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he has been invested in Options
Харбин Хэйлунцзян 1
Posted: Monday, March 20, 2017 8:30:12 AM

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http://www.highwater.ky/director/simon-cox/

Quote:
Since 1997 he has been invested in more than 200 hedge, private equity and fixed income fund vehicles.

Does this mean that he invested his money in 1997 and since then kept it in those assets?
Does this mean that he has been involved in this business since 1997?

Anything else?
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Monday, March 20, 2017 8:59:17 AM

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Possibly it is a specific style of English used in business (those people speak and write in some very strange ways!)

Where it says "he has been invested in", 'invested in' is an adjectival participle phrase.
It means "He is in a state of having invested his money in . . ." In my opinion, this would be the more common way to write it.
One does not invest oneself in a hedge-fund, one invests one's money
To me it 'sounds' more like a passive for some reason - like some other person has invested his body in these companies - but that would make no sense.

When I read the sentence only, I guess it means that he invested his money in 1997 and since then kept it in those assets. It does not mean that he started in the business in 1997 - he may have started in investments earlier.

However, when I read the whole article, I understand that he worked in financial investigations from 1986 to 1997, and started in investments in 1997.

Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Харбин Хэйлунцзян 1
Posted: Monday, March 20, 2017 9:16:41 AM

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Drag0nspeaker wrote:
Possibly it is a specific style of English used in business (those people speak and write in some very strange ways!)

Thank you very much!
You know who I am
Posted: Monday, March 20, 2017 9:59:50 AM

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Харбин Хэйлунцзян 1 wrote:
http://www.highwater.ky/director/simon-cox/

Quote:
Since 1997 he has been invested in more than 200 hedge, private equity and fixed income fund vehicles.

Does this mean that he invested his money in 1997 and since then kept it in those assets?
Does this mean that he has been involved in this business since 1997?

Anything else?


I see it as a passive perfect construction (A passive construction in the perfect tense).

He has been invested in means that someone has invested in him; so as to make it clear, you just need to add the agent: He has been invested in by the owner more than 200 hedge, which means: The owner has invested in him more than 200 hedge.

That's how I see it; if invested were in the present participle form (-ing), then it could be considered a present perfect continuous construction, which would mean that he has been investing in more than 200 hedge, "more than 200 hedge" is what he is investing in, i.e: More than 200 hedge has been invested in by him.

Jesus, He is the way, the truth and the life, no one gets to the Father if not through Him.
NKM
Posted: Monday, March 20, 2017 2:56:40 PM

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Not passive at all, as I understand it, but rather more of a reflexive construction.

Perhaps "invested" should be thought of as an adjective here.

You know who I am
Posted: Monday, March 20, 2017 3:01:08 PM

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NKM wrote:
Not passive at all, as I understand it, but rather more of a reflexive construction.

Perhaps "invested" is used as an adjective here.



Hi, NKM.

The only reasonable answer I can find is that this is a passive construction, if not, how would you explain He has "been invested" in? No way it can be an active construction, auxiliar verb be in the third form + past participle.. As I said above, if the verb invested were in present participle (-ING), it would be a present perfect progressive, however, since it is not, the only reasonable explanation for this structure is a passive construction.

Jesus, He is the way, the truth and the life, no one gets to the Father if not through Him.
NKM
Posted: Monday, March 20, 2017 3:57:25 PM

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Sometimes the past participle is treated as an adjective, taking on a reflexive sense.

- "He used to be rather gregarious, but recently he's been withdrawn. He's been immersed in his studies."

- "He has been totally invested in his career for so long that he has few friends left."

You know who I am
Posted: Monday, March 20, 2017 4:02:00 PM

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NKM wrote:
Sometimes the past participle is treated as an adjective, taking on a reflexive sense.

- "He was always rather gregarious, but recently he's been withdrawn."



Hi, NKM.

Yes, you are right, and I considered it as well; however, even if it were acting as an adjective, it wouldn't make sense anyway, you can realize it by seeing the prepositional phrase "in more than 200 hedge", which clearly tells us that "invested" is acting as a verb due to the preposition "in", which implies the direction of the investment.

Jesus, He is the way, the truth and the life, no one gets to the Father if not through Him.
thar
Posted: Monday, March 20, 2017 4:25:21 PM

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'To be invested in something' is used - just not for investing money!
It implies personal commitment. Sometimes even inappropriate meddling.

And generally with an additional adverb:

Eg
He is heavily invested in the success of this venture.
Or
Quote:
LaVar Ball is a loving, invested parent. Why wouldn't he say hyperbolic things about his son?



But I agree this sounds like a misuse in the OP example. Corporate speak likes to feel special.


For future reference - you would give the whole noun when giving your explanation
'In hedge' is incomplete. 'hedge' is just the attributive noun.
You would add the whole object noun
...In hedge funds
Or, to match the original sentence
..in hedge fund vehicles
- although I'd bet my uninvested dollar that is just a more expensive way of saying hedge funds. Or are the vehicles bonds betting on hedge funds, not even investing in them?
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Tuesday, March 21, 2017 5:28:00 AM

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Whatever the form of this strange sentence, the meaning is:
Since 1997 he has invested in more than 200 hedge fund vehicles, private equity fund vehicles and fixed income fund vehicles.

However, I cannot find a definition of 'vehicle' which will fit in this sentence - I guess it's just a random word 'thrown in' by the speaker/writer to 'sound good.

It just seems to mean:
Since 1997 he has invested in more than 200 hedge funds, private equity funds and fixed income funds.

Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
NKM
Posted: Tuesday, March 21, 2017 5:20:15 PM

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vehicle:
 2. A medium through which something is transmitted, expressed, or accomplished: His novels are a vehicle for his political views.

Presumably, a "hedge fund vehicle" is an investment group, firm or consortium through which one participates or invests in hedge funds.

almo 1
Posted: Tuesday, March 21, 2017 7:03:06 PM
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Харбин Хэйлунцзян 1 wrote:
http://www.highwater.ky/director/simon-cox/

Quote:
Since 1997 he has been invested in more than 200 hedge, private equity and fixed income fund vehicles.

Does this mean that he invested his money in 1997 and since then kept it in those assets?
Does this mean that he has been involved in this business since 1997?

Anything else?







I remember an example in this forum:

...her (sort of) appearance at the end of Rouge One made me realise how emotionally invested I am to the Star Wars franchise.

forum.thefreedictionary.com/postsm918982_May-the-Force




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