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What difference is there between 'get up' and 'wake up'? Options
A cooperator
Posted: Saturday, April 01, 2017 9:42:36 PM

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Joined: 10/27/2011
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Location: Ḩāḑírah, Hadramawt, Yemen
Hi,


What difference is there between 'get up' and 'wake up'?

Is the difference we use "get up" after sleeping.
We use "wake up" for the mind sleepiness.

I think 'wake up ' is used to old age. My dad wakes up early. However, 'get up' for a child. Don't do a noise, the child will get up.


We cannot say 'my dad gets up early'


Whoever doesn't own what he promises to those who do not deserve must not promise it.
thar
Posted: Saturday, April 01, 2017 9:59:34 PM

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Yes you can.

They are different actions.


To wake up is to stop sleeping.
You have only two possible states: you are asleep or awake.

To get up is to rise from your bed and get washed and dressed.
You have two possible states: in bed, or up.

I often wake up early but stay lying in bed, and don't get up till a bit later.


You can get up any time after you wake up.
You can't get up before you wake up. That is impossible (unless you are sleepwalking). But sometimes you have to get up when you still feel half-asleep.
You know who I am
Posted: Saturday, April 01, 2017 10:11:22 PM

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A cooperator wrote:
Hi,


What difference is there between 'get up' and 'wake up'?

Is the difference we use "get up" after sleeping.
We use "wake up" for the mind sleepiness.

I think 'wake up ' is used to old age. My dad wakes up early. However, 'get up' for a child. Don't do a noise, the child will get up.


We cannot say 'my dad gets up early'


Hello, cooperator.

In addition to thar's great answer:
Get up and Wake up are both phrasal verbs and very similar in some aspects; however, they are split into two different categories: Wake up is the transitive separable phrasal verb - Phrasal verbs that take one direct object and its direct object can come after or before the preposition: I will wake the sleeping people up - I will wake up the sleeping people.

Get up is an intransitive phrasal verb - A phrasal verb that doens't take any direct object, thus, it can't be separated (of course, there is no direct object) - I will get up

The differences between both, I think, thar has explained very well.


I am the way, and the truth and the life, no one comes to the Father except through Me. - John 14:6
Ashwin Joshi
Posted: Sunday, April 02, 2017 12:33:13 AM

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thar writes;

To wake up is to stop sleeping.
You have only two possible states: you are asleep or awake.

To get up is to rise from your bed and get washed and dressed.
You have two possible states: in bed, or up.
Applause Applause Applause

Just to...say get up is leaving the bed.

Me Gathering Pebbles at The Seashore.-Aj
Sarrriesfan
Posted: Sunday, April 02, 2017 1:31:20 AM
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Ashwin Joshi wrote:
thar writes;

To wake up is to stop sleeping.
You have only two possible states: you are asleep or awake.

To get up is to rise from your bed and get washed and dressed.
You have two possible states: in bed, or up.
Applause Applause Applause

Just to...say get up is leaving the bed.


Yes for example sometimes in the middle of the night I wake up from sleep, get up out of bed and go to the lavatory and then go back to bed and try to sleep again.
Get up does not always imply washing and dressing.

I lack the imagination for a witty signature.
Romany
Posted: Sunday, April 02, 2017 5:48:26 AM
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Sarrie -

I thought about it for a while - and I still tend to agree with Thar.

"What time do you get up?", "I'll ring you when I get up." "I can't give you a time - it depends on when I get up."

In all of these we do indeed mean after one has showered and dressed. (And chugged some coffee, in my case!)

Any other time one gets up, tho' is qualified:

"I had to get up twice in the night to go to the lav."
"That damn cat had me getting up in the middle of the night to lob a boot at it."
"Being a new parent is hell: you spend half the night getting up to change nappies or feed screaming babies."

What do you think?
thar
Posted: Sunday, April 02, 2017 6:17:36 AM

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Agree. (With both of you)
'Getting up' as a simple act (especially with a time given) implies the morning action. No reason except that is the way the world seems to work.

But 'getting up to...' gives a reason for leaving your nice, comfy bed. Once that reason is over, you would tend to go back to it! Whistle

But it will always have context to show what you mean.
Wilmar (USA)
Posted: Sunday, April 02, 2017 6:06:59 PM

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I wake up at 4:30am, and I get up at 5:45am.
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Monday, April 03, 2017 6:48:44 AM

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In normal circumstances I get up at 7am. After that I go to sauna. About 8am I wake up, and am ready to take some coffee, breakfast, and some human-like conversation.


