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My EXPRESSION of the day Options
FROSTY X RIME
Posted: Wednesday, October 18, 2017 8:35:42 AM

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TheParser wrote:
No. 31


Tom: Look at that guy! He's so fat. Ha, ha, ha.

Betty: I never say unkind things about people who are different from me.

Tom: I apologize.

Nancy: Hey, Betty, do you want to join me and my other friends at that new bar?

Betty: Liquor never touches my lips.

Nancy: I apologize.

Maria: Look, Betty! Here's a picture of our favorite actor in a bikini.

Betty: I never look at such vulgar photos.

Maria: I apologize.

Ralph: STOP IT, BETTY!

Betty: Stop what?

Ralph: Stop telling everyone that you are a goody two-shoes. ( = Someone who is better than others because that person always does what is right, pure, and clean.)



I like the phrase. It is always enjoyable to learn with you. Thanks, Parser.

What should be shall be-The fellowship of the ring-
FROSTY X RIME
Posted: Wednesday, October 18, 2017 8:41:20 AM

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TheParser wrote:
No. 32


Mona: Come with me to Mars tomorrow. I have an extra ticket for the spaceship.

Raul: I think I'll stay here on Earth. I've already been there once and had some unpleasant experiences with some Martians. Please do me a big favor, though.

Mona: What?

Raul: Don't tell Tommy what I told you. He would yell at me. He would scream at me. He would cry. He would accuse me of not liking Martians.

Mona: You're right. If Tommy knew why you didn't want to go to Mars, he would have another one of his hissy fits.



Good to learn. I like it a lot.

What should be shall be-The fellowship of the ring-
TheParser
Posted: Wednesday, October 18, 2017 8:51:18 AM
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Thanks a lot, Frosty.


Have a nice Hump Day (Wednesday). (We are almost over the hump. Just two more days and then -- the WEEKEND!)
TheParser
Posted: Thursday, October 19, 2017 5:33:35 AM
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No. 33

Tom is at his retirement party. He has worked at the Rainbow Ice Cream Company for 40 years.

Mona: We are all going to miss you.
Joe: You were my best buddy here.
Ruth: I think you were the most handsome guy here.
George: I'm very grateful for your helping me learn the ropes when I was a new employee.
Patricia: We're all going to miss your sense of humor.
Hank: This place will never be the same without you.

Betty: Don't be a stranger.

Tom: Don't worry, I won't. I promise to come back frequently to visit you guys.
TheParser
Posted: Friday, October 20, 2017 5:44:58 AM
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No. 34

Mona: Do you like this dress that I bought for Saturday's party?

Betty: It's beautiful.

Mona: I only had $i00 to spend. I'm afraid the other girls will spend more for their dresses.

Betty: Don't worry! You will be the star of the party.

Mona: Really?

Betty: I have attended many parties with you. You have always commanded (received) attention from everyone there. People are always impressed with how well your clothes fit, they are impressed with your great smile, and they are impressed with the confidence you show when you speak.

Mona: Are you trying to tell me that when I walk into that party on Saturday, I will own the room?

Betty: Exactly!
TheParser
Posted: Saturday, October 21, 2017 8:06:02 AM
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No. 35

Ms. Smith has just finished her first week as a high school (secondary school) teacher.

On Monday, she asked Ruth not to use her cellphone in class. Ruth ignored her.
On Tuesday, she asked Joe not to write graffiti on the walls. Joe ignored her.
On Wednesday, she reminded the class they needed her permission to leave class. Betty got up and walked out.
On Thursday, she asked Ralph not to listen to music. Ralph ignored her.
On Friday, she asked Millie to close the window. Millie ignored her.

After school on Friday, the principal (head teacher) and Ms. Smith had a conference.

Principal: Well, I hope that you have enjoyed your first week here.

Ms. Smith: I certainly have, sir.

Principal: So how did things go in your classes this week?

Ms. Smith: Everything was hunky dory!

Principal: I am so glad to hear that everything was fine.
TheParser
Posted: Sunday, October 22, 2017 5:14:40 AM
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No. 36

I have just learned a new expression. (No doubt many of you younger members and guests already know it.)


*****


A woman met a man online.

They had five dates.

She liked him very much.

