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I hold every man a debtor to his profession; from the which as men of course do seek to receive countenance and profit, so... Options
Daemon
Posted: Tuesday, March 21, 2017 12:00:00 AM
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I hold every man a debtor to his profession; from the which as men of course do seek to receive countenance and profit, so ought they of duty to endeavor themselves, by way of amends, to be a help and ornament thereunto.

Francis Bacon (1561-1626)
KSPavan
Posted: Tuesday, March 21, 2017 1:12:27 AM

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Quotation of the Day

I hold every man a debtor to his profession; from the which as men of course do seek to receive countenance and profit, so ought they of duty to endeavor themselves, by way of amends, to be a help and ornament thereunto.

Francis Bacon (1561-1626)
pedro
Posted: Tuesday, March 21, 2017 10:44:13 AM

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Daemon wrote:
I hold every man a debtor to his profession; from the which as men of course do seek to receive countenance and profit, so ought they of duty to endeavor themselves, by way of amends, to be a help and ornament thereunto.

Francis Bacon (1561-1626)


earn your keep is pithier

All good ideas arrive by chance- Max Ernst
monamagda
Posted: Tuesday, March 21, 2017 11:12:29 AM

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Location: Bogotá, Bogota D.C., Colombia

Context from: Law Tracts - The Elements Of The Common Laws Of England Maxims Of The Law



The elements of the common laws of England, branched into a double tract: the one containing A collection of some principal rules and maxims of the common law, with their latitude and extent. Explicated for the more facile introduction of such as are studiously addicted to that noble profession. the other The use of the common law, for preservation of our persons, goods, and good names. According to the laws and costumes of this land
by Bacon, Francis, 1561-1626

Published 1636

https://archive.org/details/elementsofcommon00baco

Bully_rus
Posted: Tuesday, March 21, 2017 2:34:14 PM
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Joined: 3/26/2013
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Location: Minsk, Minskaya Voblasts', Belarus
Daemon wrote:
I hold every man a debtor to his profession; from the which as men of course do seek to receive countenance and profit, so ought they of duty to endeavor themselves, by way of amends, to be a help and ornament thereunto.

Francis Bacon (1561-1626)


It is times when professions come and go like never before - so that some debts aren't meant to be repaid...
Verbatim
Posted: Tuesday, March 21, 2017 10:44:39 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 10/3/2012
Posts: 1,996
Neurons: 230,962
Daemon wrote:
I hold every man a debtor to his profession; from the which as men of course do seek to receive countenance and profit, so ought they of duty to endeavor themselves, by way of amends, to be a help and ornament thereunto.

Francis Bacon (1561-1626)


Be so true to thyself as thou be not false to others. Francis Bacon (1561-1626) Only the other day.

That's where the difficulty is, in the order of precedence. We live up to the first part of the precept,
at best, after having failed the test of the second part.


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