiner. :(

Romany wrote:
However, the words, guitar, piano, clarinet, saxaphone, drums etc. can also be used to mean 'guitar etc. music/section (of the orchestra or band)."

One might say "The concert was great but that last number needed more sax."

I understand you and this does make sense. This meaning of the word must be uncountable just like 'music' is. Thank you.


აბა ყვავებს ვინ დაიჭერს, კარგო? გალიაში ბულბულები ზიან.
Romany
Posted: Monday, June 19, 2017 10:45:50 AM
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Well yes, they aren't the same part of speech, of course. But it's just a pattern that's employed = if one uses an adjective there one gets rid of the article. That's all.

He plays the guitar.He plays mad guitar. He plays Hendrix-style guitar. He plays screaming guitar.
Харбин Хэйлунцзян 1
Posted: Monday, June 19, 2017 10:46:37 AM

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Wilmar (USA) wrote:
Guitar is a physical, countable object, a distinct object. Mine is standing in its case in the corner of the sitting room.

I understand this. And because of being countable it must be prepended with an article. Just like in this your sentence which should read like:

A guitar is a physical, countable object, a distinct object.

აბა ყვავებს ვინ დაიჭერს, კარგო? გალიაში ბულბულები ზიან.
Харбин Хэйлунцзян 1
Posted: Monday, June 19, 2017 10:51:15 AM

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Romany wrote:
Well yes, they aren't the same part of speech, of course. But it's just a pattern that's employed = if one uses an adjective there one gets rid of the article. That's all.

He plays the guitar.He plays mad guitar. He plays Hendrix-style guitar. He plays screaming guitar.

Still don't get it. Can I get rid of it like this:

This is a cat. This is little cat. This is Siamese cat.

?

აბა ყვავებს ვინ დაიჭერს, კარგო? გალიაში ბულბულები ზიან.
NKM
Posted: Monday, June 19, 2017 2:22:57 PM

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Doesn't work that way for "cat", unless you can find a way to use a cat as a musical instrument. (Some beginning violin students sound as if they've achieved that.)



"I play piano, organ and guitar."
 In this sentence those nouns are treated as uncountable.

"I've played many different pianos, organs and guitars." Here, those are separate, individual instruments — obviously countable.

"I especially enjoy playing the piano." Here, "piano" is uncountable and the definite article is optional, unless I'm talking about a specific piano ("this/that piano").

Харбин Хэйлунцзян 1
Posted: Monday, June 19, 2017 2:43:55 PM

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NKM wrote:

"I play piano, organ and guitar."
 In this sentence those nouns are treated as uncountable.

"I especially enjoy playing the piano." Here, "piano" is uncountable and the definite article is optional, unless I'm talking about a specific piano ("this/that piano").

The strange thing is that the only dictionary I know has this kind of information doesn't say it is uncountable:

http://www.ldoceonline.com/dictionary/piano

Quote:
pi‧an‧o /piˈænəʊ $ -noʊ/ noun (plural pianos) [countable]

play the piano
learn the piano

Still thank you.

I'm going to consider it like other idiomatic expressions:

go to school
go to church
be in (the) hospital

აბა ყვავებს ვინ დაიჭერს, კარგო? გალიაში ბულბულები ზიან.
NKM
Posted: Monday, June 19, 2017 3:08:54 PM

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Certainly, you're right to think of it as one of the many idiomatic quirks of English. We use it so easily and naturally that it's hard for us to explain why we do things that way.
Romany
Posted: Tuesday, June 20, 2017 3:12:30 PM
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Nk - yep. Guess that's what one gets when one tries to impose 'rules' on an existing language!!

Харбин Хэйлунцзян 1 "Cats"? Where on earth did those frisky felines come from? Surely we were talking about music and musical instruments? )But, like NK I think some students DO sounds as though they're playing anguished *moggies!)

*For those unaware: - a "moggie" is an English word for a cats. Not used so much nowadays but still known well.
leonAzul
Posted: Tuesday, June 20, 2017 3:20:23 PM

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Romany wrote:


*For those unaware: - a "moggie" is an English word for a cats. Not used so much nowadays but still known well.


I count moggies among my favourite jellicle cats.
Dancing

"Make it go away, Mrs Whatsit," he whispered. "Make it go away. It's evil."
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