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(Expression) It cost me A LOT OF money! Options
TheParser
Posted: Friday, March 17, 2017 9:09:58 AM
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NOT A TEACHER


Dear Fellow Learners:

You may want to add this to your list of expressions.


*****


Mrs. Smith: I hear that you and Martha are leaving next week for a six-month trip to Europe.

Mr. Miller: That's right! Now that the kids have left home, we can fulfill our dream of visiting the Old World.

Mrs. Smith: Were you able to find an inexpensive [cheap] group tour?

Mr. Miller: No way! Martha and I are flying first-class. We're going to stay at the finest hotels. We're going to dine at the best restaurants. I have even hired a driver and car in each of the 15 cities that we'll visit.

Mrs. Smith: Oh my! Won't that cost you an arm and a leg?

Mr. Miller: I don't care! Nothing is too good for my Martha!
Ashwin Joshi
Posted: Friday, March 17, 2017 1:35:32 PM

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The phrase 'costs an arm and leg' is used to describe anything that is considered to be extremely expensive or excessively pricey. If a person thinks the cost of something is unreasonably high, they might use this common idiom to describe the price. The origin of this phrase is unclear.

Me Gathering Pebbles at The Seashore.-Aj
hedy mmm
Posted: Friday, March 17, 2017 11:06:52 PM

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Thank you TheParser for your thread...they are always so inspiring...you are a TEACHER.

Yes, Ashwin Joshi, the origin of this phrase is unclear.

On that note, here are a few guesses as to where it may have come from: One theory is that this saying originated from the early 20th century, possibly during one of the major World Wars. The idea being that soldiers, because of their heavy involvement in war and being in the line of fire, can sometimes lose a hand, foot, leg, or arm. Thus, the war could literally cost the person their arm or leg, which is a high price to pay.

Another guess is that this phrase may simply derive from older expressions that also use arms and legs as ways to describe a high cost. For example, there's an expression that goes something like 'I would give my right arm,' that dates back to at least the late 18th century. The earliest recording of this is written in a magazine called The Lady's Magazine: Or Entertaining Companion for the Fair Sex, Appropriated Solely to Their Use and Amusement, 1790, and it reads:

"This is my sole desire—my only passion; and in order to gratify it, I would give my right arm, and my entire fortune."

A TRUE 'GAVE AN ARM & A LEG' STORY:
Retired Marine Corps Sgt. John Peck, 31, a quadruple amputee got new arms and a new life in Oct. 2016. Six years before, in Afghanistan, he stepped on an explosive device and lost all his limbs. After nearly a 2 year wait, he received transplants of both arms from an anonymous donor. The 13 hr. surgery was a total success. He is the second quadruple amputee from wars in Iran and Afghanistan, to receive a double transplant. There have been over 60 cases of transplants of one limb.

This story was featured in TFD's 'News': Amputee Gets Arms, on October 7th 2016...most definetly a must read...

"God graced us with today....don't waste it." hedy
Ashwin Joshi
Posted: Saturday, March 18, 2017 12:38:06 AM

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Bravo! Sgt. Peck...and thanks3 hedy for sharing the excellent story and explanation of
' may cost you(one) an arm and a leg'.

Me Gathering Pebbles at The Seashore.-Aj
TheParser
Posted: Saturday, March 18, 2017 10:47:18 AM
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Thanks, Mr. Joshi and Hedy.

That information was fascinating, Hedy. It really helped me and many other learners.

I wish you both a great weekend.

(So glad to see that you got through that snowstorm, Hedy.)
Харбин Хэйлунцзян 1
Posted: Saturday, March 18, 2017 11:48:00 AM

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hedy mmm wrote:
On that note, here are a few guesses as to where it may have come from: One theory is that this saying originated from the early 20th century, possibly during one of the major World Wars.

Nowadays everyone can endeavor at research. There's the Google Books out there and it looks like this is the earliest example:

Planning and Operating a Successful Food Service Operation, by William L. Kahrl

It's from 1973.

აბა ყვავებს ვინ დაიჭერს, კარგო? გალიაში ბულბულები ზიან.
TheParser
Posted: Saturday, March 18, 2017 12:17:07 PM
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Thanks, XX.
Ashwin Joshi
Posted: Saturday, March 18, 2017 12:26:20 PM

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TheParser Sir. Please explain XX.

Me Gathering Pebbles at The Seashore.-Aj
TheParser
Posted: Saturday, March 18, 2017 12:34:12 PM
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Ashwin Joshi wrote:
TheParser Sir. Please explain XX.


That is how I refer to the member whose user name is in the Cyrillic alphabet.

Of course, I cannot read that alphabet.


Have a nice day!
Ashwin Joshi
Posted: Saturday, March 18, 2017 1:10:37 PM

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Ignorance is a bliss, at many times or all times.
Do you agree?


Me Gathering Pebbles at The Seashore.-Aj
TheParser
Posted: Sunday, March 19, 2017 9:15:23 AM
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Ashwin Joshi wrote:
Ignorance is a bliss, at many times or all times.
Do you agree?


Interesting statement, Mr. Joshi.

I think that some very wise people have said that it is a good thing that we do NOT know what is just around the corner.
hedy mmm
Posted: Monday, March 20, 2017 5:17:09 PM

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Here are more facts concerning the phrase in your awesome thread TheParser.

The line “I’d give my right arm…” dates from the early 1600s. The phrase “an arm and a leg” rattled off the tongue easily before it was used to signify an exorbitant price.

After the American Civil War, Congress enacted a special pension for soldiers who had lost both an arm and a leg. The phrase “cost an arm and a leg” begins to crop up in newspaper archives in 1901, referring to accidents and war injuries.

In 1949, it shows up in the figurative sense. The Long Beach Independent reported, "Food editor Beulah Karney has … ideas for the homemaker who wants to say 'Merry Christmas' and not have it cost an arm and a leg."



"God graced us with today....don't waste it." hedy
tunaafi
Posted: Monday, March 20, 2017 5:55:01 PM

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hedy mmm wrote:
Here are more facts concerning the phrase


Your facts, unfortunately, are no more factual than any of the other theories.
TheParser
Posted: Tuesday, March 21, 2017 8:50:54 AM
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hedy mmm wrote:


After the American Civil War, Congress enacted a special pension for soldiers who had lost both an arm and a leg.




Thanks for the very interesting comments, Hedy.
Romany
Posted: Tuesday, March 21, 2017 9:41:34 AM
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While I've searched historical, government and military sources, and found the whole history of how pensions for Civil War soldiers gradually came into being - around 1877 -couldn't find reference to any special payment for those who had lost both an upper and lower limb.

BUT...what I did find was this rather grisly showcase of exactly how amputations were performed. I'm sure some of you will find it interesting...in a kind of shuddery way!
Харбин Хэйлунцзян 1
Posted: Tuesday, March 21, 2017 10:01:11 AM

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Location: Dzerzhinskiy, Moskovskaya, Russia
Romany wrote:
couldn't find reference to any special payment for those who had lost both an upper and lower limb.

Sessional Indexes to the Annals of Congress

Quote:
To allow soldiers or sailors who have lost an arm and leg in the military service of the United States a pension for each disability. Introduced by Mr. Morrill and referred to Committee on Invalid Pensions 6568.

While 'lost an arm and leg' has been used since the 19th century 'cost an arm and leg' is a fairly new expression:

lost an arm and leg VS cost an arm and leg


აბა ყვავებს ვინ დაიჭერს, კარგო? გალიაში ბულბულები ზიან.
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