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Make things clear vs clearer Options
Jigneshbharati
Posted: Sunday, May 14, 2017 1:57:24 AM
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Joined: 11/3/2016
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Figurative language is language which uses figures of speech. This is when the writer describes things through the use of unusual comparisons, for effect, interest, to make things clearer. The result of using this technique is the creation of interesting images.
The main figures of speech are:
http://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/standard/english/close_reading_texts/appreciating_writer/revision/2/

I know that "clearer" is a comparative form(an adjective) of "clear" but always find it difficult to understand the comparisions without "than"?
Thanks
sureshot
Posted: Sunday, May 14, 2017 5:38:57 AM
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Joined: 9/16/2015
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Jigneshbharati wrote:
Figurative language is language which uses figures of speech. This is when the writer describes things through the use of unusual comparisons, for effect, interest, to make things clearer. The result of using this technique is the creation of interesting images.
The main figures of speech are:
http://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/standard/english/close_reading_texts/appreciating_writer/revision/2/

I know that "clearer" is a comparative form(an adjective) of "clear" but always find it difficult to understand the comparisions without "than"?
Thanks

__________________

If anything is ill-defined or is unclear, and an attempt is made to remove the haziness and indistinctness one can say "to make things clear". However, is anything is already understandable or comprehensible and an attempt is made to make the point more explicit and lucid than before, one can say "to make things clearer" (= to make things more clear) . The choice of word will depend on the text.

thar
Posted: Sunday, May 14, 2017 5:50:20 AM

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Joined: 7/8/2010
Posts: 15,294
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There is a baseline you are comparing this method to.


The writer describes this through the use of figures of speech, and unusual comparisons.

That is more interesting or clearer than if you didn't use figures of speech.


Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Sunday, May 14, 2017 9:37:20 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
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Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
Yes (those answers are right).

When you see a comparative with no comparison there are two possibilities.

1. The thing being 'compared to' has been mentioned earlier (it could be a lot earlier).
"Tea is made by boiling water and often served hot . . .
it is often served with milk and . . .
(long paragraph about tea).
"Fruit juice is cooler, usually chilled . . ."

"Fruit juice is cooler than tea"

2. There is an 'understood' omitted phrase - something like "than it already is" or "than would otherwise be the case".
This is when the writer describes things through the use of unusual comparisons, for effect, interest, to make things clearer.
This is when the writer describes things through the use of unusual comparisons, for effect, interest, to make things clearer than they would be otherwise.


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Jigneshbharati
Posted: Monday, May 15, 2017 1:20:04 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 11/3/2016
Posts: 641
Neurons: 3,625
Thank you all.
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