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The house lay low to the ground. Options
Maggie Q
Posted: Tuesday, May 16, 2017 8:42:33 PM
Rank: Member

Joined: 5/15/2017
Posts: 72
Neurons: 953
The house lay low to the ground.

Question 1: What's the meaning of this sentence?

Question 2: The house lay low to the ground. == The house break down to the ground ?

Question 3: In this case, is 'lie low' a verb phrase or a phrasal verb?
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Tuesday, May 16, 2017 9:58:56 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 26,731
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Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
As the answers you got in 'italki' and 'wordreference.com' say, normally, it is not a sentence you would normally see - it is part of a description intended to give a 'picture' or the house.

"The house lay low to the ground with a corrugated tin panel jutting over the doorway. Potted succulents and cactuses covered the cracked concrete and walls."

It was a very low house - probably just one floor.

It is literary, metaphorical.
Imagine a dog which normally stands on its four legs - an ordinary house.
Then a dog lying, close to the ground - the house lay low to the ground.


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Evergreen
Posted: Thursday, May 18, 2017 8:11:45 AM
Rank: Newbie

Joined: 10/28/2010
Posts: 31
Neurons: 1,469
Hello !

It may be a phrase of the play with come-on consonants addings and further possible moldings.
For example :

De/ The house sley glowed to the land. And . . .


Ce/ The chorus flew to the blue

The next one is to ask "what might it mean :

Be/ The chorus blue sought for a few (around) ?

The answer is the first question :
A - hey !/ The house lay low to the ground
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