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(Adjective) A very nervous person Options
TheParser
Posted: Friday, May 19, 2017 8:25:57 AM
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NOT A TEACHER

Dear Fellow Learners:


In the family, at school, at work, etc., you may meet some very nervous people, so I think that you should know this adjective.


*****


Mona (manager): My secretary, Joe, has been coming late to work every morning. I plan to admonish him ( = tell him not to do that).

Raul (assistant manager): If you do admonish him, do it in a very gentle manner.

Mona: Why?

Raul: Joe is a very nervous person. It's easy to upset him. Other employees are afraid to speak to him because they are afraid that just one wrong word will anger him.

Mona: That reminds me. Two weeks ago, I told him that he had make one spelling mistake. He started to cry.

Raul: Yes, Joe is very high-strung.

Mona: I have decided not to admonish him. I will ignore his tardiness. I don't want any trouble with him.

Raul: Wise decision.



P.S. In some varieties of English, they seem to prefer "highly strung."




I wish all of you a great weekend!
NKM
Posted: Friday, May 19, 2017 11:32:05 AM

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Joe is definitely not laid back.

towan52
Posted: Friday, May 19, 2017 12:02:08 PM

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What a Wuss!

"Be careful about reading health books. You may die of a misprint."
Romany
Posted: Friday, May 19, 2017 12:41:07 PM
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Just one thing: Unlike AE, we still use adverbs to describe verbs.

So, to us, 'He is very high-strung' would be considered incorrect and would sound totally 'wrong'.

We use 'highly strung'.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Friday, May 19, 2017 12:50:27 PM

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I think that either "high-strung" (with a hyphen) or "highly strung" (no hyphen) work fine.
They would be 'parsed' differently, but seem equivalent.

I agree with Towan.

Joe's either a wimpy, namby-pamby cry-baby OR he's someone who has learned to get away with lateness and errors by making everyone afraid to upset him.

Obnoxious, whichever way it is.

***********
Cross-posted with Romany.
We do have different styles of speaking.
Probably, she knows the correct grammar better than what I do. Whistle

(Learners, ignore that last sentence, it is not correct grammar.)


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
tunaafi
Posted: Friday, May 19, 2017 1:02:13 PM

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TheParser wrote:

Raul: Joe is a very nervous person. It's easy to upset him. Other employees are afraid to speak to him because they are afraid that just one wrong word will anger him.


I would not use 'nervous' of a person who is easily upset or who gets angry quickly.
Romany
Posted: Friday, May 19, 2017 1:17:54 PM
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Drago - oddly enough, when you said that about speaking differently something clanged in my memory.

Many Irish-speakers would say something like "She's a beautiful high-strung filly". And it seems it's non uncommon in Scotland - so perhaps it's a Celtic/Gaelic construction?

Which of course would be reason enough for the English to declare that usage 'wrong'!

Edited to add: Tuna, having read back, I'm in agreement with you. Everyone from the nuns onward tell me I'm 'highly strung'. But neither they, nor I, would ever describe myself as "nervous" or of "getting angry".



Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Friday, May 19, 2017 1:46:24 PM

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I found "high-strung" as an idiomatic adjective in most American dictionaries and in the Cambridge (but not in the UK edition of the Oxenford).



Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
TheParser
Posted: Friday, May 19, 2017 5:18:23 PM
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Thanks, NKM, Towan, and DragOnspeaker, for your interesting (and amusing) comments.


Have a great weekend!

tunaafi
Posted: Friday, May 19, 2017 5:44:59 PM

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Location: Karlín, Praha, Czech Republic
And no thanks to tunaafi or Romany. Their posts were apparently neither amusing nor interesting.
NKM
Posted: Friday, May 19, 2017 10:09:14 PM

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Location: Corinth, New York, United States
Rather, I think, merely unread.

(Bit of selective blindness, one may suppose.)

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