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Into and in to. Options
Ashwin Joshi
Posted: Sunday, May 14, 2017 12:06:31 PM

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I tried my best to learn the difference between two words i.e. into and in to, but not with success. Teachers please explain the difference.

Me Gathering Pebbles at The Seashore.-Aj
You know who I am
Posted: Sunday, May 14, 2017 12:38:07 PM

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Ashwin Joshi wrote:
I tried my best to learn the difference between two words i.e. into and in to, but not with success. Teachers please explain the difference.


Hello, Aswhin.

"Into" is simply the junction of "In" + "To", which impplies direction towards a place which uses the preposition In.

For example: I am IN a box; it means that I am inside the box, not on the surface but inside it.
Now check the differences between "In" and "Into": if I say something like: I will throw this ball in the box. What does that mean for you? Does it mean that I will throw the ball towards the box and inside it? If you think so, that's wrong. "Throw" is a verb of movement, so I need to use an adverb of direction; "In" isn't a directional adverb, instead, it is a locative adverb. "Into" performs that role since it is a directional adverb: I will throw this ball into the box - it means that I will throw the ball towards the box which will fall inside it.

I will throw the ball in the box - It means that I am in the box and will throw the ball, the direction which the ball will go towards hasn't been implied since no directional adverb was mentioned, only a locative (In).

I will throw the ball into the box - It means that I will throw the ball towards the box and it will fall inside it.

Other examples
:

I will walk into the house - It means that I am out of the house and will walk towards its inside
I will walk in the house - It means that I will walk inside the house, I am already IN, and I am walking inside it already.

I am the way, and the truth and the life, no one comes to the Father except through Me. - John 14:6
tunaafi
Posted: Sunday, May 14, 2017 1:11:13 PM

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You know who I am wrote:


I will throw the ball in the box - It means that I am in the box and will throw the ball, the direction which the ball will go towards hasn't been implied since no directional adverb was mentioned, only a locative

That's OK in theory, but most native speakers would understand that sentence to mean the same as a sentence with 'into'. Common sense prevails over cold logic.

I concede that learners are safer to use 'into' when direction is involved, but they will hear/see 'in' used in BrE when the purist would use 'into'.






tunaafi
Posted: Sunday, May 14, 2017 1:24:03 PM

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Note also 'into' does not necessarily have a directional sense with some multi-word verbs:

He was quite a thug as a teenager, but the birth of his daughter turned him into a responsible citizen
.(It changed him. 'In' is not possible.)
When the terrorist cheated on his girlfriend, she turned him in to the police.(She told the police where he could be found.)
You know who I am
Posted: Sunday, May 14, 2017 1:46:48 PM

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tunaafi wrote:
Note also 'into' does not necessarily have a directional sense with some multi-word verbs:

He was quite a thug as a teenager, but the birth of his daughter turned him into a responsible citizen
.(It changed him. 'In' is not possible.)
When the terrorist cheated on his girlfriend, she turned him in to the police.(She told the police where he could be found.)


Hello, tunaafi.

In that case, "Into" isn't a preposition acting adverbialy, instead, it belongs to the ditransitive prepositional verb:

Turn... Into...







I am the way, and the truth and the life, no one comes to the Father except through Me. - John 14:6
sureshot
Posted: Sunday, May 14, 2017 2:02:52 PM
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As already mentioned in the earlier posts, the word “into” (one-word form) is a preposition that expresses movement of something toward or into something else. Here are a few examples:

- She thrust her hand into her coat pocket.
- Jacob rushed into the living-room and sat down on the sofa.
- Pour half a litre of milk into a pan and warm it gently.
- There must be another way into the cave.
- Saira got back into bed and pulled the quilt over her head.

In to,” are in fact two separate words because they’re fulfilling different functions. "In" is an adverb and the next word "to" is a preposition. The two words "in" and "to" perform different grammatical functions and aren’t really related. They only happen to fall next to each other based on sentence construction. Here are a few examples:

- Mom called us in to dinner. ("in" is an adverb and the next word "to" is a preposition)
- He finally gave/caved in to her demands (phrasal verb "cave in". It is followed by the preposition "to")
- I just dropped in to see how you were.("drop in" is a phrasal verb and "to see" is an infinitive verb form)
- The whole neighbourhood pitched in to clean the roads. (phrasal verb pitch in, infinitive "to clean")
- The Prime Minister stepped in to resolve the crisis. ("step in" is a phrasal verb and "to resolve" is an infinitive verb form)
- I came in to have a cup of tea with you. (adverb in, infinitive "to have")
- The detective listened in to their phone call.("listen in" is a phrasal verb and "to" is a preposition before the noun phrase "our phone call")








tunaafi
Posted: Sunday, May 14, 2017 3:56:32 PM

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You know who I am wrote:


In that case, "Into" isn't a preposition acting adverbialy, instead, it belongs to the ditransitive prepositional verb:

Turn... Into...

That depends on which school of grammar you follow.
TheParser
Posted: Sunday, May 14, 2017 6:01:23 PM
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NOT A TEACHER

One expert gives us this TRICK:

IF you can drop the "in" without losing the meaning of the sentence, then you should use in to.

1. "Bring the guests in to me."

a. If we drop "in," we get "Bring the guests to me." That keeps the meaning of the sentence. Thus, use the two words "in to."

2. "We will all go in to dinner."

a. If we drop "in," we get "We will all go to dinner." That keeps the meaning of the sentence. Thus, use the two words "in to."

*****

BE CAREFUL: This expert tells us that we would NOT go into dinner unless we all jumped into the bowl of soup!



Credit: Patricia T. O'Conner, Woe Is I (1996 edition)
TheParser
Posted: Thursday, May 18, 2017 8:05:19 AM
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I read this sentence just two hours ago:

"On Wednesday morning, Chase ... flew in to London for an urgent meeting with James and Rupert."

Let's use Ms. O'Conner's trick and delete the "in." We get "Chase flew to London." That makes sense. Thus, the two words ("in to") should be used.



Credit: Nick Davies, Hack Attack (2014).
Ashwin Joshi
Posted: Thursday, May 18, 2017 1:30:34 PM

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Location: Jandiāla Guru, Punjab, India
If" We get "Chase flew to London." That makes sense. Thus, the two words ("in to") should be used.

Why to words (in to) should be used, sir?

Me Gathering Pebbles at The Seashore.-Aj
TheParser
Posted: Friday, May 19, 2017 7:54:26 AM
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Ashwin Joshi wrote:


Why two words (in to) should be used?



NOT A TEACHER


I am guessing that if one said that "Chase flew into London," that would mean that he crashed into London. Of course, that would not be the meaning intended.

I assume that "fly in" is a phrasal verb.

Mona: I'm coming to London.

Raul: That's great. When will you be flying in? ( = arriving by plane)

Mona: On Saturday.

Raul: I'll meet you at the airport.


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