In the beginning there was nothing, which exploded.
Ashwin Joshi
Posted: Monday, April 03, 2017 12:53:29 PM

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Jyrkkä Jätkä writes;In normal circumstances I get up at 7am. After that I go to sauna. About 8am I wake up, and am ready to take some coffee, breakfast, and some human-like conversation.

What about in 'special' circumstances, Pal?


Me Gathering Pebbles at The Seashore.-Aj
A cooperator
Posted: Tuesday, April 11, 2017 8:23:54 PM

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Location: Ḩāḑírah, Hadramawt, Yemen
thar wrote:
Agree. (With both of you)
'Getting up' as a simple act (especially with a time given) implies the morning action. No reason except that is the way the world seems to work.

But 'getting up to...' gives a reason for leaving your nice, comfy bed. Once that reason is over, you would tend to go back to it! Whistle

But it will always have context to show what you mean.



Thank you all of you very much indeed,
so, you don't think that the difference is we use "get up" after sleeping, and we use "wake up" for the mind sleepiness.


Although I didn't remember exactly the sentence which I was discussing with my English-New Zealand teacher since that was 5 years ago, If my memory doesn't deceive, I think I said "He got me up" or something like this. However, my teacher laughed and he said this was funny language. We could only use 'get up' for getting up a child like "don't do much noise, you will get the child up". On the other hand, we could use 'wake up' for older persons(not children). I am NOT quite sure about the sentence I used, as said beforehand, but I only remember that my teacher laughed when I used 'get up' with a person not a child.

Whoever doesn't own what he promises to those who do not deserve must not promise it.
A cooperator
Posted: Sunday, April 16, 2017 7:36:55 PM

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Could anyone please take some of his precious time out to reply to my last reply?

Whoever doesn't own what he promises to those who do not deserve must not promise it.
Sarrriesfan
Posted: Monday, April 17, 2017 11:59:00 AM
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Dear A cooperators not knowing the full context of the conversation between you and your teacher 5 years ago makes this slightly difficult.

But I would disagree with them, I would not say ' do not make too much noise, you will get the child up' I would say 'do not make too much noise, you will wake the child up'.

Noise will wake the child from their sleep, them getting up is something that they do after they have woken from sleep.

An older person equally can be woken from their sleep by noise, but getting up is the act of rising from their bed.

The context will tell you if getting up is a temporary thing like getting up to use the lavatory in the middle of the night, or getting up start the day.

It may be something that is normal in New Zealand English though I do not know.

I lack the imagination for a witty signature.
Sarrriesfan
Posted: Monday, April 17, 2017 12:04:03 PM
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Romany wrote:

Sarrie -

I thought about it for a while - and I still tend to agree with Thar.

"What time do you get up?", "I'll ring you when I get up." "I can't give you a time - it depends on when I get up."

In all of these we do indeed mean after one has showered and dressed. (And chugged some coffee, in my case!)

Any other time one gets up, tho' is qualified:

"I had to get up twice in the night to go to the lav."
"That damn cat had me getting up in the middle of the night to lob a boot at it."
"Being a new parent is hell: you spend half the night getting up to change nappies or feed screaming babies."

What do you think?


I think I would disagree, but may be its my status as a person with a sleeping disorder, amongst many other illnesses, that makes me consider the act of waking from sleep and getting up from bed something that I may do at various times of the day, as different from the act of washing and breakfasting at the start of the day.

I lack the imagination for a witty signature.
A cooperator
Posted: Sunday, April 23, 2017 5:55:03 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 10/27/2011
Posts: 2,183
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Location: Ḩāḑírah, Hadramawt, Yemen
Sarrriesfan wrote:
Romany wrote:

Sarrie -

I thought about it for a while - and I still tend to agree with Thar.

"What time do you get up?", "I'll ring you when I get up." "I can't give you a time - it depends on when I get up."

In all of these we do indeed mean after one has showered and dressed. (And chugged some coffee, in my case!)

Any other time one gets up, tho' is qualified:

"I had to get up twice in the night to go to the lav."
"That damn cat had me getting up in the middle of the night to lob a boot at it."
"Being a new parent is hell: you spend half the night getting up to change nappies or feed screaming babies."

What do you think?


I think I would disagree, but may be its my status as a person with a sleeping disorder, amongst many other illnesses, that makes me consider the act of waking from sleep and getting up from bed something that I may do at various times of the day, as different from the act of washing and breakfasting at the start of the day.



Thanks a lot, Sarriesfan
So, you don't think that the difference is we use "get up" after sleeping, and we use "wake up" for the mind sleepiness.

Whoever doesn't own what he promises to those who do not deserve must not promise it.
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