She decided to tell him a secret: She had a certain disease.

He thanked her for her honesty.

Then he ghosted her.


*****

I asked "Professor Google" and learned that "to ghost someone" = to suddenly cut off contact with someone without explanation (especially in a romantic relationship).
TheParser
Posted: Monday, October 23, 2017 5:05:54 AM
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No. 37

Husband: Can I bring home a few fellow executives for dinner tomorrow?

Wife: Of course. Who(m) are you inviting this time?

Husband: I'm asking Tom, Joe, and Betty.

Wife: Betty? Oh my!

Husband: What's wrong?

Wife: Whenever she's here, she complains about the food and wine; she disturbs our pleasant dinner by raising controversial political topics; and she annoys everyone by reminding them that she has a Ph.D. and they don't.

Husband: Yes, I know that she is a real pain in the neck, but she's my superior at work, so I have to be nice to her.
TheParser
Posted: Tuesday, October 24, 2017 5:07:12 AM
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No. 38


Today's expression: game changer
Definition: Someone or something that makes a BIG change in a particular situation.


*****

In the 21st century, the Internet has destroyed American print newspapers (those newspapers that are printed on paper) and is now destroying many businesses.

a. Before the Internet, print newspapers received a lot of money from people who wanted to sell cars, to rent their apartments, to offer jobs. Now all of that is done on the Internet. Print newspapers have lost the money. (Print newspapers, however, are said to be still doing well in some countries.)

b. Before the Internet, you went to a store to buy furniture, clothes, books, etc. Now more and more Americans are buying online. Many stores are closing down, and many people are thus losing their jobs.

*****

The Internet has been, indeed, a game changer.

(One famous politician has just opined that Twitter was responsible for his electoral success.)

(And, of course, the Internet has allowed ordinary people like you and me to express our opinions. Before the Internet, people could only write letters to a print newspaper, and most letters were never printed.)

TheParser
Posted: Thursday, October 26, 2017 6:35:59 AM
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No. 39


Raul: Were you sick yesterday? I did not see you here at work.

Mona: I'm 70 years old. The manager wants me to take it easy. He has changed my work schedule to only three days a week.

Raul: Oh.

Mona: The manager also recommended that I spend more time traveling around the United States and even take some trips abroad.

Raul: Oh.

Mona: The manager told me that in 2018, our company will start using a new and super difficult computerized system. He doesn't think that I can understand the new system.

Raul: Oh my God!

Mona: What?

Raul: Wake up and smell the coffee! Don't you see what is happening? The manager is trying to tell you that it is time for you to retire.

Mona: Oh my God, you're right. I will file my retirement papers tomorrow/
TheParser
Posted: Friday, October 27, 2017 7:39:10 AM
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No. 40


The boss: I have called this meeting so that you can suggest what city we should visit next year.

Ms. Smith: I suggest that we visit Buenos Aires.

Mr. Jones: I suggest that we visit Prague.

Ms. Miller: I suggest that we visit Brussels.

The boss: Those are good choices. Personally, I was thinking of Kyoto.

Ms. Smith: Yes, sir. That would be an excellent place to visit.
Mr. Jones: An excellent choice, sir, as usual!
Ms. Miller: You have excellent judgment, sir. It's an honor to work for you.

The boss: I am so delighted that we are all on the same page. ( = We are all agreed that we should visit Kyoto.) I will tell my executive assistant (secretary) to arrange everything.
TheParser
Posted: Saturday, October 28, 2017 7:05:04 AM
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No. 41

This expression, in my opinion, is vulgar -- even in 2017.

Please do not use it in business meetings, for the people there will lose respect for you.

It basically means: I really, really, really do NOT care (about something).


*****


Raul: How about going to the movies this Saturday and stopping for some burgers and fries on the way home!

Mona: I can't this Saturday. I've been invited to Betty's birthday party.

Raul: No problem.

Mona: I know that you and Betty don't like each other, so she did not invite you. I'm so sorry.

Raul: Don't be sorry for me: I don't give a rat's ass about her birthday party!


