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The cat keeps us happy. Options
Maggie Q
Posted: Thursday, May 18, 2017 10:01:50 PM
Rank: Member

Joined: 5/15/2017
Posts: 52
Neurons: 598
The cat keeps us happy.

Question 1 / 1: In this case, 'happy' functions as the complement of the object 'us', right?

Question 1 / 2: In this case, can I also take 'happy' as the complement of the pronoun 'us'?


Is there something important?

Question 2: In this case, 'important' functions as the complement of the pronoun 'something', right?


We will take him to the hospital in the helicopter.

Question 3: In this case, the adverb phrase 'in the helicopter' functions as an adverb of manner, right?

Question 4: In this case, can I also take 'in the helicopter' as an adjunct?


He is in the garden.

Question 5: In this case, does the adverbial phrase 'in the garden' function as an adverb of place OR a subject complement? Why?

The box with a strange symbol on it was mine.

Question 6 / 1: In this case, the adjective phrase 'with a strange symbol on it' functions as the complement of the noun 'box', right?

Question 6 / 2: In this case, the adjective phrase 'with a strange symbol on it' functions as a post-modifier modifying the noun 'box', right?

Question 6 / 3: In this case, 'on it' functions as the complement of the noun 'symbol' instead of an adjunct, right?
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Friday, May 19, 2017 7:41:11 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 26,248
Neurons: 140,064
Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
Hi!

I believe that 'happy' is the object complement in that sentence.

A complement is something which completes something.
It is the sentence which needs to be completed - so it is a complement of the sentence.
"The cat keeps us . . ." is not complete.

I would not say that it is the complement of the pronoun - because the pronoun 'us' is complete.
It is the sentence which does not sound complete without that phrase.

*************
I don't see "important" as a complement here.
I simply see it as an adjective qualifying 'something'.
"Is there something?" is a complete sentence, so doesn't need a complement.

*********
Well, you could look at 'in the helicopter' as an adverbial of place or manner, I suppose.

In my mind, it is more really an adverbial of manner - it means "by helicopter".

It is an adjunct, because it can be removed without spoiling the integrity of the sentence.
We will take him to the hospital.

**************
"He is" needs either a noun-phrase or an adjectival phrase to complete it.

"He is a singer" (noun phrase)
"She is a famous post-impressionist painter" (noun phrase)
"He is famous" (adjective)
"She is fabulously rich" (adjectival phrase)

"In the garden" describes him, his state of being.

I see it as an adjectival phrase.

****************
I don't see it as a complement.

The box was mine is a perfectly good sentence.
"with a strange symbol on it" is just an adjectival phrase, adding data.

It does not 'complete the meaning'.

Quote:
In this case, the adjective phrase 'with a strange symbol on it' functions as a post-modifier modifying the noun 'box'
Well, you could say all that if you really want to. It makes sense.

"On it" performs absolutely no function at all - it definitely does not complete the sentence. It cannot be a complement.

"The box with a strange symbol was mine" is a good sentence, and says the same as your original sentence.
I would say that it is an adjunct - because it is not essential to the meaning.


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Maggie Q
Posted: Friday, May 19, 2017 7:10:05 PM
Rank: Member

Joined: 5/15/2017
Posts: 52
Neurons: 598
Drag0nspeaker wrote:
Hi!

I believe that 'happy' is the object complement in that sentence.

A complement is something which completes something.
It is the sentence which needs to be completed - so it is a complement of the sentence.
"The cat keeps us . . ." is not complete.

I would not say that it is the complement of the pronoun - because the pronoun 'us' is complete.
It is the sentence which does not sound complete without that phrase.

*************
I don't see "important" as a complement here.
I simply see it as an adjective qualifying 'something'.
"Is there something?" is a complete sentence, so doesn't need a complement.

*********
Well, you could look at 'in the helicopter' as an adverbial of place or manner, I suppose.

In my mind, it is more really an adverbial of manner - it means "by helicopter".

It is an adjunct, because it can be removed without spoiling the integrity of the sentence.
We will take him to the hospital.

**************
"He is" needs either a noun-phrase or an adjectival phrase to complete it.

"He is a singer" (noun phrase)
"She is a famous post-impressionist painter" (noun phrase)
"He is famous" (adjective)
"She is fabulously rich" (adjectival phrase)

"In the garden" describes him, his state of being.

I see it as an adjectival phrase.

****************
I don't see it as a complement.

The box was mine is a perfectly good sentence.
"with a strange symbol on it" is just an adjectival phrase, adding data.

It does not 'complete the meaning'.

Quote:
In this case, the adjective phrase 'with a strange symbol on it' functions as a post-modifier modifying the noun 'box'
Well, you could say all that if you really want to. It makes sense.

"On it" performs absolutely no function at all - it definitely does not complete the sentence. It cannot be a complement.

"The box with a strange symbol was mine" is a good sentence, and says the same as your original sentence.
I would say that it is an adjunct - because it is not essential to the meaning.



Thank you so much

We will take him to the hospital in the helicopter.

Question 1: In this case, the adverbial phrase 'to the hospital' functions as an adverbial complement completing the meaning of the verb 'take', right?


He is in the garden.

Question 2 / 1: You mean, in this case, 'in the garden' is the complement of subject?

Question 2 / 2: Can I take it as an adverb of place? ( -Where is he? -In the garden. ) If not, why?


I saw him begin to cry.

