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tomcrossson
Posted: Friday, March 24, 2017 12:02:47 PM

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Joined: 12/8/2014
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Location: Twain Harte, California, United States
In memory of Jules Verne. He saw the future & wrote about it. TH-CA - 03/24/2017
Ashwin Joshi
Posted: Tuesday, April 11, 2017 9:21:14 AM

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Joined: 8/3/2016
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Location: Jandiāla Guru, Punjab, India






Me Gathering Pebbles at The Seashore.-Aj
Ashwin Joshi
Posted: Tuesday, April 11, 2017 9:22:18 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 8/3/2016
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Location: Jandiāla Guru, Punjab, India
The sentence is not clear.

To my mind it should either be;

In memory of Jules Verne-who saw the Future and wrote about it.

or

Jules Verne, in his memory, saw the Future and wrote about it.

The rest is your location and date of posting I suppose.



Me Gathering Pebbles at The Seashore.-Aj
Romany
Posted: Tuesday, April 11, 2017 12:32:29 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/14/2009
Posts: 13,358
Neurons: 40,721
Location: Brighton, England, United Kingdom

Psst! Guys -

Although people - both learners & natives - welcome advice when they've made a mistake or a typo, we don't do it on other threads.

Remember this is not an ESL site.

While the Vocabulary & Grammar sites are mostly used by ESL learners, the other forums are merely for discussion. And, while it wouldn't do to correct anyone in a vocal conversation, we don't want to embarrass anyone by pointing out perceived flaws in how they communicate their ideas in a cyber-discussion.

So - a discussion about Jules Verne and his futuristic world is what one would come to 'Literature' for. But opinions about other folks' English will only hurt feelings.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Wednesday, April 12, 2017 8:12:31 AM

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Joined: 9/12/2011
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Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
I quite like the original post.
It is a perfectly normal "obituary-style" message.

It is interesting that Jules Verne, in most English editions before 1960 at least, was abridged, edited and censored to such an extent that he was considered a "children's science fiction writer".

I read some of his originals in French in the 1960s and was amazed - this was nothing like the books we had been given in school as "Jules Verne's adventures".


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Romany
Posted: Wednesday, April 12, 2017 2:06:56 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/14/2009
Posts: 13,358
Neurons: 40,721
Location: Brighton, England, United Kingdom

I do remember lurid comics? But didn't know he was considered a kids writer at one stage: - that's weird.

My father loved early Sci-fi however, so I read his copies and loved the way they were written. When a friend smuggled me in a comic-version (I wasn't allowed them) I was well annoyed that they weren't 'right'. They didn't match the images the words had conjured up to me.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Thursday, April 13, 2017 8:15:09 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 27,307
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Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
Yes - it was the same when I read the real 'Gulliver' - it was nothing like the one I'd been given at school.




Never read a comic/illustrated version after you've read the book.
It never matches the vividness of your own imagination.
Even Alice in Wonderland, illustrated by anyone other than John Tenniel feels 'wrong'.

The best I have seen was The Lord Of The Rings - though it didn't match my 'pictures' the effects were so epic that it was worth it.

Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
NeuroticHellFem
Posted: Sunday, April 23, 2017 2:29:48 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/22/2014
Posts: 2,220
Neurons: 1,783,733
Location: Lilyfield, New South Wales, Australia
Drag0nspeaker wrote:
I quite like the original post.
It is a perfectly normal "obituary-style" message.

It is interesting that Jules Verne, in most English editions before 1960 at least, was abridged, edited and censored to such an extent that he was considered a "children's science fiction writer".

I read some of his originals in French in the 1960s and was amazed - this was nothing like the books we had been given in school as "Jules Verne's adventures".


This comes as a shock to me! I read most of Verne's books as a kid - or so I thought! Now I want to reread more accurate translations. You've blown my mind Drag0nspeaker! Thank you!

(I thought the opening post was fine too.)


When you make an assumption, you make an ass of u & umption! - NeuroticHellFem
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