*****

P.S. If you wish to express the idea in politer language, you could say: "I could not care less (about my not being invited)."
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Saturday, October 28, 2017 7:14:37 AM

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This expression is mostly used in British speaking hemisphere. There it's "the rat's arse".
Nevertheless, it's vulgar, and should be used only in your local pub with your good acquaintances.


In the beginning there was nothing, which exploded.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Saturday, October 28, 2017 8:06:23 PM

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JJ wrote:
should be used only in your local pub with your good acquaintances.


I wouldn't even use it then.

*********
Quote:
The boss: Those are good choices. Personally, I was thinking of Kyoto.

Ms. Smith: Yes, sir. That would be an excellent place to visit.
Mr. Jones: An excellent choice, sir, as usual!
Ms. Miller: You have excellent judgment, sir. It's an honour to work for you.

What a bunch of creeping yes-men!
I'd sack the lot of them.

Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
TheParser
Posted: Sunday, October 29, 2017 9:32:17 AM
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No. 42


Mona: I do not like our manager.

Raul: I like our manager.

Betty: Why do some people like our manager, and some people do not like our manager?

Mona: I don't know.

Raul: Me, neither.

George: Excuse me, but I couldn't help overhearing you guys. I think that I know one reason why people either like or dislike the manager.

Mona, Raul, Betty: What is it?

George: Well, you see, the manager wears his heart on his sleeve.

Mona, Raul, Betty: What in the world does that mean?

George: If the manager likes you, his emotions show that; if the manager doesn't like you, his emotions show that. He does NOT try to hide his feelings about anyone or anything.
Romany
Posted: Sunday, October 29, 2017 11:48:10 AM
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Wow! This seems to be a bit of a can o' worms! I was so shocked at Parsar's explanation, I went on a brief hunt.

Because the way I've read/seen/heard it is as a positive thing. Their good heart is obvious to all. They might as well be wearing it on their sleeve because it is THAT obvious.



And I found that, to some Americans like Parsar it could indeed indeed refer to some grumpy small-time manager who treats his staff unfairly. I'd never connect him with that expression in any way, shape or form. I'd just say he's incompetent!

(I came across a spurious reference to jousting. Based on a misunderstanding of the significance of a knight wearing a Lady's Favour on his sleeve.)

So - without referring to dictionary explanations - how many other people knew it wasn't only a good thing, but could be used negatively? Here's the meaning I attach to it: -

"To wear one's hear on one's sleeve" can indicate a rather sensitive person, who is a little naive and who is easily hurt by life's cruelties; it can mean someone's hopelessly in love with someone and doesn't hide the fact - even knowing it's hopeless or unlikely; it can also mean someone who is dedicated to certain causes and ceaselessly works/talks/advertises/etc. those causes. Or who is emotional - but in a GOOD way. Like a stereotypical "Italian Mamma".
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Sunday, October 29, 2017 3:35:43 PM

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I must admit that I have only really heard it used about 'love' of someone - someone cannot hide the fact that they are in love with _______, or do not hide the fact that they love their children or friends.

However, there are people who hate others, so I suppose it could mean that they show that hate too. However, I've never heard it used like that.

In the same way, I have never heard it used to mean someone who has certain dedications and advertises it - but that makes sense, too. I would understand it if I heard it used like that.

The Random House dictionary says "allow feelings, especially of love, to show".
The Collins and American Heritage don't specify, they just say 'feelings'.

The American Heritage Idioms shows:
wear one's heart on one's sleeve
Also, pin one's heart on one's sleeve. Openly show one's feelings, especially amorous ones.

but doesn't preclude negative feelings totally.


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Monday, October 30, 2017 6:16:34 AM

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It's fun we can discuss of the nuances of English language here, and the OP doesn't say a thing.


In the beginning there was nothing, which exploded.
Romany
Posted: Monday, October 30, 2017 7:00:00 AM
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JJ - I find it infinitely sad, actually. I'd hate to reach a stage in my life where I was no longer mad keen to learn as much as I can!About *everything*!

Drago: But does it not seem to you that the phrase loses its ability to mean something special, i.e. as an attribute, if it can just be applied in other circumstances where there are a lot of phrases that would do better? I mean,to return to our non-professional low-level Manager: - applied to someone like that why not say "He's difficult", "He's a pain in the neck", "You have to watch out for him",or more likely with many people "He isn't a Manager's arse."? Why would you want to use a phrase which is COMMONLY used positively to say something negative?

