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Is "on" correct or "for"? Options
Koh Elaine
Posted: Thursday, May 18, 2017 6:23:06 AM
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Goh Lee Ting was facing nine charges of theft and fraudulent possessions. A pre-trial conference had been set on Tuesday.

Is "on" correct or "for"?

Thanks.
NancyUK
Posted: Thursday, May 18, 2017 8:55:08 AM

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Hi Koh Elaine

It seems to me that for is preferable:

A pre-trial conference had been set for Tuesday.

If you use on, that could mean that the pre-trial conference was arranged on Tuesday, to occur on some other day.

A pre-trial conference had been set on Tuesday, to take place the following week.

Having said all that, neither is incorrect in my opinion.

Edited: to add colour.

I would live all my life in nonchalance and insouciance, Were it not for making a living, which is rather a nouciance. Ogden Nash
Erhnice
Posted: Thursday, May 18, 2017 9:33:32 AM
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That is a tricky question, which seems quite simple. Here's my interpretation: (1) "...conference had been set for Tuesday" = ... conference had been SCHEDULED for Tuesday; (2) if the pre-trial conference is to TAKE PLACE sometime, say, Tuesday, the preposition is "on" and the verb cannot be "to set": "A pre-trial conference WILL BE on Tuesday (or "WILL TAKE PLACE on Tuesday"). As far as the context above (i.e. someone is facing charges, and a pre-trial had been set), the preposition is FOR. Although grammatically both prepositions make sense, in the context above "ON" is incorrect because it does not make sense to refer to the day the pre-trial conference had been set. The relevant information is the day it will take place.
Koh Elaine
Posted: Thursday, May 18, 2017 10:29:30 AM
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Thanks to both of you.
sureshot
Posted: Thursday, May 18, 2017 12:33:19 PM
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Koh Elaine wrote:
Goh Lee Ting was facing nine charges of theft and fraudulent possessions. A pre-trial conference had been set on Tuesday.

Is "on" correct or "for"?

Thanks.

_________________________

Slightly late in providing some useful information!

Extract from Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

4. crime [countable] an official statement made by the police saying that they believe someone may be guilty of a crime

- The following morning, he was arrested on a charge of burglary.
- Higgins is facing a charge of armed robbery. (a charge of burglary/theft/fraud etc)

be in charge of [verb phrase] to be the person who controls something and is responsible for it

- Who's in charge of the club's finances?

- The UN officer is in charge of coordinating all refugee programs in the region.

- The agency in charge of enforcing Mexico's gun laws declined requests for an interview.

We use "for" in sentences such as:

- There's an admission charge for adults, but children get into the museum free. (admission charge = the amount of money you must pay to go into a public place)
- There is no charge for telephoning the operator. charge = the amount of money that you pay for a service, or for being allowed to use something)

After reading these inputs, I would prefer to retain "of" in the expression " nine charges of theft and fraudulent possessions". Here, "charge(s)" is a noun.

NKM
Posted: Thursday, May 18, 2017 6:33:02 PM

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Correct on all counts!

"Charges of theft …" and "conference … set for Tuesday".

Koh Elaine
Posted: Friday, May 19, 2017 11:06:18 AM
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Thanks, sureshot.

Goh Lee Ting was facing nine charges of theft and fraudulent possessions. A pre-trial conference had been set on Tuesday.

Is "on" correct or should it be "for"?

My question is whether it is set on or set for?
Koh Elaine
Posted: Friday, May 19, 2017 11:06:40 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/4/2012
Posts: 2,146
Neurons: 8,806
NKM wrote:
Correct on all counts!

"Charges of theft …" and "conference … set for Tuesday".



Thanks, NKM.
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