Question 3 / 1: In this case, the infinitive 'to cry' is the complement of the infinitive '( to ) begin', right?

Question 3 / 2: In this case, does 'to cry' mean that he intended to cry but didn't cry yet?


He was the first one OUT.

Question 4 / 1: In this case, the adverb 'out' is the complement of the pronoun 'one,' right?

Question 4 / 2: In this case, is 'one' a noun or a pronoun?

Question 4 / 3: What kind of 'adverbial' does 'out' function as in this case? (adverbial of place? something like that)

Question 4 / 4: Does this Q & A make sense to native speakers?

-Where was he the first one to get?

-He was the first one to get out / He was the first one OUT.

If not, could you tell me how to make a question of it?
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Saturday, May 20, 2017 9:39:45 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 26,248
Neurons: 140,064
Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
I'm not sure that I can answer all your questions here.
These subjects were not taught when I learned grammar - not in such fine detail anyway.
Are you sure you NEED to know all the different possible names for each phrase in a sentence?
Do you not understand the sentences?

Q1. We will take him to the hospital in the helicopter.
It is an adverbial phrase of direction/space. It qualifies 'take'.
According to this page, it is an adverbial complement.

Q2. He is in the garden.
Again - the same page.

It is the subject complement and is acting as an adjective.
Quote:
When a prepositional phrase follows a linking verb (especially the verb be), it functions in the same way as a predicative adjective to describe the subject. For example:

“The cat is in the shed.” (The prepositional phrase in the shed is describing the subject the cat.)
“I am across the street.” (The prepositional phrase across the street is describing the subject I.)


Q3. I saw him begin to cry.
3-1. "to cry" is definitely acting as an adverbial, qualifying 'begin'.
I think you could call it an adverbial complement.
(same page, under the heading "Infinitives and infinitive phrases")
3-2. "to cry" does not say that he had not been crying before. "Begin" is what tells you that.

4. He was the first one OUT.
What this means depends on context.
Is it people leaving a building?
Is it a cricket team?
Did they go on strike?
Did several people faint?

4-1. I believe that (because the main verb is a copula 'was'):
The subject complement is the noun-phrase 'the first one'.
"Out" seems to be acting as an adverbial complement.

4-2. It seems more like a noun to me.
one n
13. a single person or thing: one at a time.


4-3. They are moving from one place to another or one state to another. If it's changing place, then it's in that direction.
If they are changing state, then it would be more like an adverbial of manner.
Quote:
"Adverbial complements usually describe location or direction, and most frequently occur with verbs that indicate motion."


4-4. If you want a question which would receive the answer "He was the first one out", then I can only think of a very complex and unnatural-sounding one. Most questions do not require a full sentence like that as the answer. You want two pieces of data - where was he in the sequence? (first) and where did he move? (out)
In the sequence of people moving, what position did he hold and to where did he move?
"He was the first to come out."

If you asked your example question, you would not receive such a full answer:
-Where was he the first one to get?
"Out."

Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Maggie Q
Posted: Saturday, May 20, 2017 11:33:19 PM
Rank: Member

Joined: 5/15/2017
Posts: 52
Neurons: 598
Drag0nspeaker wrote:
I'm not sure that I can answer all your questions here.
These subjects were not taught when I learned grammar - not in such fine detail anyway.
Are you sure you NEED to know all the different possible names for each phrase in a sentence?
Do you not understand the sentences?

Q1. We will take him to the hospital in the helicopter.
It is an adverbial phrase of direction/space. It qualifies 'take'.
According to this page, it is an adverbial complement.

Q2. He is in the garden.
Again - the same page.

It is the subject complement and is acting as an adjective.
Quote:
When a prepositional phrase follows a linking verb (especially the verb be), it functions in the same way as a predicative adjective to describe the subject. For example:

“The cat is in the shed.” (The prepositional phrase in the shed is describing the subject the cat.)
“I am across the street.” (The prepositional phrase across the street is describing the subject I.)


Q3. I saw him begin to cry.
3-1. "to cry" is definitely acting as an adverbial, qualifying 'begin'.
I think you could call it an adverbial complement.
(same page, under the heading "Infinitives and infinitive phrases")
3-2. "to cry" does not say that he had not been crying before. "Begin" is what tells you that.

4. He was the first one OUT.
What this means depends on context.
Is it people leaving a building?
Is it a cricket team?
Did they go on strike?
Did several people faint?

4-1. I believe that (because the main verb is a copula 'was'):
The subject complement is the noun-phrase 'the first one'.
"Out" seems to be acting as an adverbial complement.

4-2. It seems more like a noun to me.
one n
13. a single person or thing: one at a time.


4-3. They are moving from one place to another or one state to another. If it's changing place, then it's in that direction.
If they are changing state, then it would be more like an adverbial of manner.
Quote:
"Adverbial complements usually describe location or direction, and most frequently occur with verbs that indicate motion."


4-4. If you want a question which would receive the answer "He was the first one out", then I can only think of a very complex and unnatural-sounding one. Most questions do not require a full sentence like that as the answer. You want two pieces of data - where was he in the sequence? (first) and where did he move? (out)
In the sequence of people moving, what position did he hold and to where did he move?
"He was the first to come out."

If you asked your example question, you would not receive such a full answer:
-Where was he the first one to get?
"Out."


Thank you so much :)

Your explanations make sense to me. Thank you :)
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