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reposing myself for the night Options
vkhu
Posted: Wednesday, May 17, 2017 12:31:01 PM
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Quote:
Encouraged by this observation, I resolved the next morning to set out with the first of the tide; and reposing myself for the night in my canoe, under the watch-coat I mentioned, I launched out.

-Robinson Crusoe


Here Robinson is rowing out to a shipwreck. What I don't get is the time frame. He planned on sailing out the next morning, didn't he? Then why did that night, after putting on a coat to go to sleep, he launch his ship? How could a sleeping man even do that!?
Харбин Хэйлунцзян 1
Posted: Wednesday, May 17, 2017 4:52:07 PM

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vkhu wrote:
Quote:
Encouraged by this observation, I resolved the next morning to set out with the first of the tide; and reposing myself for the night in my canoe, under the watch-coat I mentioned, I launched out.

Here Robinson is rowing out to a shipwreck. What I don't get is the time frame. He planned on sailing out the next morning, didn't he? Then why did that night, after putting on a coat to go to sleep, he launch his ship? How could a sleeping man even do that!?

I think we have to understand that he had slept the night in the canoe before launching out in the morning. I haven't heard anyone use the present participle this way but this book was written in 1719.

აბა ყვავებს ვინ დაიჭერს, კარგო? გალიაში ბულბულები ზიან.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Friday, May 19, 2017 11:02:25 AM

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Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
Hello vkhu!

Well, this time you have completely 'stumped' me. I have no idea.

You are right that what it says to me is this:

Last night he resolved to set out this morning.
Last night, he lay down in the canoe under the coat.
At the same time, this morning, he launched his boat.


It really does not make time-sense.

A participle phrase like that is generally used to mean either "because . . ." (because I had reposed myself for the night) or "at the same time as", "while" (while I reposed myself for the night).
It cannot mean either of those, so it doesn't make sense to me.

I've just re-read the chapter in two different editions, and they say the same.

The only thing I can see is, as Харбин guessed, the sequence must be:
1. Last night he decided to set out this morning
2. Then, last night, he settled in the canoe under the coat and slept
3. Then - early this morning - he set out to the wreck.

I would have used the perfect form for the 'sleeping' section and probably split the sentence.
Encouraged by this observation, I resolved the next morning to set out with the first of the tide. Having reposed myself for the night in my canoe, under the watch-coat I mentioned, I launched out.


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Romany
Posted: Friday, May 19, 2017 12:50:35 PM
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Try this:-

Next morning, encouraged by this observation, I resolved to be ready to leave with the 1st tide. (I had woken earlier than that.) So, because I'd had a good night's sleep under my coat in the canoe, I was alert and ready to launch out on that tide.

Does that make it any clearer?
tunaafi
Posted: Friday, May 19, 2017 12:57:00 PM

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Location: Karlín, Praha, Czech Republic
Yes, but that's not the message a modern reader receives from the original sentence.
Romany
Posted: Friday, May 19, 2017 1:32:38 PM
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Joined: 6/14/2009
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Location: Brighton, England, United Kingdom

Well no, perhaps not.

However I was attempting to clarify it not just for vkhu, but also for Drago. He had declared himself stumped for the moment, so I was putting it in a way Drago would get.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Friday, May 19, 2017 1:37:18 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 26,414
Neurons: 141,722
Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
Romany wrote:
Next morning, encouraged by this observation, I resolved to be ready to leave with the 1st tide. (I had woken earlier than that.) So, because I'd had a good night's sleep under my coat in the canoe, I was alert and ready to launch out on that tide.
Does that make it any clearer?

That's a very clear description of the message I guessed the author was communicating - I had the time of decision/resolution different (with 'the next morning' connected to 'set out' rather than 'resolved') but it could be either.

The main trouble I have is the tense in the second sentence, I suppose.

That present participle - disposing - seems to set "start of sleep, getting under the coat" as the temporal point of view (which is why I chose that as the time of 'resolved').

With no perfectives in the sentence, the actions all occur at the same time.
- the resolution to set out early
- the reposing himself in the canoe
- the reposing himself under the coat
- the launching out

Your sentence puts in the perfect, as mine did:
Quote:
I'd had a good night's sleep


My mental picture gets all Ⓣшiƨtәb with the original sentence.


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
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