Or maybe we are just re-living the kind of confusion that must have pertained when words (like "nice" and "silly" and "sick" etc) began their journey to meaning the opposite of what they had once meant?

Romany
Posted: Monday, October 30, 2017 7:00:07 AM
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JJ - I find it infinitely sad, actually. I'd hate to reach a stage in my life where I was no longer mad keen to learn as much as I can!About *everything*!

Drago: But does it not seem to you that the phrase loses its ability to mean something special, i.e. as an attribute, if it can just be applied in other circumstances where there are a lot of phrases that would do better? I mean,to return to our non-professional low-level Manager: - applied to someone like that why not say "He's difficult", "He's a pain in the neck", "You have to watch out for him",or more likely with many people "He isn't a Manager's arse."? Why would you want to use a phrase which is COMMONLY used positively to say something negative?

Or maybe we are just re-living the kind of confusion that must have pertained when words (like "nice" and "silly" and "sick" etc) began their journey to meaning the opposite of what they had once meant?

TheParser
Posted: Tuesday, October 31, 2017 12:07:20 PM
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No. 43

It is illegal in my state for automobiles to have heavily tinted (darkened) windshields and windows.

If a car has a heavily tinted windshield and heavily tinted windows, then other drivers (and pedestrians) cannot see the driver inside that car. It can be a very dangerous safety hazard.

Yet there are many heavily tinted automobiles in my city.

As a pedestrian, I am afraid to cross the street in front of a heavily tinted car because I do not know whether the driver sees me (I cannot see the driver's face).

So why do the police turn a blind eye ( = ignore) this situation?

Because they are busy responding to more important things.

TheParser
Posted: Wednesday, November 01, 2017 7:38:25 AM
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No. 44


Mona: I'm going to visit Betty. Do you want to come with me?

Raul: No way!

Mona: Why not?

Raul: Betty has told me that her house has ghosts. I'm scared!

Mona (chuckling): Oh, Raul, you know that Betty has a vivid imagination. You should not take too seriously everything that she says.

Raul: Yeah, I guess that you're right. I should take Betty's claims of ghosts with a grain of salt.
TheParser
Posted: Thursday, November 02, 2017 8:23:46 AM
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No. 45

Mr. Smith (the owner of a large company on Jupiter): I am sending you to the United States to negotiate (discuss) an important business contract with an American company.

Mr. Jones: I will do my best, sir.

Mr. Smith: I have 100% trust in you.

Mr. Jones: Thank you, sir.

Mr. Smith: I am giving you complete authority to negotiate on my behalf. You may sign any contract that you think will be beneficial to my company.

Mr. Jones: Thank you, sir.

Mr. Smith: I ask only one thing.

Mr. Jones: What is that, sir?

Mr. Smith: I expect you to keep me in the loop.

Mr. Jones: Absolutely, sir. I will let you know every night what happened in that day's talks. Then you can make any suggestions that you may have.
philips daughter
Posted: Thursday, November 02, 2017 9:10:39 AM

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Hey Parser, I would like to hear your opinion (because it is so fair) to comment on the New York terror suspect who was an Uber driver. Does this change your opinion on Uber? Do you ever change your mind?
TheParser
Posted: Friday, November 03, 2017 7:25:18 AM
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No. 46


Mona: I really want the boss to appoint me as the new manager.

Raul: But there are 50 applicants. And, quite frankly (honestly), many of them are more qualified than you.

Mona: Don't worry, my friend. I have something up my sleeve that will help me make a big impression on the boss.

Raul: Oh, you have a secret plan that will help you impress the boss? What is it?

Mona: Sorry, I can't tell you. But I bet that you are talking to the next manager!
TheParser
Posted: Saturday, November 04, 2017 7:19:44 AM
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No. 47


Husband: I have decided to fire (dismiss) Mrs. Jones, the manager of my company.

Wife: Why?

Husband: Because she is running my business into the ground ( = destroying it).

Wife: She is such a lovely person. You will hurt her feelings if you fire her.

Husband: Yes, all of my employees do love her. She is very kind and patient. She even brings donuts every day to give to my 50 employees. But ...

