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Daemon
Posted: Tuesday, May 16, 2017 12:00:00 AM
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fulsome

(adjective) Unpleasantly and excessively suave or ingratiating in manner or speech.

Synonyms: unctuous, buttery, oleaginous, smarmy, oily

Usage: His introduction contained such fulsome flattery that I began to wonder whether anything else he said could be trusted.
KSPavan
Posted: Tuesday, May 16, 2017 3:29:04 AM

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Word of the Day
fulsome
Definition: (adjective) Unpleasantly and excessively suave or ingratiating in manner or speech.
Synonyms: unctuous, buttery, oleaginous, smarmy, oily
Usage: His introduction contained such fulsome flattery that I began to wonder whether anything else he said could be trusted.
monamagda
Posted: Tuesday, May 16, 2017 12:08:03 PM

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Irma Crespo
Posted: Tuesday, May 16, 2017 7:37:49 PM

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Adj. 1. fulsome - unpleasantly and excessively suave or ingratiating in manner or speech; "buttery praise"; "gave him a fulsome introduction"; "an oily sycophantic press agent"; "oleaginous hypocrisy"; "smarmy self-importance"; "the unctuous Uriah Heep"; "soapy compliments"
buttery, oleaginous, smarmy, unctuous, soapy, oily
insincere - lacking sincerity; "a charming but thoroughly insincere woman"; "their praise was extravagant and insincere"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
TheParser
Posted: Monday, July 10, 2017 8:45:59 AM
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Caution, advanced learners.

"Fulsome" does NOT mean "abundant" or "enthusiastic."

Sometimes native speakers will make the mistake of saying something like:

"I wish to express fulsome praise for Mr. Smith's 40 years here at this company."
thar
Posted: Monday, July 10, 2017 12:12:41 PM

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Actually this is one of those words that switched sides, like 'nice'.

It can mean 'abundant, full. Sometimes. Whistle


Although you rarely hear it except in relation to praise.


Quote:
fulsome (adj.)
mid-13c., "abundant, plentiful," Middle English compound of ful "full" (see full (adj.)) + -som "to a considerable degree" (see -some (1)). Perhaps a case of ironic understatement. Sense extended to "plump, well-fed" (mid-14c.), then "arousing disgust" (similar to the feeling of having over-eaten), late 14c. Via the sense of "causing nausea" it came to be used of language, "offensive to taste or good manners" (early 15c.); especially "excessively flattering" (1660s). Since the 1960s, however, it commonly has been used in its original, favorable sense, especially in fulsome praise. Related: Fulsomely; fulsomeness.



Quote:
Etymology
From Middle English fulsum, equivalent to full +‎ -some. The meaning has evolved from an original positive connotation "abundant" to a neutral "plump" to a negative "overfed". In modern usage, it can take on any of these inflections. See usage note.

Offensive to good taste, tactless, overzealous, excessive.
1726, Jonathan Swift, Gulliver's Travels, Part IV, Chapter VIII
I immediately stripped myself stark naked, and went down softly into the stream. It happened that a young female YAHOO, standing behind a bank, saw the whole proceeding, and inflamed by desire . . . embraced me after a most fulsome manner.

1820, Sir Walter Scott, chapter 35, in The Monastery:
You will hear the advanced enfans perdus, as the French call them, and so they are indeed, namely, children of the fall, singing unclean and fulsome ballads of sin and harlotrie.

Excessively flattering (connoting insincerity).
1889, Mark Twain, chapter 34, in A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court:
And by hideous contrast, a redundant orator was making a speech to another gathering not thirty steps away, in fulsome laudation of "our glorious British liberties!"

1922, James Joyce, Ulysses, Episode 15—Circe:
Mrs. Bellingham: He addressed me in several handwritings with fulsome compliments as a Venus in furs.

Marked by fullness; abundant; copious.
The fulsome thanks of the war-torn nation lifted our weary spirits.

Fully developed, mature.
Her fulsome timbre resonated throughout the hall.

Usage notes
Common usage tends toward the negative connotation, and using fulsome in the sense of abundant, copious, or mature may lead to confusion without contextual prompts.
Synonyms
(offensive): gross
(abundant, copious): profuse
(excessively flattering): effusive, unctuous


Irma Crespo
Posted: Tuesday, July 11, 2017 2:00:42 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 12/24/2014
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Location: Panamá, Panama, Panama
Adj. 1. fulsome - unpleasantly and excessively suave or ingratiating in manner or speech; "buttery praise"; "gave him a fulsome introduction"; "an oily sycophantic press agent"; "oleaginous hypocrisy"; "smarmy self-importance"; "the unctuous Uriah Heep"; "soapy compliments"
buttery, oleaginous, smarmy, unctuous, soapy, oily
insincere - lacking sincerity; "a charming but thoroughly insincere woman"; "their praise was extravagant and insincere"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
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