Wife: Instead of firing her, why don't you kick her upstairs?

Husband: Great idea! I never thought of that.

Wife: Tomorrow you could fib (= lie) to her and say that she has been doing such a great job that you are going to "promote" her to a higher position. Then you can get a qualified person to be manager. You could create a new position for her that is less important than the position of manager.

Husband: All right! I will tell her that she is being promoted to vice president in charge of employee family relations. I will give her a nice office where she can spend the day talking with employees who have family problems.
TheParser
Posted: Sunday, November 05, 2017 5:07:11 AM
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No. 48


Mona: I have noticed that you have been super tired for the last two months. What have you been doing for the last two months?

Raul: Well, I attend the university in the morning as usual, then I have a new job in the afternoon, and then I take care of a sick neighbor at night.

Mona: Oh my God! Don't you see what the problem is?

Raul: No.

Mona: My dear friend, you are in over your head.

Raul: You are so right. It's impossible for me to do so many things. I will have to work fewer hours and get someone else to take care of my neighbor.
Romany
Posted: Sunday, November 05, 2017 5:27:12 AM
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NB -

To be "in over one's head" doesn't mean one is very busy.

It means that one is involved in something they don't understand; or that they don't realise they are in a situation that is too complex for them to understand.
coag
Posted: Sunday, November 05, 2017 12:26:01 PM

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I had learned this expression from Fleetwood Mac song "Over my Head" and I had always thought it meant what Romany said. But, I just checked the Internet, Wictionary gives a definition which agrees with TheParser's:
3 (idiomatic) More than one can handle; too much (especially in over one's head).
I’m in over my head on this project. Can you help?

I've been puzzled by this expression and I would appreciate if other native speakers comment it. What we say in Croatian-Serbian, literally translates to "over my head" and it means one thing only, "more than one can handle". This meaning seems natural to me (well, it's my mother tongue) and I wonder if it is possible that this meaning of "over my head" is questionable in English.
oruckadir
Posted: Sunday, November 05, 2017 1:05:00 PM

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Hi;
I have looked up to "Tureng” dictionary in order to understand the meaning of the expression “be in over one’s head” ; It means that;
1. To exceed one’s authority,
2. To go beyond the limit,
3. To step out of line,
4. To go too far,
5. To overstep the limit,
6. To be impertinent,
7. To overstep the mark,
8. To attempt to a job exceeding one's capacity or knowledge.



"Life's tragedy is that we get old too soon and wise too late." Benjamin FRANKLIN
TheParser
Posted: Monday, November 06, 2017 5:03:24 AM
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Many thanks to Coag and Oruckadir for their thoughtful comments.

I wish you both a nice day!
Romany
Posted: Monday, November 06, 2017 5:17:53 AM
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Hi Coag -

I went searching through non-American dictionaries and found not one of them gave "busy" or "impertinent" etc. but only gave the meaning as you and I discussed it.

So - it must be yet another AE phrase that's a False Friend? (i.e. sounds exactly the same as a word/phrase we use in our own language but which has a different meaning in another.)

It's very useful to learn these differences to keep in mind when reading American texts - either in fiction or the News.

Hope123
Posted: Monday, November 06, 2017 10:05:18 AM

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Romany wrote:
NB -

To be "in over one's head" doesn't mean one is very busy.

It means that one is involved in something they don't understand; or that they don't realise they are in a situation that is too complex for them to understand.


For what it is worth - This is what it means in my neck of the woods in Canada too. I would never use it to mean any of those listed in Oruckadir's post except number eight.

You're already in the water, it is over your head, and you are drowning as you can't swim. You are in serious trouble.

I can see how it might be adapted to mean taking on too much, but I would not use it that way.

World food shortage that threatens five hundred million children could be alleviated at the cost of one day's warfare.
almo 1
Posted: Monday, November 06, 2017 10:42:43 AM
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Raul carried many things at once which exceeded his capacity.


So Mona said, "My dear friend, you are in over your head".




tunaafi
Posted: Monday, November 06, 2017 11:55:42 AM

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almo 1 wrote:
Raul carried many things at once which exceeded his capacity.

So Mona said, "My dear friend, you are in over your head".

That is not natural in British English.
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